Telaprocera maudae, Harmer & Framenau, 2008

Harmer, Aaron M. T. & Framenau, Volker W., 2008, Telaprocera (Araneae: Araneidae), a new genus of Australian orb-web spiders with highly elongated webs, Zootaxa 1956 (1), pp. 59-80: 70-74

publication ID

http://doi.org/ 10.11646/zootaxa.1956.1.2

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5242468

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/FA57879D-FFC9-9450-D499-21489CE26FA2

treatment provided by

Felipe

scientific name

Telaprocera maudae
status

sp. nov.

Telaprocera maudae   sp. nov.

( Figs 18–27 View FIGURES 18–21 View FIGURES 22–26 View FIGURE 27 )

Type material. Holotype male, Lamington National Park , national park campground at Green Mountains section, Queensland, Australia, 28°13’49”S, 153°08’04”E, A.M.T. Harmer, March 2006 ( QM S83010 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   . Paratype female, same data ( QM S83011 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   .

Other material examined. AUSTRALIA: New South Wales: 1 male, Bruxner Park , 30°18’S, 153°07’E ( QM S83036 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, Bruxner Park, Orara East State Forest, Coffs Harbour , 30°14’S, 153°06’E ( SAM NN24378) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, same data, ( SAM NN24379) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, same data, ( SAM NN24380) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, Jamberoo Mountain , 34°39’S, 150°47’E ( AM KS34169) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, O’Sullivans Gap Rest area, Bullahdelah State Forest , 32°24’S, 152°15’E ( SAM NN24377) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, Richmond Range , 28°20’S, 152°55’E ( QM S83025 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, Royal National Park , 34°08’S, 151°04’E ( AM KS10777) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, ‘ Scalloway’, Willowvale, via Gerringong , 34°44’S, 150°47’E ( AM KS81895) GoogleMaps   ; 2 females, 1 juvenile, same data ( AM KS92767) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, same data ( AM KS81893) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, 3 juveniles, Stotts Island, Tweed River , 28°14’S, 153°31’E ( QM S83015 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, Yabbra State Forest , 28°40’S, 152°45’E ( QM S19477 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   . Queensland: 1 male, Atherton Plateau, Rose Gums Wilderness Retreat , 12.4 km 059 ENE of Malanda ( ZMUC)   ; 1 male, 1 female, 1 juvenile, Bakers Blue Mountain , 17km W Mt Molloy, 16°42’S, 145°10’E ( QM S34071 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, Bellenden Ker , 17°16’S, 145°51’E ( QM S26340 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, 1 female, Bellenden Ker, Massey Range , 4km W of centre, 17°16’S, 145°49’E ( QM S83470 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, Boloumba Creek ( QM S83023 View Materials )   ; 1 female, Boombana National Park , 27°24’8’’S, 152°47’22’’E ( QM S65295 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, 5 juveniles, Bulburin State Forest , 24°30’S, 151°35’E ( QM S83024 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 4 females, 17 juveniles, Bunya Mountains National Park, Dandabah , 26°53’S, 151°37’E ( QM S83028 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, 1 female, Bunya Mountains National Park, near Mt Krangarow , 26°51’S, 151°34’E ( QM S83021 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, Cathedral Tree , 17°12’S, 145°40’E ( QM S43277 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, 4 juveniles, Danbulla Scientific Reserve , 17°12’S, 145°40’E ( QM S46448 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, Danbulla State Forest , 17°10’S, 145°36’E ( ZMUC) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, Jimna Fire Tower , 26°40’S, 152°27’E ( QM S69352 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, 1 female, Kroombit Tops, Beauty Spot 98, 24°22’S, 151°01’E ( QM S83037 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 2 males, 6 females, 5 juveniles, Kroombit Tops, Three Moon Creek , 24°22’S, 151°01’E ( QM S83027 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, 1 juvenile, Kroombit Tops, Upper Kroombit Creek , 24°25’S, 151°03’E ( QM S83033 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, Lamington National Park, Binna Burra , 28°12’S, 153°11’E ( QM S80483 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, same data ( SAM NN24375) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, same data, ( SAM NN24376) GoogleMaps   ; 2 females, Lamington National Park, Daves Creek Country, 28°15’S, 153°08’E ( QM S83035 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, 1 juvenile, Lamington National Park, Nagarigoon , 28°12’S, 153°10’E ( QM S83026 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, Lamington National Park , national park campground, 28°13’49”S, 153°08’04”E ( WAM T85240 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, same data, 28°13’49”S, 153°08’04”E ( WAM T85241 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, Lamington National Park, O’Reillys , 28°14’S, 153°08’E ( QM S83029 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, Lamington National Park, O’Reillys Trail , 28°15’S, 153°09’E ( ZMUC) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, 2 juveniles, Majors Mountain , 17°38’S, 145°32’E ( QM S83020 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, Majors Mountain, Vine Creek Road, 17°40’58’’S, 145°32’02’’E ( QM S60261 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, Mt Bartle Frere , 17°23’S, 145°49’E ( QM S77008 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 2 males, 1 female, Mt Deongwar , 3km S, 27°13’41”S, 152°15’36”E ( QM S54190 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 2 females, Mt Elliot National Park, Upper North Creek , 19°29’S, 146°58’E ( QM S83031 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, 3 juveniles, Mt Finnigan , 15°49’S, 145°17’E ( QM S83032 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, 2 juveniles, Mt Goonaneman, near Childers , 25°26’S, 152°8’E ( QM S83030 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   , 1 male, Mt Graham , 8km N Abergowrie, 18°24’S, 145°52’E ( QM S83034 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 2 females, Mt Spurgeon, 4km NNE, Stewart Creek , 16°24’S, 145°13’E ( QM S58683 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, Mt Spurgeon, Sandy Creek , 16°28’S, 145°12’E ( QM S43342 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, Peeramon Scrub , 17°19’S, 145°37’E ( QM S38133 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, 19 juveniles, Searys Scrub, Cooloola National Park , 26°12’S, 153°03’E ( QM S83022 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 2 females, 3 juveniles, Swan Creek, Main River , 28°8’S, 152°20’E ( QM S47139 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 2 females, Tamborine National Park, Witches Falls , 27°56’27’’S, 153°10’48’’E ( ZMUC) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, same data ( ZMUC) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, The Crater , 25°03’S, 148°24’E ( QM S83019 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, The Crater, Mount Hypipamee National Park , 17°25’29”S, 145°29’00”E ( AM KS53314) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, Upper Brookfield , 27°30’S, 152°55’E ( QM S83016 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, 8 juveniles, same data ( QM S83017 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 3 males, 3 females, 12 juveniles, same data ( QM S83018 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 2 males, 2 females, Upper Leichardt Creek , 16°35’S, 145°16’E ( QM S43165 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 2 males, same data ( QM S75213 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, 2 juveniles, same data ( QM S75262 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, Windsor Tableland , 1.2km past barracks, 16°15’S, 145°02’E ( QM S54009 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, Windsor Tableland , barracks, 16°16’S, 145°03’E ( QM S43980 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   .

Etymology. The species is named in memory of the senior author’s paternal grandmother, Maud Harmer.

Diagnosis. This species is the larger of the two within the genus. However, in some instances sizes overlap, with smaller T. maudae   sp. nov. adults being approximately the same size as large T. joanae   sp. nov. adult females. Males have a large, shallow dish-shaped median apophysis, and a comparatively shorter, curved terminal apophysis ( Figs 4 View FIGURES 4–9 , 22, 23 View FIGURES 22–26 ), in contrast to T. joanae   sp. nov. in which the median apophysis is much smaller ( Figs 7 View FIGURES 4–9 , 32 View FIGURES 32–36 ), and the terminal apophysis is larger with a digitiform process ( Figs 9 View FIGURES 4–9 , 32, 33 View FIGURES 32–36 ). Females of T. maudae   sp. nov. are distinguished by a narrower epigyne, with the short, distal portion of the scape angled anteriorly, back away from the copulatory openings ( Figs 10 View FIGURES 10–15 , 24, 25 View FIGURES 22–26 ), in contrast to T. joanae   sp. nov. in which the epigyne is wider than long and the distal portion angled posteriorly ( Figs 11 View FIGURES 10–15 , 35 View FIGURES 32–36 ).

Description. Holotype male (Lamington National Park, QM S83010 View Materials ). Carapace orange-brown with darker bands around margins and posterior of cephalic region ( Fig. 18 View FIGURES 18–21 ). Fovea triangular with apex pointing anteriorly, and with a dark radiating pattern ( Fig. 18 View FIGURES 18–21 ). Moderately hirsute with fine white setae, more dense around carapace margins and eye region. Black rings around eyes. Chelicerae dark orange-brown with four promarginal teeth, apical tooth separated by width of one tooth, second tooth from proximal end much larger than others; three retromarginal teeth of similar size. Labium dark brown proximally, fading to white distally ( Fig. 19 View FIGURES 18–21 ). Sternum light brown with dark brown margin ( Fig. 19 View FIGURES 18–21 ). Abdomen dark brown, approximately round, but slightly tapered posteriorly, slightly longer than wide ( Fig. 18 View FIGURES 18–21 ). Small white markings on dorsal anterior surface of abdomen ( Fig. 18 View FIGURES 18–21 ). Indistinct horizontal band across abdomen posterior to small white markings, darker brown anteriorly of band, lighter brown posteriorly ( Fig. 18 View FIGURES 18–21 ). White dorsolateral patches visible at the ends of the horizontal band ( Fig. 18 View FIGURES 18–21 ). Faint scalloped markings visible on posterior lateral surface of abdomen. Legs pale yellow-brown with dark patches ( Figs 18, 19 View FIGURES 18–21 ). Tibiae I prolateral surface with a row of five short, very stout spines, tibiae II prolateral surface with two spines distally. Pedipalps with large dishshaped median apophysis ( Figs 4 View FIGURES 4–9 , 22 View FIGURES 22–26 ). Conductor elongate with cleft supporting short embolus, and proximal lobe adjacent to cleft ( Figs 4 View FIGURES 4–9 , 22 View FIGURES 22–26 ). Terminal apophysis short and curved basally ( Figs 4 View FIGURES 4–9 , 22, 23 View FIGURES 22–26 ).

Paratype female (Lamington National Park, QM S83011 View Materials ). Female somatic characters are as in male with the following exceptions: chelicerae with four promarginal teeth, apical tooth not separate as in male, apical tooth and second tooth from proximal end much larger than others. Abdomen much larger, more rounded, less tapered posteriorly, wider than long ( Fig. 20 View FIGURES 18–21 ). Tibiae I prolateral surface with a row of six short, very stout spines, tibiae II prolateral surface with a row of five spines. Epigyne in ventral view approximately as wide as long ( Fig. 24 View FIGURES 22–26 ), moderately hirsute. Small distal portion of scape curved back anteriorly away from copulatory openings, indistinct median septum continuous with small posterior plate ( Figs 10 View FIGURES 10–15 , 25 View FIGURES 22–26 ). Spermathecae relatively large, spherical in shape ( Figs 24, 26 View FIGURES 22–26 ).

Variation. Carapace may be pale yellow-brown instead of orange-brown, abdomen may be lighter brown, sometimes with greenish tinges. Small white markings on dorsal anterior surface of abdomen more pronounced in some individuals. White dorsolateral patches on abdomen may not be present in some individuals, scalloped pattern on abdomen posterior lateral surface may be more pronounced in some individuals. Male tibiae II variable in number of spines but less than tibiae I.

Measurements. Male holotype (female paratype): total length 5.6 (7.0). Carapace length 3.2 (3.4), width 2.7 (2.9). Sternum length 1.4 (1.5), width 1.2 (1.3). Clypeus 0.18 (0.20). Eyes: AME 0.20 (0.18), ALE 0.10 (0.10), PME 0.15 (0.15), PLE 0.14 (0.14). Row of eyes: AME 0.57 (0.60), ALE 1.17 (1.32), PME 0.45 (0.45), PLE 1.37 (1.52). Legs (femur + patella/tibia + metatarsus + tarsus = total length): I 4.3 (3.5) + 5.0 (4.2) + 3.8 (2.8) + 1.1 (1.0) = 14.2 (11.8); II 3.4 (3.0) + 3.9 (3.6) + 3.0 (2.5) + 1.1 (1.0) = 11.4 (10.1); III 2.2 (2.1) + 2.0 (2.1) + 1.5 (1.2) + 0.9 (0.9) = 6.6 (6.3); IV 2.6 (2.6) + 2.6 (2.8) + 2.0 (2.0) + 0.8 (0.9) = 8.0 (8.3).

Distribution. This species is found along the east coast of Australia from Mt Finnigan in far north Queensland, to Willowvale in southeast New South Wales ( Fig. 27 View FIGURE 27 ), although it appears to occur more frequently in Queensland. It is often collected from areas of higher altitude along the Great Dividing Range.

Life history. Telaprocera maudae   sp. nov. of all ages, from first instar to adult, are found year round in at least some parts of the species’ distribution, such as Lamington National Park in southeast Queensland. There appear to be overlapping generations in this area, however, the phenology in other parts of the distribution is unknown. The ladder-webs of these spiders range from about two to seven times taller than wide, and are always built against the trunk of a tree. Webs are not rebuilt every night, but only after several days, presumably when there is substantial damage, or when the silk is no longer sticky. Webs are generally built early in the evening, although webs were occasionally observed being built closer to dawn. The spiders emerge from hiding at dusk and remain at the hub of the web until dawn, only moving in response to prey that has become entangled in the web. Adult males occasionally build webs and are also found sitting at the top of adult female webs. It is uncertain whether these males are guarding recently mated females, or waiting for females to become sexually receptive.

QM

Queensland Museum

SAM

South African Museum

AM

Australian Museum

ZMUC

Zoological Museum, University of Copenhagen

WAM

Western Australian Museum

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Arachnida

Order

Araneae

Family

Araneidae

Genus

Telaprocera