Tanapseudes sinensis Bamber, 2000

DRUMM, DAVID T. & HEARD, RICHARD W., 2011, Systematic revision of the family Kalliapseudidae (Crustacea: Tanaidacea), Zootaxa 3142 (1), pp. 1-172: 156-159

publication ID

http://doi.org/ 10.11646/zootaxa.3142.1.1

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/AF5F87C3-DEF0-FF68-B19F-C680FCA6941C

treatment provided by

Felipe

scientific name

Tanapseudes sinensis Bamber, 2000
status

 

Tanapseudes sinensis Bamber, 2000  

(Figs 109–110)

Tanapseudes sinensis Bamber, 2000: 45   , Figs. 4–6. Guţu and Angsupanich, 2005: 51, 52, 54.

Material examined. Allotype: adult female, NHM 1998.2551, Tai Tam Bay , Hong Kong, 22°13'N, 114°14'E, 30m, coll. R.G. Ongche, det. R. Bamber, July, 1993. GoogleMaps  

Diagnosis. Pleonites with less than five lateral plumose setae. Pleotelson rounded posteriorly. Male pereopod

1 with long dorsodistal spiniform seta on propodus. Male cheliped carpus lacking ventrodistal rounded protuberance. Pereopods 2–5 with ventral margins of merus and carpus not heavily setose. Uropod basal article with inner distal spiniform projection.

Type locality. South China Sea ( Fig. 100)   .

Remarks. Hansknecht et al. (2002) synonymized T. sinensis   with T. ormuzana   , but Guţu and Angsupanich (2005) revalidated it. This is the largest species of Tanapseudes   (> 3 mm) and can be distinguished from the other two congeners by the uropod basal article having a spiniform projection on the inner distal corner ( Fig. 110D).

Ecology. Little is known of the ecology of most members of Kalliapseudidae   . The feeding behavior of two species [ P. granulosus   (subfamily Tanapseudinae   ) and M. macsweenyi   (subfamily Kalliapseudinae   )], which distinctly differ in mouthpart morphology, was described by Drumm (2005). Based on the observations of Drumm (2005), M. macsweenyi   constructs “tubes” in soft sediments using mucus secretions and feeds by filtering detritus and diatoms with plumose setae attached to the chelipeds and maxillipeds. In contrast P. granulosus   , which lacks a permanent domicile, appears to be fossorial and feeds by scraping the organic material (e.g. microflora) off sand particles (Drumm, 2005).

A vast majority of the species within the suborder Apseudomorpha   appear to be fossorial (e.g., Apseudidae   , Sphyrapidae   ) or epibenthic (e.g., some Pagurapseudidae   and Metapseudidae   ). In contrast, some members of the families Kalliapseudidae   ( Kalliapseudinae   ), Parapseudidae Guţu, 1981   , and possibly the small and poorly known Numbakullidae Guţu   and Heard, 2002 appear to occupy permanent or semipermanent tubes or burrows. Members of the parapseudid genera Discapseudes Băcescu and Guţu, 1975   and Halmyrapseudes Băcescu and Guţu, 1974   construct well–developed tubes (Băcescu and Guţu, 1974, 1975; R. Heard, pers. obser.). However, there can be different interpretations of whether or not members of the subfamily Kalliapseudinae   are tube or burrow dwellers, or both. Based on the authors’ personal observations and those of Drumm (2005), we consider M. macsweenyi   to be a burrow–lining that remains intact. Members of the Kalliapseudinae   appear to be suspension or filter feeders occupying permanent domiciles in soft–bottom substrata (e.g., sand, sand–silt, mud). In contrast, members of the subfamilies Hemikalliapseudinae   and Tanapseudinae   , which are also known from soft–bottom habitats, appear to be fossorial deposit feeders that lack permanent domiciles.

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Malacostraca

Order

Tanaidacea

Family

Kalliapseudidae

Genus

Tanapseudes

Loc

Tanapseudes sinensis Bamber, 2000

DRUMM, DAVID T. & HEARD, RICHARD W. 2011
2011
Loc

Tanapseudes sinensis

Gutu, M. & Angsupanich, S. 2005: 51
Bamber, R. N. 2000: 45
2000