Isoperla evanescens Verdone & KondratieffIsoperla irregularis

Verdone, Chris J. & Kondratieff, Boris, 2016, A New Species Of Isoperla Banks (Plecoptera: Perlodidae) From The Appalachian Mountains, Virginia & West Virginia, U. S. A., Illiesia 12 (13), pp. 74-85: 76-85

publication ID

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4752829

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:A6309A28-4E61-43B3-9645-340544C0C41E

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4758703

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/4959296F-FF95-FF8A-FCFD-F94A7847FAFC

treatment provided by

Felipe

scientific name

Isoperla evanescens Verdone & Kondratieff Isoperla irregularis
status

sp. n.

Isoperla evanescens Verdone & Kondratieff   , sp. n.

Vanishing Stripetail

( Figs. 1-19 View Fig View Figs View Figs View Fig View Fig View Figs View Fig View Figs )

http://lsid.speciesfile.org/urn:lsid: Plecoptera   .speciesfile.org: TaxonName:494849

Material Examined. USA - Holotype ♂, Virginia: Bland Co., Wolf Creek, Grapefield Rd., Co. Rd. 614, Stephen Levitt Property , N 37.14702, W 81.26314, 8 June 2016, C. Verdone, B. Kondratieff ( USNM). GoogleMaps   Paratypes: same data as holotype, ♀ ( USNM); GoogleMaps   same data as holotype, 4♂, 5♀ ( CSUC); GoogleMaps   same location, 4 June 2016, C. Verdone, B. Kondratieff, 5♀ ( CSUC); GoogleMaps   same location, 6 June 2016, C. Verdone, B. Kondratieff, ♂, 2♀ ( CSUC); GoogleMaps   Wolf Creek, Grapefield Rd. , Co. Rd. 614, USFS Wolf Creek Picnic Area , N 37.18026, W 81.19496, 8 June 2016, C. Verdone, B. Kondratieff, 2♂, 1♀ ( CSUC); GoogleMaps   same location, 12 June 2016, C. Verdone, B. Kondratieff, ♂, 2♀ ( CSUC); GoogleMaps   Craig Co., Potts Creek, Hwy 18, Steel Bridge Campground , N 37.59800, W 80.22704, 10 June 2016, C. Verdone, B. Kondratieff, ♂, ♀ ( CSUC); GoogleMaps   Giles Co., Sinking Creek, Hwy 42, Newport Community Park , N 37.30289, W 80.48522, 10 June 2016, C. Verdone, B. Kondratieff, ♀ ( CSUC). GoogleMaps   Additional Material: Virginia: Giles Co., Sinking Creek , Rt. 42, Newport Park , N 37.30289, W 80.48522, 21 May 1979, J. Marshall, 2♀ ( CSUC); GoogleMaps   Grayson Co., New River, Rt. 94 bridge, 3 mi. W of Galax, N 36.64633, W 80.97790, 18 May 1994, B. Kondratieff, F. Kirchner, 2♂, 6♀ ( CSUC); GoogleMaps   Montgomery Co., Mill Creek, Rt. 785 GoogleMaps   , N 37.26135, W 80.34054, 1 June 1978, B. Kondratieff, ♀ ( CSUC); GoogleMaps   same location, 15 April 1980, (emerged 27 April 1980), B. Kondratieff, ♂ ( CSUC); GoogleMaps   Tom’ s Creek, Rt. 655, N 37.238054, W 80.47339, 11 April 1978, (emerged 11 May 1978), B. Kondratieff, 4♀ ( CSUC); GoogleMaps   same location, 2 May 1978, (emerged 8 May 1978), B. Kondratieff, ♀ ( CSUC); GoogleMaps   same location, 2 May 1978, (emerged 12 May 1978), B. Kondratieff, 2♀ ( CSUC); GoogleMaps   same location, 11 May 1978, B. Kondratieff, ♀ ( CSUC); GoogleMaps   same location, 28 May 1978, B. Kondratieff, ♂ ( CSUC); GoogleMaps   same location, 17 May 1979, C. Parker, ♀ ( CSUC); GoogleMaps   same location, 17 May 1979, Wills, ♀ ( CSUC); GoogleMaps   same location, 7 May 1981, B. Kondratieff, 2N ( CSUC); GoogleMaps   same location, 18 May 1979, B. Kondratieff, ♂ ( CSUC); GoogleMaps   Smyth Co., North Fork Holston River , Rt. 620 GoogleMaps   , N 36.94099, W 81.44901, 8 May 1982, B. Kondratieff, 7♂, 3♀ ( CSUC); GoogleMaps   same location, 1 May 1983, B. Kondratieff, 3♂, 2♀, 2N ( CSUC); GoogleMaps   same location, 11 May 1986, B. Kondratieff, 2♂, 1♀ ( CSUC); GoogleMaps   Saltville , N 36.88150, W 81.76206, 27 May 1980, R. H. Zimmerman, ♀ ( CSUC); GoogleMaps   Russell Co., Carr Creek, Co. Rd. 613, Jct. US 58, Bolton , N 36.80438, W 82.19706, 21 May 1993, B. Kondratieff, F. Kirchner, ♂ ( CSUC); GoogleMaps   Tazewell Co., Little River, at Claypool Hill , N 37.03647, W 81.79749, 21 May 1993, B. Kondratieff, F. Kirchner, ♀ ( CSUC); GoogleMaps   West Virginia: Summer Co., Indian Creek, Rt. 33, N 37.53020, W 80.80283, 10 May 1982, Burkhardt, 3♂, 7♀ ( CSUC) GoogleMaps   .

Distribution. USA – VA, WV ( Fig. 21 View Fig )

Etymology. The name evanescens   is derived from the Latin root word evani meaning “disappearing” or “vanishing” and the Latin adjectival suffix escens meaning “becoming,” or “beginning to” and refers to the seemingly vanishing pigmentation on the proximal portions of the wing veins, head and pronotum of the adult.

Male. Macropterous; forewing length 9.0 - 10.0 mm (N=5). Body length 7.5 - 8.0 mm (N=5). Head and pronotum pale yellow. General body color pale yellow to light brown with light brown markings dorsally ( Fig. 1 View Fig ). Dorsum of head unmarked except for dark pigmented ocelli ( Fig. 2 View Figs ). Antennal scape pale yellow; flagellum progressively darkened toward apex. Pronotum unmarked; rugosities irregular, raised, pale yellow ( Fig. 2 View Figs ). Femora pale yellow on proximal half, light brown on distal half, darkest on dorsal edge, covered with uniformly spaced, short, brown setae ( Fig. 2 View Figs ). Tibia yellow to light brown, darkest on proximal dorsal edge, covered with uniformly spaced short, brown setae. Tarsi medium brown. Meso- and metanota mostly pale yellow, light brown on posterior margins. Wings pale; veins pale on proximal half, light brown on distal half. Terga pale yellow, posterior ⅓ light brown, darkest medially, sometimes forming a stripe; terga 1-8 with uniformly spaced brown setae. Posterior ⅓ of tergum 9 with moderately developed patch of sensilla basiconica ( Fig. 3 View Figs ). Tergum 10 with a medial, posteriorly directed, pale, spade-shaped marking. Paraprocts short, broadly triangular, slightly incurved ( Figs. 3 View Figs , 7 View Figs ), scattered setae and sensilla basiconica scattered over dorsal surface, absent on apex; moderately sclerotized on outer margin; tips bluntly pointed and recurved ( Figs. 3 View Figs , 7 View Figs , 9 View Fig ). Cerci pale yellow; terminal segments light brown; cercal segments with a single, long, stout, ventral hair at posterior margins. Sterna pale yellow; sternum 8 with a light brown recessed vesicle, 1.4X as long as wide; evenly rounded and expanded posteriorly, extending to the posterior margin of sternum 8 ( Fig. 4 View Figs ). Aedeagus with a stout basal stalk, and ridge of short posteromedial spines. Basal stalk completely encircled by dense golden setae ( Figs. 5-7 View Figs ); posteromedial area with a small, thin sclerite bearing ca. 10 short spines that are acutely rounded apically; posterior half of sclerite bearing stout setae ( Figs. 7-8 View Figs ); area posterodorsal to basal band with small spinulae; areas posterodorsal and anterodorsal to spine bearing sclerite surrounded by scallop-shaped spine plates ( Fig. 8 View Figs ).

Female. Macropterous; forewing wing length 9.5 - 10.5 mm (N=5). Body length 8.6 - 9.2 mm (N=5). Body coloration and morphology similar to male. Sternum 8 with a light brown, broadly triangular, subgenital plate extending approximately ⅔ over sternum 9 ( Fig. 10 View Fig ). Sternum 10 with a pair of light brown spots on the posterolateral margins.

Ovum. General shape oblong ( Fig. 11 View Figs ); cross section concave ( Fig. 12 View Figs ); collar absent; eclosion line absent ( Figs. 11, 12 View Figs ). Color light brown. Length 312 - 333 μm, width 248 - 250 μm (N=2). Chorion covered with reticulate, raised, thickened ridges, some not connected; fine punctations present between reticulations ( Fig. 13 View Figs ). Micropyles positioned singularly on top of ridges near anterior third of egg body; openings usually expanded, doughnut shaped ( Fig. 14 View Figs ).

Male nymph. Body length 6.9 - 7.5 mm, (N=2). Preserved specimen yellow brown with brown markings ( Fig. 15 View Fig ). Dorsum of head with a contrasting pigment pattern ( Fig. 16 View Figs ); anterior of frontoclypeus unpigmented; anterolateral dark spots near frontoclypeal pale area ( Fig. 16 View Figs ); small enclosed pale spot anterior to median ocellus; small, pale, oval interocellar spot anterior to epicranial suture, narrowly open along epicranial Y-stem; interrupting pale spots present on distal edge of lateral ocelli, open along epicranial suture ( Fig. 16 View Figs ). Pronotum with dark irregular ring on either side of wide median pale area; a single pale spot within each ring; lateral margins of pronotum pale ( Fig. 15 View Fig ). Abdomen with three longitudinal stripes, two wider lateral, one narrow median, each segment with eight dark spots in an anterior transverse row ( Fig. 17 View Figs ). Lacinia unidentate ( Fig. 18 View Figs ); lacinia tapering evenly from apical tooth and bearing stout marginal setae to near base; medial submarginal setae arranged in a close set row below apical tooth ( Fig. 18A View Figs ), no setae on outer surface of apical tooth as in other species  of the group; submarginal setae continuous to near base; gaps between setae increase towards base; apical tooth approximately ⅕ as long as palm length. Mandible with 6 teeth and a deep cleft between apical and subapical teeth; most noticeable on dorsum ( Fig. 19 View Figs ); dorsal apical tooth flattened, broadly rounded; interior edge serrated, ventral apical tooth acutely rounded ( Fig. 19A View Figs ).

Diagnosis. Isoperla evanescens   is placed in the I. irregularis   group and is the only member of the group currently known to occur east of the Appalachian Plateau Physiographic Province (Woodward & Hoffmann 1991). Isoperla evanescens   is superficially similar to I. decepta   in general habitus, which also lacks all dark markings on the head, (fig. 12.1, Szczytko & Kondratieff 2015). However, males of the two species  are separable by the shape of the paraprocts, vesicle, details of the aedeagus, and pronotal rugosity pigmentation. The paraprocts of I. evanescens   are broadly triangular and extend only slightly over the posterior margin of tergum 10 ( Figs. 3 View Figs , 7 View Figs ); the vesicle is expanded posteriorly ( Fig. 4 View Figs ); the posteromedial sclerotized structure of the aedeagus is composed of a thin sclerite bearing setae and ca. 10 short spines ( Fig. 8 View Figs ); additionally, I. evanescens   lacks dark pigmentation on the pronotum ( Fig. 2 View Figs ). Whereas, in males of I. decepta   , the paraprocts are elongate and extend ¼ to ½ over tergum 10 (fig. 12.3, Szczytko & Kondratieff 2015); the vesicle is not expanded posteriorly (fig. 12.2, Szczytko & Kondratieff 2015); the posteromedial sclerite of the aedeagus is a lobed structure that is deflected ventrally and is scattered with concentrations of stout sharp spinulae (figs. 12.6, 12.10, 2.11, Szczytko & Kondratieff 2015). Additionally, I. decepta   has medium to pale brown rugosities on the pronotum (fig. 12.1, Szczytko & Kondratieff 2015).

Females of I. evanescens   can be separated by the unique combination of a pale yellow head in life, whitish in ethanol preserved specimens, pronotum without dark markings, and a broadly triangular subgenital plate ( Fig. 10 View Fig ). Whereas, females of I. decepta   have medium to pale brown rugosities on the pronotum and the subgenital plate is broadly rounded (fig. 12.4, Szczytko & Kondratieff 2015). Ova of the two species  can be separated on the basis of cross sectional shape and the presence of reticulate ridges. The ovum of I. evanescens   has a concave cross section and possesses reticulate, raised, thickened ridges ( Figs. 11-14 View Figs ). Whereas, the ovum of I. decepta   is circular in cross section and lacks reticulate ridges (figs. 12.18, 12.19 Szczytko & Kondratieff 2015). The ovum of I. evanescens   is most similar to I. nana (Walsh, 1862)   , but can be separated by the presence of inter-reticulate punctations ( Fig. 13 View Figs ), which I. nana   lacks (figs. 35.13-35.15, Szczytko & Kondratieff 2015).

Several specimens of I. evanescens   that are deposited in the C.P. Gillette Museum of Arthropod Diversity had previously been identified as I. dicala Frison, 1942   , which is regionally common and is often sympatric with I. evanescens   . Recently collected material of I. evanescens   with everted aedeagus has allowed the separation of these two species  , which can be confused by the lack of usually dark dorsal head pigmentation. Males of these species  without the aedeagus everted can also be separated by the differences in pronotal pigmentation and details of the vesicle. Isoperla dicala   has dark pronotal pigmentation and a vesicle that is 3X as long as wide (figs. 14.1, 14.2, Szczytko & Kondratieff 2015). Whereas, I. evanescens   lacks pronotal pigmentation and the vesicle is 1.4X as long as wide. Females can be separated by the differences in the pronotal pigmentation and details of the subgenital plate. The subgenital plate of I. dicala   usually possesses a medial nipple (fig. 14.5, Szczytko & Kondratieff 2015), whereas I. evanescence   lacks it. Eggs of the two species  are not similar and can be easily separated by the presence or absence of a collar;

I. dicala   possesses a collar (fig. 14.13, Szczytko & Kondratieff 2015), whereas I. evanescens   lacks one.

The following couplets to the keys to males, females, and ova are taken directly from Szczytko & Kondratieff (2015). New couplets are given to include the new species   .

Males

11 Dorsal head pattern pale, usually without dark brown bands or brown markings connecting ocelli ( Figs. 14.1, 12.1 View Figs ) …………………….…… 12

11’Dorsal head pattern with dark brown bands connecting ocelli ( Figs. 17.1 View Figs , 20.1 View Fig 20 , 33.1) ……... 13

12 Vesicle 3X as long as wide, set in a deep U-shaped depression ¾ as long as length of vesicle ( Fig. 14.2 View Figs ); paraprocts lightly sclerotized, bluntly pointed apically, not deflected ventraapically ( Fig. 14.4 View Figs ), aedeagus with erect posteromesal sclerotized unicorn-shaped rod ( Figs. 14.6, 14.7 View Figs ); head pattern occasionally with thin dark brown bands connecting ocelli distribution–widespread–eastern and midwestern North America ……………………………. I. dicala  

12’Not as above …………………………………... 12a

12a Posteromedial sclerotized structure of the aedeagus composed of a thin sclerite bearing 10 short spines and setae ( Figs. 6-8 View Figs ); paraprocts broadly triangular extending only slightly over the posterior margin of tergum 10 ( Figs. 3 View Figs , 7, 8 View Figs ) ………………………………………... I. evanescens  

12a’ Posteromedial sclerotized structure lobe-like, deflected ventrally with scattered concentrations of stout sharp spinulae (figs. 12.6, 12.10, 2.11, Szczytko & Kondratieff 2015); paraprocts lightly sclerotized, elongate, sharply pointed apically, extending over ca. ¼-½ length of tergum 10 (figs. 12.3,12.5, Szczytko & Kondratieff 2015) …………………...….. I. decepta  

Females

1 Head without a dark pigment pattern, usually without dark brown bands or brown markings connecting ocelli ( Figs. 12.1, 14.1 View Figs ) …………….. 2

1’ Dorsal head pattern with discernible dark brown bands connecting ocelli (Figs. 42.1, 6.1)... 3

2 Subgenital plate broadly triangular, extending ½ length of 9 th sternum; usually with posteromedian nipple ( Fig. 14.5 View Figs ); distribution– widespread, eastern North America through midwestern US ……………………..……. I. dicala  

2’ Subgenital plate evenly rounded to broadly triangular extending over ⅓ or ⅔ length of 9 th sternum (fig. 12.4, Szczytko & Kondratieff 2015; Fig. 9 View Fig ) …………………………………………… 2a

2a Subgenital plate evenly rounded extending over ⅓ length of 9 th sternum (fig. 12.4, Szczytko & Kondratieff 2015) ………………………. I. decepta

2a’ Subgenital plate broadly triangular, extending over ⅔ length of 9 th sternum ( Fig. 9 View Fig ) ………………………………………... I. evanescens  

Eggs

1 Collar absent ( Figs. 12.18 View Figs , 22.13, 35.13) ……….. 2

1’ Collar present (Figs. 28.14, 36.9, 41.13, 58.15) …6

2 Chorion covered with raised reticulate thickened ridges, some not connected, eclosion line absent, inter-reticulate punctations absent (figs. 35.13, 35.14 Szczytko & Kondratieff 2015)...... I. nana  

2’ Not as above …………………………………… 2a

2a Inter-reticulate punctations present ( Fig. 14 View Figs ) ………………………………………... I. evanescens  

2a’Chorion without raised reticulate thickened ridges, eclosion line present or absent (figs. 12.18, 22.13, 22.14 Szczytko & Kondratieff 2015) …………………………………………………….. 3

3 Cross section triangular, eclosion line wide, smooth (Figs. 22.13, 22.15) …...……. I. irregularis  

3’ Cross section not triangular, either round or concave, eclosion line absent ( Figs. 12.18 View Figs , 23.21, 57.15) ……………………………………………... 4

Biological Notes. There is no information about the biology or life cycle of I. evanescens   . Based on the above records, the emergence period appears to be from early May to mid-June and, as with most eastern Isoperla   , a univoltine life cycle is presumed. The type locality, Wolf Creek ( Fig. 20 View Fig 20 ), has a diverse stonefly fauna. Other adult stoneflies collected with the new species  at the type locality were Acroneuria abnormis (Newman, 1838)   , A. kosztarabi Kondratieff & Kirchner, 1993   , Agnetina capitata (Pictet, 1841)   , A. flavescens (Walsh, 1862)   , Amphinemura delosa (Ricker, 1952)   , A. nigritta (Provancher, 1876)   , A. wui (Claassen, 1936)   , Diploperla morgani Kondratieff & Voshell, 1979   , I. dicala Frison, 1942   , I. montana (Banks, 1898)   , I. signata (Banks, 1902)   , Leuctra alexanderi Hanson, 1941   , L. duplicata Claassen, 1923   , Neoperla occipitalis (Pictet, 1841)   , Paragnetina media (Walker, 1852)   , Perlesta decipiens (Walsh, 1862)   , P. puttmanni Kondratieff & Kirchner, 2003   , and P. teaysia Kirchner and Kondratieff, 1997   .

The following couplets to the keys to males, females, and ova are taken directly from Szczytko & Kondratieff (2015). New couplets are given to include the new species   .

Males

11 Dorsal head pattern pale, usually without dark brown bands or brown markings connecting ocelli ( Figs. 14.1, 12.1 View Figs ) …………………….…… 12

11’Dorsal head pattern with dark brown bands connecting ocelli ( Figs. 17.1 View Figs , 20.1 View Fig 20 , 33.1) ……... 13

12 Vesicle 3X as long as wide, set in a deep U-shaped depression ¾ as long as length of vesicle ( Fig. 14.2 View Figs ); paraprocts lightly sclerotized, bluntly pointed apically, not deflected ventraapically ( Fig. 14.4 View Figs ), aedeagus with erect posteromesal sclerotized unicorn-shaped rod ( Figs. 14.6, 14.7 View Figs ); head pattern occasionally with thin dark brown bands connecting ocelli distribution–widespread–eastern and midwestern North America ……………………………. I. dicala  

12’Not as above …………………………………... 12a

12a Posteromedial sclerotized structure of the aedeagus composed of a thin sclerite bearing 10 short spines and setae ( Figs. 6-8 View Figs ); paraprocts broadly triangular extending only slightly over the posterior margin of tergum 10 ( Figs. 3 View Figs , 7, 8 View Figs ) ………………………………………... I. evanescens  

12a’ Posteromedial sclerotized structure lobe-like, deflected ventrally with scattered concentrations of stout sharp spinulae (figs. 12.6, 12.10, 2.11, Szczytko & Kondratieff 2015); paraprocts lightly sclerotized, elongate, sharply pointed apically, extending over ca. ¼-½ length of tergum 10 (figs. 12.3,12.5, Szczytko & Kondratieff 2015) …………………...….. I. decepta  

Females

1 Head without a dark pigment pattern, usually without dark brown bands or brown markings connecting ocelli ( Figs. 12.1, 14.1 View Figs ) …………….. 2

1’ Dorsal head pattern with discernible dark brown bands connecting ocelli (Figs. 42.1, 6.1)... 3

2 Subgenital plate broadly triangular, extending ½ length of 9 th sternum; usually with posteromedian nipple ( Fig. 14.5 View Figs ); distribution– widespread, eastern North America through midwestern US ……………………..……. I. dicala  

2’ Subgenital plate evenly rounded to broadly triangular extending over ⅓ or ⅔ length of 9 th sternum (fig. 12.4, Szczytko & Kondratieff 2015; Fig. 9 View Fig ) …………………………………………… 2a

2a Subgenital plate evenly rounded extending over ⅓ length of 9 th sternum (fig. 12.4, Szczytko & Kondratieff 2015) ………………………. I. decepta

2a’ Subgenital plate broadly triangular, extending over ⅔ length of 9 th sternum ( Fig. 9 View Fig ) ………………………………………... I. evanescens  

Eggs

1 Collar absent ( Figs. 12.18 View Figs , 22.13, 35.13) ……….. 2

1’ Collar present (Figs. 28.14, 36.9, 41.13, 58.15) …6

2 Chorion covered with raised reticulate thickened ridges, some not connected, eclosion line absent, inter-reticulate punctations absent (figs. 35.13, 35.14 Szczytko & Kondratieff 2015)...... I. nana  

2’ Not as above …………………………………… 2a

2a Inter-reticulate punctations present ( Fig. 14 View Figs ) ………………………………………... I. evanescens  

2a’Chorion without raised reticulate thickened ridges, eclosion line present or absent (figs. 12.18, 22.13, 22.14 Szczytko & Kondratieff 2015) …………………………………………………….. 3

3 Cross section triangular, eclosion line wide, smooth (Figs. 22.13, 22.15) …...……. I. irregularis  

3’ Cross section not triangular, either round or concave, eclosion line absent ( Figs. 12.18 View Figs , 23.21, 57.15) ……………………………………………... 4

Biological Notes. There is no information about the biology or life cycle of I. evanescens   . Based on the above records, the emergence period appears to be from early May to mid-June and, as with most eastern Isoperla   , a univoltine life cycle is presumed. The type locality, Wolf Creek ( Fig. 20 View Fig 20 ), has a diverse stonefly fauna. Other adult stoneflies collected with the new species  at the type locality were Acroneuria abnormis (Newman, 1838)   , A. kosztarabi Kondratieff & Kirchner, 1993   , Agnetina capitata (Pictet, 1841)   , A. flavescens (Walsh, 1862)   , Amphinemura delosa (Ricker, 1952)   , A. nigritta (Provancher, 1876)   , A. wui (Claassen, 1936)   , Diploperla morgani Kondratieff & Voshell, 1979   , I. dicala Frison, 1942   , I. montana (Banks, 1898)   , I. signata (Banks, 1902)   , Leuctra alexanderi Hanson, 1941   , L. duplicata Claassen, 1923   , Neoperla occipitalis (Pictet, 1841)   , Paragnetina media (Walker, 1852)   , Perlesta decipiens (Walsh, 1862)   , P. puttmanni Kondratieff & Kirchner, 2003   , and P. teaysia Kirchner and Kondratieff, 1997   .

USNM

Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History

CSUC

California State University, Chico, Vertebrate Museum

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Insecta

Order

Plecoptera

Family

Perlodidae

Genus

Isoperla

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Insecta

Order

Plecoptera

Family

Perlodidae

Genus

Isoperla