Guadana, Rheims, 2010

Rheims, Cristina A., 2021, The Neotropical genera Guadana Rheims, 2010 and Sparianthina Banks, 1929 (Araneae: Sparassidae: Heteropodinae), Zootaxa 5061 (3), pp. 401-431 : 402-403

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.5061.3.1

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:14E73644-BF88-4999-887D-827553A372E1

DOI

https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5700062

persistent identifier

https://treatment.plazi.org/id/D57D87F8-5741-2E7C-FF5B-F8D9A1E7F9CF

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Guadana
status

 

Identification key for all known species of Guadana

1 Males .............................................................................................. 2

- Females........................................................................................... 11

2(1) Embolus gently curved retrolaterally, without basal projection ( Figs 74−76 View FIGURES 67−76 )....................................... 3

- Embolus strongly curved prolaterally, with basal projection ( Figs 67−73 View FIGURES 67−76 )......................................... 5

3(2) DTA with ridged margin and no keels ( Figs 62−63 View FIGURES 57−66 ).......................................................... 4

- DTA with smooth margins and long ventral keel ( Fig. 64 View FIGURES 57−66 , Rheims 2010a: fig. 29)........................ G. tambopata

4(3) Ridged margin long, with several ridges (more than 10) distributed throughout more than half DTA length ( Fig. 63 View FIGURES 57−66 , Rheims 2010a: fig. 24); dRTA distally bifid ( Rheims 2010a: fig. 25)............................................. G. quillu

- Ridged margin short, with few ridges (4 or 5) distributed along less than ¼ DTA length ( Fig. 62 View FIGURES 57−66 , Rheims 2010a: fig. 22); dRTA distally trifid (best seen in retrolateral view) ( Rheims 2010a: fig. 23).................................. G. panguana

5(2) Conductor distally widened ( Fig. 32 View FIGURES 29−33 , Rheims 2010a: fig. 34)................................................... 6

- Conductor with the same width throughout its entire length ( Figs 2 View FIGURES 1−5 , 18 View FIGURES 15−19 , 44 View FIGURES 43−47 )....................................... 7

6(5) dRTA bearing two small, thorn-like projections at tip ( Figs 32 View FIGURES 29−33 , 41 View FIGURES 38−42 ); embolus with basal projection membranous at center ( Figs 32 View FIGURES 29−33 , 41 View FIGURES 38−42 , 72 View FIGURES 67−76 ).............................................................................. G. ucayali sp. n.

- dRTA bearing single hook-like projection at tip ( Rheims 2010a: fig. 34); embolus with basal projection sclerotized ( Fig. 76 View FIGURES 67−76 , Rheims 2010a: fig. 34).......................................................................... G. urucu

7(5) Embolus with basal projection single ( Figs 67−69, 71−73 View FIGURES 67−76 ).................................................... 8

- Embolus with basal projection bifid with one branch blunt, with long prolateral fold and another distally widened, with pointed tip ( Figs 44 View FIGURES 43−47 , 53 View FIGURES 52−56 , 70 View FIGURES 67−76 ).................................................................. G. muirapinima sp. n.

8(7) Embolus tip with sub-distal keel ( Figs 67−68 View FIGURES 67−76 )............................................................... 9

- Embolus tip with subdistal projection ( Figs 69, 71 View FIGURES 67−76 ).......................................................... 10

9(8) vRTA and dRTA similar sized in retrolateral view ( Figs 19 View FIGURES 15−19 , 28 View FIGURES 24−28 ); embolus with basal projection with jagged margin ( Figs 18 View FIGURES 15−19 , 27 View FIGURES 24−28 , 68 View FIGURES 67−76 ).................................................................................... G. arawak sp. n.

- vRTA smaller than dRTA in retrolateral view ( Fig. 2−3 View FIGURES 1−5 ); embolus with basal projection with smooth margin ( Figs 2 View FIGURES 1−5 , 11 View FIGURES 10−14 , 67 View FIGURES 67−76 )..................................................................................... G. alpahuayo sp. n.

10(8) dRTA slender, hook-shaped and vRTA triangular (in ventral view) ( Rheims 2010a: fig. 20); embolus with basal projection wider than long ( Fig. 71 View FIGURES 67−76 , Rheims 2010a: fig. 20).......................................................... G. neblina

- dRTA wide, medially bent at roughly 90° and vRTA (in retrolateral view) squared (in ventral view) ( Rheims 2010a: figs 13−14); embolus with basal projection longer than wide ( Fig. 69 View FIGURES 67−76 , Rheims 2010a: fig. 13)......................... G. manauara

11(1) MS without epigynal pockets ( Rheims 2010a: figs 26, 31).................................................... 12

- MS bearing medial or anterior epigynal pockets ( Figs 4 View FIGURES 1−5 , 15 View FIGURES 15−19 , 29 View FIGURES 29−33 , Rheims 2010a: 17)................................ 13

12(11) Epigynal ledges running posteriorly to half the epigyne length, then curving laterally; MS with median U-shaped flaps ( Rheims 2010a: fig. 31); internal ducts strongly convoluted close to FD ( Rheims 2010a: fig. 32)................... G. tambopata

- Epigynal ledges running posteriorly and curving anteriorly close to posterior margin; MS smooth ( Rheims 2010a: fig. 26); internal ducts slightly widened close to FD ( Rheims 2010a: fig. 29)....................................... G. quillu

13(11) MS with paired epigynal pockets ( Figs 4 View FIGURES 1−5 , 15 View FIGURES 15−19 , Rheims 2010a: fig. 17)........................................... 14

- MS with single epigynal pocket ( Figs 29 View FIGURES 29−33 , 46 View FIGURES 43−47 , Rheims 2010a: fig. 36)........................................... 16

14(13) MS with epigynal pockets connected medially, opening anteriorly ( Fig. 4 View FIGURES 1−5 ; Rheims 2010a: fig. 17); internal ducts running medially from CO, then posteriorly to SP ( Fig. 5 View FIGURES 1−5 ; Rheims 2010a: fig. 19)........................................... 15

- MS with epigynal pockets not connected medially, opening posteriorly ( Figs 15 View FIGURES 15−19 , 24 View FIGURES 24−28 ); internal ducts running anteriorly from CO then posteriorly to SP ( Figs 16 View FIGURES 15−19 , 25 View FIGURES 24−28 )........................................................ G. amendoim sp. n.

15(14) MS roughly rectangular, slightly wider anteriorly; epigynal pockets roughly two times wider than long ( Figs 4 View FIGURES 1−5 , 13 View FIGURES 10−14 )............................................................................................ G. alpahuayo sp. n.

- MS roughly trapezoid, widest posteriorly; epigynal pockets roughly four times wider than long ( Rheims 2010a: fig. 17)............................................................................................. G. manauara

16(13) MS with epigynal pockets as wide as long or slightly longer than wide ( Figs 29 View FIGURES 29−33 , 38 View FIGURES 38−42 ; Rheims 2010a: fig. 36)............ 17

- MS with epigynal pockets much wider than long ( Figs 46 View FIGURES 43−47 , 55 View FIGURES 52−56 )................................ G. muirapinima sp. n.

17(16) MS at least three times wider anteriorly with curved epigynal ledges ( Rheims 2010a: 36); internal ducts running mediad, then posteriad, then laterad from CO to slightly convoluted SP ( Rheims 2010a: fig. 37)........................... G. urucu

- MS one and a half times wider anteriorly without curved epigynal ledges ( Figs 29 View FIGURES 29−33 , 38 View FIGURES 38−42 ); internal ducts running sinuously posteriad towards U-shaped SP ( Figs 30 View FIGURES 29−33 , 39 View FIGURES 38−42 )........................................................ G. mapia sp. n.

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Arachnida

Order

Araneae

Family

Sparassidae