Capanema capara Mendes & Rafael

Mendes, Diego Matheus De Mello & Rafael, José Albertino, 2021, Two new and rare genera of angle-winged katydids (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae Phaneropterinae: Microcentrini) from the Brazilian Amazon Rainforest, Zootaxa 4999 (6), pp. 553-572: 555-559

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4999.6.3

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:35374ADF-6423-4A3F-91DF-BAD8E30C7868

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5119792

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/6958878F-E179-F566-FF7C-58BCFEC0FE41

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Capanema capara Mendes & Rafael
status

sp. nov.

Capanema capara Mendes & Rafael   sp. nov.

Figures 2–5 View FIGURE 2 View FIGURE 3 View FIGURE 4 View FIGURE 5 and 10 View FIGURE 10

Diagnosis. Tegmina with distal region upward, forming an angle of 130° ( Fig. 4 View FIGURE 4 ). Fourth branch of vein CuA and vein MP not connected by transverse vein ( Fig. 4 View FIGURE 4 ). First three branches of vein CuA associated with hyaline regions with dark bands lined up ( Fig. 4 View FIGURE 4 ). Apex of cercus with square expansion and small spiny ( Fig. 3K View FIGURE 3 ). Lateral lobes of mesobasisternum forming an acute posterolateral angle of 40° slightly curved outward ( Fig. 3E View FIGURE 3 ).

Description. Holotype Male.

Thorax. Lateral lobes of mesobasisternum anterolaterally, laterally and posteriorly straight, forming an acute posterolateral angle of 40° slightly curved outwards ( Fig. 3E View FIGURE 3 ). Metabasisternum triangular, anteriorly straight ( Fig. 3E View FIGURE 3 ).

Wings. Tegmina broad, posterior margin somewhat convex, distal region upward, forming an angle of 130° ( Fig. 4 View FIGURE 4 ). MA with four branches ( Fig. 4 View FIGURE 4 ). Vein CuA connected with vein MP ( Fig. 4 View FIGURE 4 ). Fourth branch of vein CuA, vein MP and first branch of vein MA with asymmetrical dark spots ( Fig. 4 View FIGURE 4 ). First three branches of vein CuA associated with hyaline regions with dark bands lined up ( Fig. 4 View FIGURE 4 ).

Total length of left stridulatory file 2 mm, greater vein width of 0.4 mm and a total of 49 teeth ( Fig. 5A View FIGURE 5 ). Right stridulatory file straight, with basal and apex region concave ( Fig. 5B View FIGURE 5 ). Total length file of 1.8 mm, widest vein of 0.2 mm and total of 51 teeth. Teeth rectangular, narrow and far apart; teeth basal and apical minor ( Figs. 5B View FIGURE 5 ).

Abdomen. Apex of cercus with square expansion and small spiny, both with dark brown coloration ( Fig. 3K View FIGURE 3 ).

Internal male genitalia. Not examined.

Coloration. Based on photos of preserved specimen ( Fig. 3 View FIGURE 3 ). Body yellowish-brown. Eyes dark brown.

Female: unknown.

Etymology. The epithet is in apposition, capara   [kapara] comes from the Brazilian indigenous language Tupi and means “crooked leaf”, in reference to the shape of tegmina this species, similar to crooked leaf.

Geographical records. Brazil: Amazonas ( Fig. 10 View FIGURE 10 ).

Type material. Holotype ♂. BRASIL, Amazonas, Manaus , ZF-2, km 14, 02°35’21”S – 60°06’55”W, 24.x– 10.xi.2017, Malaise grande, 8 m de altura, lado poente, J.A. Rafael leg. ( INPA). GoogleMaps  

Measurements (mm). Holotype ♂: TL: 23; TegL: 26; TegH: 15,3; WF: 3,5; PL: 6; PH: 5,4; FF: 4,5; FT: 5,5; MF: 7,1; MT: 9,3; HF: 16; HT: 17,5; Lplac: 2,9; LC: 2.

Natural history notes. The specimen was collected in the Biological Reserve of Cuieras, in an Terra Firma forest, at a 40 m high scientific tower. This tower is designed to allow access to the forest canopy and has been widely used for insect collection for several years. In 2014, nightly collections with light traps were carried out monthly, method that the most effective for collecting Phaneropterinae   . In 2017, malaise traps were set up at different heights in the tower and they remained active for one year. However, even with all this collection effort employed in the area, a single specimen from a malaise installed in the tower at 8 m from the ground was collected. Capanema capara   sp. nov. is probably an exclusive resident of the forest canopy and his rarity may suggest that the natural density is very low (possibly temporal or spatial) or that the collection methods used until today are not effective for their capture.

INPA

Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia