Panthea, Hubner, 1820

Anweiler, Gary G., 2009, Revision of the New World Panthea Hübner (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae) with descriptions of 5 new species and 2 new subspecies, ZooKeys 9 (9), pp. 97-134: 100-102

publication ID

http://doi.org/ 10.3897/zookeys.9.157

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:20B00870-7416-4583-ADE0-4302E5571B66

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3792300

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/F544023F-5B56-FFEF-19AF-007C2C64FD23

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Panthea
status

 

Key to the New World Panthea  

1 Antenna bipectinate (male)......................................................................... 2

– Antenna simple (female) (Note: female of P. reducta   unknown) ............... 12

2 Hindwing black except fringe, scales tiny, hair-like exposing membrane, appearing glassy (label can be read through wing); Caribbean: Hispaniola ( Fig. 3 View Figures 1-11 ).......................................................................................... P. reducta  

– Hindwing with white scales, or if without white scales dark scales not greatly reduced, wing opaque ................................................................................. 3

3 Small (FW length 14-15 mm); wing pattern blurred or appearing out of focus; uncus obsolete ( Fig. 45 View Figures 44-49 ); aedeagus without sclerotized cornuti, but armed with patch of many soft fleshy-appearing spines ( Figs. 1 View Figures 1-11 , 45 View Figures 44-49 ) ............. .................................................................................................. P. apanthea  

– Larger (FW length 16 mm or more); wings with lines clear, contrasting; uncus present; aedeagus armed with 1-2 large sclerotized cornuti ( Figs. 46-57 View Figures 44-49 View Figures 50-57 )....... 4

4 Terminus of uncus bifurcate ( Fig. 48 View Figures 44-49 ) .......................................... P. gigantea  

– Terminus of uncus not bifurcate; square, rounded or pointed ( Figs. 46, 47, 49-57 View Figures 44-49 View Figures 50-57 ) ........................................................................................................ 5

5 Everted vesica long, narrow, 3-5 × long as wide ( Figs. 54-56 View Figures 50-57 )...................... 6

– Everted vesica short, bulbous, 1-2 × long as wide ( Figs. 46-53 View Figures 44-49 View Figures 50-57 ) ................... 8

6 Vesica with large bent or curved terminal cornutus ( Fig. 56 View Figures 50-57 ); sw USA.......... ......................................................................................................... P. greyi  

– Vesica with large straight terminal cornutus ( Figs. 54-55 View Figures 50-57 ); eastern USA and Canada....................................................................................................... 7

7 Vesica with second smaller cornutus near base of vesica ( Figs. 55, 57 View Figures 50-57 ), southeastern USA ( Fig. 71 View Fig ) .................................................... P. furcilla australis  

– Vesica without second cornutus ( Fig. 54 View Figures 50-57 ); eastern USA and Canada ( Fig. 71 View Fig ) (Note: specimens from zone where furcilla   and australis meet show intermediate characters) ............................................................... P. furcilla furcilla  

8 Vesica with large curved claw-like basal cornutus and finger-like diverticulum with a small straight terminal cornutus ( Fig. 50 View Figures 50-57 )..................... P. virginarius  

– Vesica without finger-like diverticulum ( Figs. 46-49 View Figures 44-49 ) (Note: some specimens of virginarius   from Wyoming and southern Idaho may have a greatly reduced diverticulum with a very small or obsolete spine) ( Fig. 51 View Figures 50-57 ).......................... 9

9 Vesica with two large, curved, approximately equal-sized cornuti ( Fig. 59 View Figures 58-68 ) ... ................................................................................................ P. guatemala  

– Vesica with two prominent cornuti, one much smaller in size ( Figs. 46 View Figures 44-49 ; 52- 53 View Figures 50-57 )............................................................................................................ 10

10 Vesica with one short curved cornutus and one long, thin, straight or recurved cornutus; clasper simple, not scoop-shaped or forked ( Figs. 52-53 View Figures 50-57 ) 11

– Vesica with large basal and small terminal cornutus; large scoop-shaped clasper ( Fig. 46 View Figures 44-49 ) ............................................................................. P. judyae  

11 Wings with prominent white areas ( Figs. 36-38 View Figures 28-43 ); eastern and boreal North America ( Fig. 71 View Fig ).......................................... P. acronyctoides acronyctoides  

– Wings without prominent white areas, or if white area present, confined to small areas of outer edge of FW postmedian line and anal angle of HW ( Figs. 40-43 View Figures 28-43 ); Rocky Mountains and foothills ( Fig. 71 View Fig ) ........................... .................................................................................. P. acronyctoides nigra  

12 Sterigma vestigial or obsolete ( Fig. 58 View Figures 58-68 ); sw USA......................... P. apanthea  

– Sterigma well developed ( Figs. 59-68 View Figures 58-68 )....................................................... 13

13 Corpus bursae with thick-walled opaque upper and thin-walled translucent lower sections ( Figs. 65-68 View Figures 58-68 )....................................................................... 14

– Corpus bursae single, an oval or oblong, thin-walled translucent sac ( Figs. 59-64 View Figures 58-68 ) ...................................................................................................... 16

14 Ductus bursae narrow, finely folded or “corrugated,” expanding abruptly to corpus bursae ( Figs. 65-67 View Figures 58-68 ); eastern USA and Canada.............................. 15

– Ductus bursae wider, with large folds, widening gradually and with folds extending onto upper section of corpus bursae ( Fig. 68 View Figures 58-68 ); sw USA ( Fig. 71 View Fig )...... ......................................................................................................... P. greyi  

15 Ductus bursae strap-like, few twists and folds ( Fig. 67 View Figures 58-68 ); east and se USA ( Fig. 71 View Fig )......................................................................... P. furcilla australis  

– Ductus bursae not strap-like, with many finer “corrugated” folds ( Fig. 65 View Figures 58-68 ); northeastern USA and Canada ( Fig. 71 View Fig ) (Note: specimens of ssp. australis   and furcilla   show intermediate characters where the ranges meet) ........................ ........................................................................................ P. furcilla furcilla  

16 Sterigma massive, heavily sclerotized ( Figs. 58-61 View Figures 58-68 ).................................... 17

– Sterigma not massive, only moderately sclerotized ( Figs. 62-64 View Figures 58-68 ) ............... 19

17 Ductus bursae heavily sclerotized to or almost to corpus bursae ( Fig. 61 View Figures 58-68 )...... ................................................................................................ P. guatemala  

– Ductus bursae with heavily sclerotized part extending no more than half way to corpus bursae ( Figs. 59-60 View Figures 58-68 )................................................................... 18

18 Ductus bursae between sterigma and corpus bursae narrow; corpus bursae tear-drop or oval shape ( Fig. 59 View Figures 58-68 ); FW length less than 25 mm ....... P. judyae  

– Ductus bursae below sterigma wide; corpus bursae oblong ( Fig. 60 View Figures 58-68 ); FW length greater than 25 mm .......................................................... P. gigantea  

19 Ductus bursae slightly curved, smooth, with expanded rim at ostium ( Figs. 63-64 View Figures 58-68 ) ..................................................................................................... 20

– Ductus bursae straight, wrinkled, without expanded rim at ostium ( Fig. 62 View Figures 58-68 ) ............................................................................................... P. virginarius  

20 Wings with prominent white areas ( Figs. 36-38 View Figures 28-43 ); eastern and boreal North America ( Fig. 72 View Fig ) ......................................... P. acronyctoides acronyctoides  

– Wings without prominent white areas ( Figs. 40-43 View Figures 28-43 ); Rocky Mountains and foothills ( Fig. 69 View Fig ) (Note: specimens of acronyctoides   show intermediate characters in central Alberta) ........................................... P. acronyctoides nigra