Telaprocera joanae, Harmer & Framenau, 2008

Harmer, Aaron M. T. & Framenau, Volker W., 2008, Telaprocera (Araneae: Araneidae), a new genus of Australian orb-web spiders with highly elongated webs, Zootaxa 1956 (1), pp. 59-80: 75-79

publication ID

http://doi.org/ 10.11646/zootaxa.1956.1.2

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5242470

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/FA57879D-FFD2-944B-D499-239098696DE7

treatment provided by

Felipe

scientific name

Telaprocera joanae
status

sp. nov.

Telaprocera joanae   sp. nov.

( Figs 28–37 View FIGURES 28–31 View FIGURES 32–36 View FIGURE 37 )

Type material. Holotype male, Lamington National Park , national park campground at Green Mountains section, Queensland, Australia, 28°13’49”S, 153°08’04”E, A.M.T. Harmer, March 2006 ( QM S83008 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   . Paratype female, same data ( QM S83009 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   .

Other material examined. AUSTRALIA: New South Wales: 1 male, 1 female, 1 juvenile, Bruxner Park, Orara East State Forest , Coffs Harbour, 30°14’S, 153°06’E ( SAM NN24374) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, 2 females, Richmond Range , 28°59’S, 152°45’E ( QM S83012 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   . Queensland: 1 female, Boombana National Park , 27°24’S, 152°47’E ( QM S65294 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 4 females, 15 juveniles, Bunya Mountains National Park, Dandabah , 26°51’S, 151°34’E ( QM S83006 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 2 females, 2 juveniles, Crediton , 21°13’S, 148°35’E ( QM S83004 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, Dalrymple Heights , 21°04’S, 148°35’E ( AM KS6390) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, same data ( AM KS0286) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, Dalrymple Heights, Mt William , lower slopes, 21°01’S, 148°36’E ( AM KS0361) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, Eungella , schoolhouse, 21°08’S, 148°29’E ( QM S69323 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, Lamington National Park , 28°15’S, 153°08’E ( QM S83005 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; same data ( ZMUC) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, 4 juveniles, Lamington National Park, Binna Burra , 28°12’S, 153°11’E ( QM S27554 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, 5 females, 13 juveniles, same data ( QM S83002 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, Lamington National Park, Binna Burra, Tullawallal Circuit , 28°12’S, 153°11’E ( SAM NN24371) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, same data ( SAM NN24373) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, same data ( SAM NN24372) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, 3 females, 1 juvenile, Lamington National Park, Nagarigoon , 28°12’S, 153°10’E ( QM S83014 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, Lamington National Park , national park campground, 28°13'49"S, 153°08'04"E ( WAM T85242 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, same data ( WAM T85243 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 3 males, 1 female, Lamington National Park, near O’Reillys Guesthouse , 28°14’05”S, 153°08’13”E ( ZMUC) GoogleMaps   ; 2 males, 3 females, Lamington National Park, O’Reillys Trail , 28°14’S, 153°08’E ( ZMUC) GoogleMaps   ; 3 males, 1 female, same data ( ZMUC) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, same data ( QM S83007 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, 2 females, Lamington National Park, Python Trail , 28°15’S, 153°08’E ( ZMUC) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, 1 female, Mt Deongwar , 3km S, 27°13’41”S, 152°15’36”E ( QM S83003 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, Mt Superbus , 28°14’S, 152°29’E ( QM S83013 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, Tamborine National Park, Witches Falls , 27°56’27”S, 153°10’48”E ( ZMUC) GoogleMaps   ; 3 females, same data ( ZMUC) GoogleMaps   . Victoria: 1 female, Alfred National Park , 19km E Cann River, 37°32’S, 149°20’E ( AM KS3649) GoogleMaps   .

Etymology. The species is named in memory of the senior author’s maternal grandmother, Joan Worth.

Diagnosis. This species is generally smaller than T. maudae   sp. nov. and is characterised by the green colouration, narrower, more tapered abdomen, with white dorsolateral humeral projections and strong scalloped pattern on the posterior lateral surface ( Figs 28, 30 View FIGURES 28–31 ). The median apophysis of the male pedipalp is reduced in comparison to the median apophysis of T. maudae   sp. nov., and is not dish-shaped ( Figs 7 View FIGURES 4–9 , 32 View FIGURES 32–36 ). There is a basoembolic apophysis present ( Figs 7, 8 View FIGURES 4–9 , 32 View FIGURES 32–36 ), and a digitiform process originating on the terminal apophysis ( Figs 9 View FIGURES 4–9 , 32, 33 View FIGURES 32–36 ), both of which are lacking in T. maudae   sp. nov. Females can be distinguished by the comparatively wider epigyne, which is approximately two and a half times wider than long, and the short distal portion of the scape which is curved posteriorly and partially covering the copulatory openings ( Figs 11 View FIGURES 10–15 , 34, 35 View FIGURES 32–36 ).

Description. Holotype male (Lamington National Park, QM S83008 View Materials ). Carapace yellow-brown with dark band around margins and dark markings posteriorly of cephalic region ( Fig. 28 View FIGURES 28–31 ). Fovea triangular, apex pointed anteriorly with dark radiating pattern ( Fig. 28 View FIGURES 28–31 ). Black rings around eyes. Long silvery-white setae between PME. Cephalic region densely hirsute with silvery-white setae. Chelicerae light brown with four promarginal teeth, apical and second tooth from proximal end much larger than others; three retromarginal teeth, apical tooth much smaller than others. Labium dark brown proximally, fading to white distally ( Fig. 29 View FIGURES 28–31 ). Sternum yellow-brown with dark tinges towards margins. Abdomen with green, white and brown colouration, approximately round but strongly tapered posteriorly, longer than wide ( Fig. 28 View FIGURES 28–31 ). Distinct cruciform pattern, with vertical band running length of abdomen and horizontal band terminating in two pronounced white dorsolateral humeral projections ( Fig. 28 View FIGURES 28–31 ). Strong scalloped pattern on posterior lateral surface of abdomen. Legs yellow-brown with dark patches ( Figs 28, 29 View FIGURES 28–31 ). Tibiae I with short, very stout spines, arranged more or less evenly over surface, tibiae II with fewer spines. Spines less robust than in T. maudae   . Median apophysis of male pedipalp approximately hatchet-shaped ( Figs 7 View FIGURES 4–9 , 32 View FIGURES 32–36 ). Conductor with cleft supporting embolus and basoembolic apophysis, large curled lobe adjacent to cleft ( Figs 7 View FIGURES 4–9 , 32 View FIGURES 32–36 ). Basoembolic apophysis subequal in size to, and running alongside embolus, inserted at base of embolus ( Figs 7, 8 View FIGURES 4–9 , 32 View FIGURES 32–36 ). Terminal apophysis large, sickle-shaped, with digitiform process originating approximately one third of length along from proximal end of terminal apophysis (7, 9, 33).

Paratype female (Lamington National Park, QM S83009 View Materials ). Female somatic characters are as in male with the following exceptions: carapace paler with slight greenish tinge ( Fig. 30 View FIGURES 28–31 ). Row of dark macrosetae running along midline of carapace from fovea to PME. Three retromarginal teeth of similar size. Sternum yellowbrown in centre but with wide black band around margins ( Fig. 31 View FIGURES 28–31 ). Abdomen comparatively larger than male, as long as wide and less tapered posteriorly ( Fig. 30 View FIGURES 28–31 ). Epigyne in ventral view approximately two and a half times wider than long ( Fig. 34 View FIGURES 32–36 ), moderately hirsute. Extreme distal portion of scape curved posteriorly and partially covering copulatory openings, wide posterior plate extending from directly below distal portion of scape ( Figs 11 View FIGURES 10–15 , 35 View FIGURES 32–36 ). Spermathecae relatively large, spherical in shape, spaced more widely apart than in T. maudae   sp. nov. ( Figs 34. 36 View FIGURES 32–36 ).

Variation. Carapace, abdomen and legs may have stronger green colouration. This green colouration is very distinct in live specimens ( Fig. 2 View FIGURES 1–2 ) and fades after preservation in EtOH.

Measurements. Male holotype (female paratype): total length 3.9 (4.6). Carapace length 2.2 (2.2), width 1.9 (1.8). Sternum length 0.9 (0.9), width 0.8 (0.8). Clypeus 0.13 (0.13). Eyes: AME 0.15 (0.15), ALE 0.08 (0.08), PME 0.13 (0.10), PLE 0.13 (0.1). Row of eyes: AME 0.38 (0.38), ALE 0.80 (0.85), PME 0.25 (0.28), PLE 0.95 (0.95). Legs (femur + patella/tibia + metatarsus + tarsus = total length): I 3.1 (2.3) + 3.7 (2.7) + 3.4 (2.2) + 1.2 (0.9) = 11.4 (8.1); II 2.6 (2.0) + 3.1 (2.3) + 3.0 (1.9) + 1.1 (0.9) = 9.8 (7.1); III 1.6 (1.5) + 1.7 (1.5) + 1.2 (0.9) + 0.7 (0.6) = 5.1 (4.5); IV 1.9 (1.7) + 2.0 (1.8) + 1.6 (1.4) + 0.7 (0.6) = 6.2 (5.5).

Distribution. This species occurs along the east coast of Australia and is most often collected in southeast Queensland and in the Richmond Ranges in the northeast of New South Wales ( Fig. 37 View FIGURE 37 ). Spiders have been collected as far north as Dalrymple Heights in Queensland, and as far south as Victoria, with a single specimen collected from Alfred National Park in far east Gippsland. The distribution overlaps with T. maudae   sp. nov. in some areas, with large populations of both species occurring sympatrically in Lamington National Park. This species also tends to be collected at areas of higher altitude along the Great Dividing Range.

Life history. The life history characteristics of T. joanae   sp. nov. are similar to those of T. maudae   sp. nov. The webs of the two species are indistinguishable in the field, and are often found on the same tree.

QM

Queensland Museum

SAM

South African Museum

AM

Australian Museum

ZMUC

Zoological Museum, University of Copenhagen

WAM

Western Australian Museum

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Arachnida

Order

Araneae

Family

Araneidae

Genus

Telaprocera