Namea salanitri Raven, 1984

Rix, Michael G., Wilson, Jeremy D. & Harvey, Mark S., 2020, The open-holed trapdoor spiders (Mygalomorphae: Anamidae: Namea) of Australia’s D’Aguilar Range: revealing an unexpected subtropical hotspot of rainforest diversity, Zootaxa 4861 (1), pp. 71-91: 83-84

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4861.1.5

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:44321429-80FA-45AC-90D6-E3E13C961BFC

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4414542

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/BA1BE531-FFA2-C40E-FF21-F9B9BF28FD6A

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Namea salanitri Raven, 1984
status

 

Namea salanitri Raven, 1984  

( Figs 6 View FIGURES 4–12 , 13 View FIGURE 13 , 20 View FIGURES 14–21 a–c)

Namea salanitri Raven, 1984: 42   , figs 3, 28, 33, 42, 66, 84, 97, 116, 129. Rix et al., 2020: 703 View Cited Treatment , figs 2, 3, 8, 15, 68–80.

Type material. AUSTRALIA: Queensland: male holotype, Mount Mee (GM89), pitfall trap, rainforest, 550 m, 28.x.1977 – 20.i.1978, G. & S. Monteith ( QMB S1166 View Materials )   . Paratypes: 1 female (allotype), same data as holotype ( QMB S1167 View Materials )   ; 2 males, same data ( QMB S1176 View Materials )   ; 1 female, same data except 26 June–30 October 1978 ( QMB S1177 View Materials )   ; 1 male, 1 female, same data except (GM14), 520 m, 17 August–9 November 1974 ( QMB S1175 View Materials )   .

Select material examined. Australia: Queensland: 1 female, D’Aguilar National Park, Mount Mee section, The Mill Rainforest Walk , 27°04’54”S, 152°42’36”E, hand collected from burrow, rainforest, 293 m, 18 February 2019, M. Rix, J. Wilson ( QMB S111396 View Materials DNA) GoogleMaps   ; 2 males, Mount Glorious , in earth trench, 15 June 1997, A. Hiller ( QMB S35331 View Materials )   .

Diagnosis. Males of Namea salanitri   can be distinguished from those of all other described congeners by the morphology of the embolus, which is short, strongly curved and positioned sub-terminally on the palpal bulb ( Fig. 20b View FIGURES 14–21 ; see also Rix et al. 2020, figs 78–80).

Females are similar in general appearance to those of other large species in the brisbanensis   complex ( Fig. 6 View FIGURES 4–12 ; cf. Figs 4, 5 View FIGURES 4–12 ), but can be distinguished by the short receptacula ( Fig. 20c View FIGURES 14–21 ; cf. Figs 18c, 19c View FIGURES 14–21 ), the presence of unusual, ear-like epigastric lobes ( Fig. 20c View FIGURES 14–21 ; see also Raven 1984, fig. 129), and lighter, honey-red leg femora in life ( Fig. 6 View FIGURES 4–12 ; cf. Figs 4, 5 View FIGURES 4–12 ).

Distribution. Namea salanitri   is a widespread species in south-eastern Queensland, where it has been recorded from scattered mid- to high elevation rainforest sites to the north, west and south-west of Brisbane ( Rix et al. 2020). On the D’Aguilar Range it is known from Mount Mee (the type locality) and Mount Glorious ( Fig. 2 View FIGURES 1–3 ).

Remarks. This species is one of three Namea   on the D’Aguilar Range which have a broader distribution in south-eastern Queensland. The spiders are not abundant on the range, and are restricted to rainforest habitats. At some sites, N. salanitri   is syntopic with N. brisbanensis   and N. nigritarsus   , although both males and females of N. salanitri   are easy to distinguish from other congeners morphologically. Little is known of its biology or life history, other than that males appear to be active in winter and spring.

QMB

Queensland Museum, Brisbane

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Arachnida

Order

Araneae

Family

Nemesiidae

Genus

Namea

Loc

Namea salanitri Raven, 1984

Rix, Michael G., Wilson, Jeremy D. & Harvey, Mark S. 2020
2020
Loc

Namea salanitri

Rix, M. G. & Wilson, J. D. & Harvey, M. S. 2020: 703
Raven, R. J. 1984: 42
1984