Casuarinaceae

Taylor, Gary S., Jennings, John T., Purcell, Matthew F. & Austin, Andy D., 2011, A new genus and ten new species of jumping plant lice (Hemiptera: Triozidae) from Allocasuarina (Casuarinaceae) in Australia, Zootaxa 3009, pp. 1-45 : 4-5

publication ID

https://doi.org/ 10.5281/zenodo.278552

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:DE18A06F-9AA9-4800-9027-1DC479E72412

DOI

https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5619978

persistent identifier

https://treatment.plazi.org/id/8D30C212-FF93-3270-6EA7-C1DAFA78C211

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Casuarinaceae
status

 

Key to the triozid fauna of Casuarinaceae

1. Fore wings of female usually with dark markings [clear in species from New Caledonia]; fore wings of male clear; anterior margin of vertex not overhanging genal processes; genal processes short conical, little-declined to longitudinal axis of body and visible from above; female proctiger short with a pair of lateral lobes; male parameres short, narrow, little curved to apex; nymphs broadly ovate, weakly sclerotised, typically ‘triozine’ in type; host: Casuarina ................................................................................................ Casuarinicola Taylor [see Taylor et al. 2010]

- Fore wings of female and male clear; anterior margin of vertex overhanging genal processes; genal processes moderate in length, produced ventrad to longitudinal axis of body; female proctiger short with rounded apex or with apical upturned process or hook; male parameres short, strongly curved to apex, long and thin ( Figs 94 –95, 98 View FIGURES 93 – 102 ) to short and wide ( Figs 131, 134 View FIGURES 127 – 135 ); nymphs scale-like, usually strongly to moderately sclerotised; host: Allocasuarina .................................. 2

2. Rhinaria on antennal segments 4, 6 and 9; hind tibia without apical spurs, at most with a corona of setae; female proctiger short, with apex rounded (without an apical upturned process or hook) ( Figs 18 View FIGURES 14 – 18 , 39 View FIGURES 37 – 42 )… [ Aacanthocnema ] 3

- Rhinaria on antennal segments 4, 6, 8 and 9; hind tibia with 2 inner and 1 outer apical spurs; female proctiger short, with an apical upturned process ( Figs 99, 102 View FIGURES 93 – 102 ) or prominent hook ( Figs 96 View FIGURES 93 – 102 , 135 View FIGURES 127 – 135 ).............. [ Acanthocasuarina gen. nov.].... 8

3. Fore wings with brown infuscation along veins R+M+Cu, M, m 1 + 2, m 3 + 4, Cu, Cu 1 a, Cu 1 b and distal portion of Rs ( Figs 3 View FIGURES 1 – 5 , 10– 11 View FIGURES 6 – 13 ).............................................................................................. 4

- Fore wings without brown infuscation (e.g., Figs 23–24 View FIGURES 19 – 28 ), or at most with brown infuscation restricted to portion of vein Cu 1 a ( Figs 47–48 View FIGURES 43 – 50 )......................................................................................... 5

4. Large species (for all parameters measured in Tables 1–3); antennal length proportional to head width long, AL:HW> 1.5; fore wings long, WL:WW>3.0; host: Allocasuarina tolulosa ; distribution: coastal, subcoastal eastern Australia.......................................................................................... Aa. burckhardti Taylor , sp. nov.

- Smaller species (for all parameters measured in Tables 1–3); antennae shorter, AL:HW <1.5; fore wings short, WL:WW <3.0; host: Allocasuarina distyla ; distribution: coastal, subcoastal south-eastern Australia, Tasmania.... Aa. casuarinae (Froggatt)

5. Head narrow, <0.70 mm, distinctly narrower than mesoscutum; male parameres strongly curved inward with flattened, bladelike apices ( Fig. 64 View FIGURES 60 – 65 ); host: A. torulosa ; distribution: coastal, subcoastal eastern Australia...... Aa. torulosae Taylor sp. nov.

- Head moderate to wide,> 0.70 mm, equal to or wider than mesonotum; male parameres strongly curved inward with rounded, horn-shaped apices ( Figs 38, 41 View FIGURES 37 – 42 , 61 View FIGURES 60 – 65 )...................................................................... 6

6. Head very wide,> 0.80 mm; vertex very short and wide (VL:HW <0.35; AL:HW <1.20); anterior edge of vertex rather flat when viewed from dorsal aspect ( Figs 29–30 View FIGURES 29 – 36 ); host: A. huegeliana ; distribution: subcoastal, inland Western Australia................................................................................. Aa. huegelianae Taylor sp. nov.

- Head moderately wide, ≤ 0.80 mm; vertex long and narrow (VL:HW> 0.35; AL:HW> 1.20); anterior edge of vertex distinctly curved when viewed from dorsal aspect ( Figs 19 –20 View FIGURES 19 – 28 , 43–44 View FIGURES 43 – 50 , 51– 52 View FIGURES 51 – 59 )............................................. 7

7. Basal half of adult fore wing vein Cu 1 a with brown infuscation ( Figs 47–48 View FIGURES 43 – 50 ); male parameres with basal lobe ( Fig. 61 View FIGURES 60 – 65 ); host: A. luehmannii ; distribution: inland eastern Australia.................................. Aa. luehmannii Taylor sp. nov.

- Basal half of adult fore wing vein Cu 1 a without infuscation; basal portion of male parameres more or less parallel-sided when viewed from lateral aspect, without basal swelling ( Fig. 38 View FIGURES 37 – 42 ); host: A. verticillata ; distribution: southern Australia, Tasmania.................................................................................... Aa. dobsoni (Froggatt)

8. Vertex short and wide (VL:VW <0.60) (Table 4)............................................................ 9

-. Vertex moderately long and wide (VL:VW> 0.65).......................................................... 10

9. Male terminalia as in Fig. 93 View FIGURES 93 – 102 ; male parameres long, thin, 0.25–0.27 mm ( Figs 94–95 View FIGURES 93 – 102 ); dorso-posterior margin of female proctiger angled when viewed from lateral aspect; proctiger with a prominent sharply-upturned apical hook ( Fig. 96 View FIGURES 93 – 102 ); host: A. acutivalvis ; distribution: subcoastal, inland Western Australia................................... Ac. acutivalvis sp. nov.

- Male terminalia as in Fig. 97 View FIGURES 93 – 102 ; male parameres moderately long, thin, 0.23–0.25 mm ( Fig. 98 View FIGURES 93 – 102 ); dorso-posterior margin of female proctiger evenly curved when viewed from lateral aspect; proctiger with less prominent upturned apical process ( Fig. 99 View FIGURES 93 – 102 ); host: A. campestris ; distribution: subcoastal, inland Western Australia...................... Ac. campestris sp. nov.

10. Cu 1 cell value <1.00 ( Table 5).......................................................................... 11

- Cu 1 cell value> 1.15 .................................................................................. 12

11. Male parameres short, parallel-sided when viewed from lateral aspect ( Fig. 131 View FIGURES 127 – 135 ); dorso-posterior margin of female proctiger moderately curved when viewed from lateral aspect; proctiger with a less prominent upturned apical process ( Fig. 132 View FIGURES 127 – 135 ); host: A. (?) littoralis ; distribution: Tasmania.................................................... Ac. tasmanica sp. nov.

- Male parameres short, with prominent posterior lobe when viewed from lateral aspect, ( Fig. 134 View FIGURES 127 – 135 ); dorso-posterior margin of female proctiger angled when viewed from lateral aspect; proctiger with a prominent sharply-upturned apical hook ( Fig. 135 View FIGURES 127 – 135 ); host: A. verticillata ; distribution: southern Australia, Tasmania.............................. Ac. verticillatae sp. nov.

12. Male parameres moderately long, pyriform, 0.18–0.21 mm ( Fig. 101 View FIGURES 93 – 102 ); dorso-posterior margin of female proctiger evenly curved to apex when viewed from lateral aspect ( Fig. 102 View FIGURES 93 – 102 ); host: A. diminuta ; distribution: central New South Wales.......................................................................................... Ac. diminutae sp. nov.

- Male parameres moderately long, thin, 0.21–0.23 mm ( Fig. 128 View FIGURES 127 – 135 ); lateral profile of proctiger rather flat dorsally, angling more abruptly to apex when viewed from lateral aspect ( Fig. 129 View FIGURES 127 – 135 ); host: A. muelleriana ; distribution: southern South Australia.................................................................................... Ac. muellerianae sp. nov.