Cephennium mariposae Hopp & Caterino

Hopp, Katie & Caterino, Michael, 2009, Seven new species of Cephennium Müller & Kunze (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Scydmaeninae, Cephenniini) from California with a key to native North American species, ZooKeys 24 (24), pp. 31-54: 41-44

publication ID

http://doi.org/ 10.3897/zookeys.24.247

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:BB883B1E-E58F-4074-92EB-7E814E78F678

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3790610

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/4157F97A-FF97-FFF7-FF7E-FC3EFECA16FF

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Cephennium mariposae Hopp & Caterino
status

sp. n.

Cephennium mariposae Hopp & Caterino   , sp. n.

urn:lsid:zoobank.org:act:2E36C8F3-E54C-4CD3-AAF4-A5D366014F5E

Figs 1C, 2C, 3C, 4C, 6

Type Material. Holotype (sex not determined): “CALIF: Mariposa Co.; Mariposa [̴ 37.4766°N, 119.9584°W] XI-15-1984; Berlese rotten log; A. J. Gilbert ” ( CSCA). GoogleMaps  

Etymology. This species is named for the county and town from which it was collected, Mariposa.

Diagnosis. This species can be distinguished from its California congeners by the character combination of the presence of four ommatidia on each side of the head ( Fig. 4C View Figure 4 ), the mesosternal process truncate at the apex ( Fig. 2C View Figure 2 ), and the humeral angle of the elytron weakly raised and dorsally flattened ( Fig. 3C View Figure 3 ). Cephennium mariposae   is most similar to C. celsifrons   but can be distinguished from it by the latter having only two ommatidia on each side of the head ( Fig. 2A View Figure 2 ) and a more elongate and slender body form (Fig. 1B). Th is species can be easily separated from C. urbanum   , C. anopthalmicum   , C. canestroi   , C. grandarboreum   and C. gilberti   by the absence of ommatidia and the apex of the mesosternal keel being divergent in these species. It can be further distinguished from C. anophthalmicum   , C. urbanum   and C. aridum   by the humeral angle of the elytron projecting laterally to a point in these three species ( Fig. 3A View Figure 3 , G-H).

Description. Length: 0.836 mm; pronotal width: 0.380 mm; elytral width: 0.437 mm. Body broad, ovate, slightly convex, testaceous, evenly densely pubescent, pubescence golden, slender, moderate in length (Fig. 1C). Head small, deflexed, sparsely pubescent, not narrowing anteriorly from antennal insertions; frons flat; four ommatidia present on each side of head. Antenna setose, antennomere I and II longer than broad, antennomeres III-VI quadrate and smaller than antennomeres II and VII, antennomere VIII smaller than antennomeres VII and IX, antennomeres IX-XI gradually clavate forming a loose club. Pronotum densely pubescent, broadest between middle and anterior third, disc convex medially and weakly flattened near each posterior angle; anterior margin not visible from above; anterior and posterior margin lacking marginal bead; marginal bead complete laterally, gradually widening towards base; lateral edge broadly rounded to posterior third, then evenly to base (Fig. 1C). Hypomeron smooth, sparsely setose towards upper quarter and along outside (lateral) edge; hypomeral bead anterolaterad procoxae sinuate. Prosternum without nodules anterolaterad procoxal cavities ( Fig. 2C View Figure 2 ). Elytra impunctate, as pubescent as pronotum, covering all abdominal segments, weakly truncate at apex; elytral suture flat; elytral striae absent; basomedial fovea present on each elytron, fovea small, with moderately dense inwardly directed setae (Figs. 1C, 3C). Humeral angles of elytron raised, dorsally flattened (plateau-like), apically rounded, slender, moderately curving posterad around anterolateral angles ( Fig. 3C View Figure 3 ). Scutellum roundly triangular, without setae ( Fig. 3C View Figure 3 ). Mesosternal keel setose with indentation around each seta, apex not divergent ( Fig. 2B View Figure 2 ). Metathoracic wings vestigial. Femora strongly clavate in distal half, tibiae expanded and becoming more densely setose towards distal half. Six visible abdominal sternites (fusion between ventrites V and VI). Aedeagus not studied.

Female. Identical to male.

Biology. Th e lone specimen of this species was collected from a rotten log.

Distribution. This species is only known from Mariposa in Mariposa County, CA (Fig. 6).

Cephennium grandarboreum Hopp & Caterino   , sp. n. urn:lsid:zoobank.org:act:8CD00FEF-266D-42A1-8C2F-0031C5EAAF06

Figs 1D, 2D, 3D, 5C, 6

Type Material. Holotype. Male. “CA: Monterey Co.; 36.2403°N, 121.7781°W; LPNF: Sycamore Cyn.; II.14.2006; Caterino&Chatzimanolis; maple/redwood litter”/ “CA BEETLE PROJ; CBP0041534 ” ( SBMN). GoogleMaps  

Paratypes (7): 3 specimens with same data as holotype (1 SBMN, CBP0041525 [disarticulated]; 1 FMNH, CBP0041544; 1 CASC, CBP0041516) GoogleMaps   ; “CA: Monterey Co.; 36.0772°N, 121.5923°W; UC Big Creek Reserve; Redwood Camp, iii.28.2004. M. Caterino, redwood litter” (1 CSCA, CBP0018437; 1 LACM, CBP0018450; 1 SBMN [in freezer for DNA]) GoogleMaps   ; “CA: Monterey Co.; 36.0812°N, 121.5974°W; UC Big

Creek Reserve; BigCk/BrunetteCk.confl.; ii.7.2003, M. Caterino; redwood litter” (1 SBMN, CBP 0006070 [gold coated for SEM]).

Etymology. This species name is the combination of the Latin words grandis and arboreus, meaning very large tree, as this species is associated with coast redwoods ( Sequoia sempervirens   ).

Diagnosis. This species is most similar to Cephennium gilberti   but can be distinguished from it by its body size and shape. Cephennium grandarboreum   is represented by the largest specimens (0.988 –1.121 mm long) of this genus currently known to occur in California, and is very robust. C. gilberti   is known from the smallest specimen (0.646 mm long) of this genus known to occur in California and is much more slender and elongate. These two species can also be separated by the mesosternal keel, which is strongly divergent in C. grandarboreum   , which has the apex ̴2.4× as wide as the widest anterior point ( Fig. 2D View Figure 2 ). The mesosternal keel of C. gilberti   is weakly divergent and ̴2× as wide as the widest anterior point ( Fig. 2F View Figure 2 ). Cephennium grandarboreum   can be separated from all other species by having two scutellar setae ( Fig.3D View Figure 3 ) instead of four ( Fig. 3E View Figure 3 ) or zero ( Figs 3 View Figure 3 A-C, G-H). Apart from the scutellar setae, C. grandarboreum   and C. canestroi   are quite similar, with rounded elytral humeral angles, but the elytral foveae are large and densely setose in C. grandarboreum   (Figs. 1D, 2D), whereas they are smaller and moderately setose in C. canestroi   (Fig. 1E, 2E). Th e humeral angle of the elytron is also more slender and posterorly curved in C. grandarboreum   ( Fig. 3D View Figure 3 ) than in C. canestroi   ( Fig. 3E View Figure 3 ), and has a more strongly divergent mesosternal keel ( Fig. 2D View Figure 2 ) than C. canestroi   ( Fig. 2E View Figure 2 ).

Description. Male. Length: 0.988 –1.121 mm; pronotal width: 0.418 –0.437 mm; elytral width: 0.456 –0.475 mm. Body broad, ovate, slightly convex, rufo-testaceous to amber yellow, evenly densely pubescent, pubescence golden, slender, long (Fig. 1D). Head small, deflexed moderately pubescent, weakly narrowing anteriorly from antennal insertions; eyes absent. Antenna setose, antennomere I and II longer than broad, antennomeres III-VI quadrate and smaller than antennomeres II and VII, antennomere VIII smaller than antennomeres VII and IX, antennomeres IX-XI gradually clavate forming a loose club. Pronotum densely pubescent, broadest between middle and anterior third, disc very convex medially and weakly flattened near each posterior angle; anterior margin not visible from above; anterior and posterior margin lacking marginal bead; marginal bead complete laterally, gradually widening towards base; lateral edge broadly rounded to posterior third, then weakly sinuate at base (Fig. 1D). Hypomeron smooth, sparsely setose towards upper quarter and along outside (lateral) edge, hypomeral bead anterolaterad procoxae with small knob at apex. Prosternum with small, weakly produced egg-shaped nodules anterolaterad procoxal cavities ( Fig. 2D View Figure 2 ). Elytra impunctate, as pubescent as pronotum, covering all abdominal segments, weakly truncate at apex; elytral suture flat; elytral striae absent; basomedial fovea present on each elytron, fovea large, deep, with dense inwardly directed setae (Fig. 1D, 3D). Humeral angle of elytron raised laterad scutellum to humeral angle, humeral plateau slender, dorsally flattened, apically rounded; apex reaching posterad past midline of elytral fovea ( Fig. 3D View Figure 3 ). Scutellum roundly triangular, with two setae ( Fig. 3D View Figure 3 ). Mesosternal keel setose, texture ap- pearing as fish scales anteriorly, abruptly smooth and impunctate near mesometasternal suture, apex strongly bifid and divergent, posterior projections long ( Fig. 2D View Figure 2 ). Metathoracic wings vestigial. Femora strongly clavate in distal half, tibiae expanded and becoming more densely setose towards distal half. Five visible abdominal sternites (sometimes appearing as six due to weak fusion between ventrites V and VI). Aedeagus with median lobe bulbous, heavily sclerotized, median dorsal projection coming to point at apex (triangular), reaching past apical collar; apical collar with dense setae surrounding opening; dorsal parameres slender, longer than median lobe but not extending past apical collar, with lateral subapical setae on each side; apical digiform process extending past apical collar, bent ventrad near apex ( Fig. 5C View Figure 5 ).

Female. Identical to male.

Biology. Specimens were extracted from redwood litter and a combination of maple and redwood litter with the use of Berlese funnels.

Distribution. This species is known from a few localities near Big Sur, Monterey County, CA (Fig. 6).

CSCA

California State Collection of Arthropods

FMNH

Field Museum of Natural History

LACM

Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County