Namea brisbanensis Raven, 1984

Rix, Michael G., Wilson, Jeremy D. & Harvey, Mark S., 2020, The open-holed trapdoor spiders (Mygalomorphae: Anamidae: Namea) of Australia’s D’Aguilar Range: revealing an unexpected subtropical hotspot of rainforest diversity, Zootaxa 4861 (1), pp. 71-91: 77-78

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4861.1.5

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:44321429-80FA-45AC-90D6-E3E13C961BFC

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4414528

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/BA1BE531-FFA8-C404-FF21-FD43BEDAFE12

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Namea brisbanensis Raven, 1984
status

 

Namea brisbanensis Raven, 1984  

( Figs 4 View FIGURES 4–12 , 13 View FIGURE 13 , 18 View FIGURES 14–21 a–c)

Namea brisbanensis Raven, 1984: 12   , figs 4, 26, 36, 48, 71, 91, 104. Rix et al., 2020: 697 View Cited Treatment , figs 2–4, 10, 12, 16–28.

Namea flavomaculata (Rainbow & Pulleine)   : Raven, 1984: 31, figs 12, 70, 49, 93 (in part, description and illustrations of male specimen QMB S1191 from Mount Tamborine; see Rix et al., 2020: 701).

Type material. AUSTRALIA: Queensland: male holotype, Brookfield , 100 m, 7 March 1979, T. Roe ( QMB S767 View Materials )   . Paratypes: 1 male, same data as holotype except 25 January 1979 ( QMB S769 View Materials )   ; 1 male, 1 female, same data except 27 March 1981, R. Roe, R. Raven ( QMB S770 View Materials )   ; 1 female (allotype), Mount Coot-tha , 18 April 1977, R. Raven ( QMB S768 View Materials )   .

Select material examined. Australia: Queensland: 1 female, Upper Brookfield, Gold Creek Reserve, Gold Creek , off Gold Creek Walking Trail, 27°27’37”S, 152°53’01”E, hand collected from burrow, dry rainforest gully, 101 m, 20 January 2019, M. Rix, J. Wilson ( QMB S S111355 DNA) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, same data ( QMB S S111356 DNA) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, D’Aguilar National Park, Mount Mee section, 27°05’10”S, 152°41’14”E, hand collected from burrow, rainforest, 532 m, 18 February 2019, M. Rix, J. Wilson ( QMB S111389 View Materials DNA) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, same data except 27°05’00”S, 152°41’20”E, 528 m ( QMB S111391 View Materials DNA) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, same data ( QMB S111392 View Materials DNA) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, same data except 27°04’21”S, 152°41’07”E, mixed forest, 478 m ( QMB S111395 View Materials DNA) GoogleMaps   ; 1 female, same data except The Mill Rainforest Walk , 27°04’54”S, 152°42’36”E, rainforest, 293 m ( QMB S111397 View Materials DNA) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, Enoggera Reservoir , site 2, 27°27’S, 152°55’E, pitfall trap, open forest, 125 m, 15 March–18 May 2000, G. Monteith ( QMB S63069 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; 1 male, Mount Mee , 14 February 1993, K. Cook ( QMB S25512 View Materials )   ; 1 male, same data except 7 March 1992 ( QMB S20324 View Materials )   ; 2 males, Mount Nebo , 500 m, March 1992, C. Carbine ( QMB S10207 View Materials )   .

Diagnosis. Males of Namea brisbanensis   can be distinguished from those of all other described congeners except N. gowardae   by the morphology of tibia I, which has the standard brisbanensis   -complex prolateral/ventral spination pattern (2pd–2pv–3v), plus a short macroseta v1 and largely asetose proventral ‘tibial bald zone’ between macrosetae pv1 and pv2 ( Fig. 18a View FIGURES 14–21 ; cf. Figs 42, 44 View FIGURES 35–44 ). Males can be further distinguished from those of N. gowardae   by the broadly pyriform shape of the palpal bulb ( Fig. 18b View FIGURES 14–21 ; cf. Figs 45–47 View FIGURES 45–47 ), the broader profile of tibia I ( Fig. 18a View FIGURES 14–21 ; cf. Fig. 44 View FIGURES 35–44 ; see also Rix et al. 2020, fig. 25), and the more strongly concave ventro-distal excavation anterior to macroseta v1 ( Fig. 18a View FIGURES 14–21 ; cf. Fig. 44 View FIGURES 35–44 ; see also Rix et al. 2020, fig. 25).

Females are very similar in general appearance to those of N. gowardae   ( Fig. 4 View FIGURES 4–12 ; cf. Fig. 5 View FIGURES 4–12 ), but can be distinguished by the shape of the receptacula, which are longer, ‘sausage-shaped’ and are each without a clearly defined fundus ( Fig. 18c View FIGURES 14–21 ; cf. Fig. 19c View FIGURES 14–21 ; see also Raven 1984, fig. 104).

Distribution. Namea brisbanensis   is an unusually widespread species, recorded from numerous low to mid-elevation rainforest sites in south-eastern Queensland, from the Conondale National Park south to near the Queensland / New South Wales border ( Rix et al. 2020). On the D’Aguilar Range it is a common species, known from Brookfield (the type locality), Gold Creek, Enoggera Reservoir, Mount Coot-tha, Mount Nebo and Mount Mee ( Fig. 2 View FIGURES 1–3 ).

Remarks. This species is one of three Namea   on the D’Aguilar Range which have a broader distribution in south-eastern Queensland. The spiders are usually the most abundant of Namea   species on the range, where their open burrows can be found in rainforest, wet sclerophyll and riparian habitats. At some sites, N. brisbanensis   is syntopic with N. nigritarsus   and N. salanitri   , and in the Maiala region of Mount Glorious it is seemingly replaced by populations of N. gowardae   , the latter of which can only be properly (but nonetheless easily) distinguished upon close examination of the male or female genitalia, or by using molecular sequencing methods. Males, like most other members of the brisbanensis   -complex, have densely setose gold abdomens and highly reflective gold setae on the leg femora (e.g. see Rix et al. 2020, fig. 10), and appear to be active during summer and autumn, presumably in response to seasonal rain events.

QMB

Queensland Museum, Brisbane

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Arachnida

Order

Araneae

Family

Nemesiidae

Genus

Namea

Loc

Namea brisbanensis Raven, 1984

Rix, Michael G., Wilson, Jeremy D. & Harvey, Mark S. 2020
2020
Loc

Namea brisbanensis

Rix, M. G. & Wilson, J. D. & Harvey, M. S. 2020: 697
Raven, R. J. 1984: 12
1984