Stigmella scutellariae Remeikis & Stonis

Stonis, Jonas R., Remeikis, Andrius, Diškus, Arūnas, Forero, Dimitri & Torres, Nixon Cumbicus, 2017, A report on Lamiaceae-feeding Nepticulidae (Lepidoptera) from South America, Zootaxa 4338 (1): -

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4338.1.6

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:C5DBF69A-EB43-4730-8176-2B5A232A1AC2

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/9C660D0C-BE1A-FFC4-CB87-C763FBBDFE4E

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Stigmella scutellariae Remeikis & Stonis
status

sp. nov.

Stigmella scutellariae Remeikis & Stonis   , sp. nov.

( Figs 18–22 View FIGURES 13 – 22 , 40–57 View FIGURES 40 – 45 View FIGURES 46 – 53 View FIGURES 54 – 57 )

Type material. Holotype: ♂, ECUADOR, Loja Province, Vilcabamba, 4°15'44"S, 79°13'53"W, elevation 1800 m, 14.ii.2014, mining larvae on Scutellaria volubilis, A. Remeikis & J. R. Stonis   , genitalia slide no. RA 653♂ ( ZMUC). Paratypes: 3 ♂, 3 ♀, same label data, genitalia slide nos RA 654♀, RA 655♀ ( ZMUC); 1 ♀, Vilcabamba, 4°16'31"S, 79°11'35"W, elevation 1820 m, mining larvae on Scutellaria volubilis   , 22.i.2017, field card no. 5223, A. Diškus ( ZMUC).

Diagnosis. Externally, adults of the new species resemble many other Andean Stigmella   species as possessing fascia on forewing but differ from these species in the grey, silvery glossy collar. In the male genitalia, the combination of two very large apical processes of valva, a very long vinculum ( Fig. 50 View FIGURES 46 – 53 ), triangular processes of transtilla, and a stout uncus distinguishes Stigmella scutellariae   sp. nov. from all other Stigmella   . The host plant Scutellaria volubilis   also makes this species highly distinctive.

Male ( Fig. 19 View FIGURES 13 – 22 ). Forewing length about 2.0– 2.1 mm; wingspan about 4.5–4.6 mm. Head: palpi cream to grey, glossy; frontal tuft ferruginous; collar grey, silvery glossy; scape white to cream, very glossy; antenna slightly longer than half the length of forewing; flagellum with about 35 segments, dark grey with some purple iridescence on upper side and underside. Thorax and tegula dull brass to brown. Forewing: area proximal to fascia dull brass or bronze shading into dark brown with some purple iridescence; fascia postmedian, silvery, widening on tornus; area distal to fascia dark brown with strong purple iridescence and usually with some silvery scales overlapping fringe; terminal and tornal fringe dark brown with some gloden gloss; underside of forewing fuscous, without spots or androconia. Hindwing grey with some golden gloss and purple iridescence on upper side, dark grey on underside, without androconia; fringe grey. Legs silvery cream to grey, laterally fuscous. Abdomen fuscous with purple iridescence on upper side, silvery cream to grey cream on underside; anal tufts fuscous, very short, indistinctive; genital plates cream.

Female ( Figs 18, 20 View FIGURES 13 – 22 ). Similar to male. Number of segments of flagellum remains unknown (antennae are broken in the female paratypes).

Male genitalia ( Figs 46–53 View FIGURES 46 – 53 ). Capsule distinctly longer (280 µm) than wide (135 µm). Vinculum very long, with long lateral lobes. Uncus strongly thickened, with three small notches caudally ( Fig. 48 View FIGURES 46 – 53 ). Gnathos with two caudal processes slightly widening basally ( Fig. 48 View FIGURES 46 – 53 ) and rather large central plate. Valva ( Figs 47, 49, 50 View FIGURES 46 – 53 ) 120–130 µm long, 55–70 µm wide, with two large apical processes and one protruding dorsal lobe ( Fig. 47 View FIGURES 46 – 53 ); transtilla with triangularly shaped, lobe-like sublateral processes ( Fig. 46 View FIGURES 46 – 53 ). Juxta absent or fully membranous (not visible in the permanent mounts of the type series). Chitinized tube of phallus ( Figs 51–53 View FIGURES 46 – 53 ) 160–190 µm long, 70 µm wide, with three spine-like carinae ( Figs 51, 52 View FIGURES 46 – 53 ); vesica with 9–10 large spine-like cornuti including a curved one ( Fig. 53 View FIGURES 46 – 53 ), and with a distal cluster of 11 weaker chitinized spine-like cornuti ( Fig. 51 View FIGURES 46 – 53 ); there are also numerous minute spinelike cornuti on vesica ( Fig. 51 View FIGURES 46 – 53 ).

Female genitalia ( Figs 54–57 View FIGURES 54 – 57 ). Total length about 835 µm. Anterior and posterior apophyses similar in the lenght; anterior apophyses distictly wide, posterior ones very slender. Vestibulum without sclerites. Corpus bursae with large folded distal part and 250 µm wide, oval shaped basal part with numerous comb-like pectinations ( Fig. 57 View FIGURES 54 – 57 ). Accessory sac very large; ductus spermathecae without coils ( Fig. 55 View FIGURES 54 – 57 ). Abdominal apex slender, narrowing distally ( Figs 54, 56 View FIGURES 54 – 57 ).

Bionomics ( Figs 41–45 View FIGURES 40 – 45 ). Host plant: Salvia scutellarioides Kunth   , Lamiaceae   ( Figs 42, 43 View FIGURES 40 – 45 ). Egg on upper side or underside of the leaf. Larva pale to bright yellow, with pale ochre-brown intestine and grey-brown head; feeds in January and February (possibly also in late December; in February half of leaf-mines are empty, only some with very young larvae). Leaf mine is a very slender and long sinuous gallery; at the beginning, filled with black frass ( Fig. 45 View FIGURES 40 – 45 ); further on, the gallery gradually widens, with distinctive areas of the track not filled with the frass ( Fig. 45 View FIGURES 40 – 45 ). Larval exit slit on upper side of the leaf. Cocoon ( Figs 21, 22 View FIGURES 13 – 22 ) beige, 2.4–2.5 mm long, 1.4–1.5 mm wide. Adults probably fly in March –April (indoors, emerged in March).

Distribution ( Fig. 40 View FIGURES 40 – 45 ). This species occurs in the Andes (southern Ecuador: Loja Province), usually on semidry slopes at altitude about 1800 m ( Fig. 41 View FIGURES 40 – 45 ).

Etymology. The species is named after the host-plant genus Scutellaria   L.

ZMUC

Zoological Museum, University of Copenhagen