Haemaphysalis kitaokai Hoogstraal, 1969

Guglielmone, Alberto A., Petney, Trevor N. & Robbins, Richard G., 2020, Ixodidae (Acari: Ixodoidea): descriptions and redescriptions of all known species from 1758 to December 31, 2019, Zootaxa 4871 (1), pp. 1-322: 172

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4871.1.1

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:C21A719F-9A6B-4227-8386-1AFA22620614

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4583500

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/C04787D4-FF42-FF69-FF07-FCB86643CEA2

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Haemaphysalis kitaokai Hoogstraal, 1969
status

 

77. Haemaphysalis kitaokai Hoogstraal, 1969   .

An Oriental and Palearctic species whose adults and nymphs have been found on Artiodactyla   : Bovidae   and Cervidae   ; adult ticks alone have been recovered from Perissodactyla   : Equidae   , and Galliformes   : Phasianidae   ; larvae have been found on Rodentia   : Muridae   . Haemaphysalis kitaokai   is a very rare parasite of humans.

M: Keegan and Toshioka (1957), under the name Haemaphysalis inermis   , as explained in Hoogstraal (1969)

F: Keegan and Toshioka (1957), under the name Haemaphysalis inermis   , as explained in Hoogstraal (1969)

N: Kitaoka and Mori (1967), under the name Haemaphysalis ambigua   , a synonym of Haemaphysalis inermis   , as explained in Hoogstraal (1969)

L: Kitaoka and Mori (1967), under the name Haemaphysalis ambigua   , as explained in Hoogstraal (1969) Redescriptions

M: Yamaguti et al. (1971), Yamaguti and Kitaoka (1980), Yamaguti (1981), Teng and Jiang (1991), Yamauchi and Takada (2015)

F: Yamaguti et al. (1971), Yamaguti and Kitaoka (1980), Yamaguti (1981), Teng and Jiang (1991), Yamauchi and Takada (2015)

N: Yamaguti et al. (1971), Kitaoka (1985), Teng and Jiang (1991)

L: Yamaguti et al. (1971), Kitaoka (1985), Teng and Jiang (1991), Fujita and Takada (2007)

Note: Camicas et al. (1998) treat Haemaphysalis kitaokai   as a Palearctic species, but Teng and Jiang (1991) found it in both Oriental and Palearctic localities in China. Li et al. (2018) present molecular evidence to hypothesize that more than one species may exist under the name Haemaphysalis kitaokai   . See also Haemaphysalis inermis   for data concerning its confusion with Haemaphysalis kitaokai   .