Aleurodicus dispersus Russell,

John H. Martin, 2004, Whiteflies of Belize (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae). Part 1 — introduction and account of the subfamily Aleurodicinae Quaintance & Baker, Zootaxa 681, pp. 1-86: 21

publication ID

http://doi.org/ 10.5281/zenodo.158856

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:09E88A9E-0B80-4D90-80FD-E743FCE3B89B

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/FD3C627A-FFB6-FF96-FF40-FC9BFEC3F890

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Aleurodicus dispersus Russell
status

 

Aleurodicus dispersus Russell 

( Figs 3, 63, 123)

Aleurodicus dispersus Russell, 1965: 49  –54. Holotype, Florida [paratypes examined].

DISTRIBUTION. Neotropical Region — widely distributed; Nearctic Region — Florida; Palaearctic Region — Canary Islands, Madeira; Ethiopian Region — Cameroun, Congo, Benin, Ghana, Nigeria, Sao Tomé, Togo; Malagasian Region — Mauritius; Oriental Region — India, Maldives, Sri Lanka, Thailand; Austro­oriental and Pacific Regions — widely distributed; Australia — northern Queensland.

COMMENTS. A. dispersus  is one of only two known Aleurodicus  species that possess only 4 pairs of abdominal compound pores, in total, on the puparium. A third member of the same small assemblage ( A. flavus Hempel  ) has additionally just one pair of tiny compound pores, situated on abdominal segment VII, otherwise strongly resembling A. dispersus  .

A. dispersus  was particularly unusual in remaining undescribed for many years, despite the accumulation of numerous samples in the USNM collection, most of them interceptions at United States port quarantine facilities; yet it is now the best­known of all Aleurodicus  species. It is probable that A. dispersus  (the so­called “spiralling whitefly”) is native to the Caribbean and northern South America. Although many of the paratypes are from these native areas, Russell chose a sample from Florida from which to select the holotype. This curious technicality qualifies A.dispersus  as one of several neotropical whiteflies to have been described from material sampled in an area of probable introduction. This choice of holotype may have been the result of most other specimens, then available to Russell, being isolated quarantine interceptions with imprecise originating locality data. Since its description, the spiralling whitefly has become almost pan­tropical in its distribution, its rapid radiation having begun in the 1980 s ( Martin & Lucas, 1984; Martin 1990).

USNM

Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Insecta

Order

Hemiptera

Family

Aleyrodidae

Genus

Aleurodicus

Loc

Aleurodicus dispersus Russell

John H. Martin 2004
2004
Loc

Aleurodicus dispersus

Russell 1965: 49
1965