Plectranthias longimanus (Weber)

Gill, Anthony C., Pogonoski, John J., Moore, Glenn I. & Johnson, Jeffrey W., 2021, Review of Australian species of Plectranthias Bleeker and Selenanthias Tanaka (Teleostei: Serranidae: Anthiadinae), with descriptions of four new species, Zootaxa 4918 (1), pp. 1-116: 77-79

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4918.1.1

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:3FEF9EA2-B755-4B22-8B6A-FAFC5C0FFCDF

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4474399

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/335587B2-C41B-1C41-FF28-F81AFEEEFEC4

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Plectranthias longimanus (Weber)
status

 

Plectranthias longimanus (Weber)  

Figures 3A View FIGURE 3 , 5B View FIGURE 5 , 31–32 View FIGURE 31 View FIGURE 32 ; Tables 1–16, 24

Common name: Longfin Perchlet

Pteranthias longimanus Weber 1913: 209   , fig. 54 (type locality: Paternoster Islands , Indonesia).

Plectranthias longimanus   .— Allen & Russell 1986: 85 (checklist, Scott Reef).— Paxton et al. 1989: 507 (checklist).— Allen et al. 2006: 990 (checklist).— Moore et al. 2014: 182 (checklist).— Anderson 2018: 30 View Cited Treatment (checklist).— Parenti & Randall 2020: 26 (checklist). — Moore et al. 2020: appendix 1 (checklist).

Diagnosis. The following combination of characters distinguishes P. longimanus   from all other congeners: dorsal rays X,12–15; fourth dorsal spine longest; pectoral rays 12–13, all rays unbranched; lateral line incomplete, with 10–17 tubed scales; greatest body depth 32.3–39.9 % SL.

Remarks. A small Plectranthias   species (largest known specimen 29 mm SL; Heemstra & Randall 2009), P. longimanus   is known in Australia from the Timor Sea, Great Barrier Reef, Coral Sea and southern Queensland ( Figure 32 View FIGURE 32 ). Elsewhere it ranges widely throughout the Indo-west Pacific, from the east African coast to Tonga ( Heemstra & Randall 2009, Randall et al. 2003).

In their table 1 for western Indian Ocean Plectranthias, Heemstra & Randall (2009)   gave a count of 15 branched caudal-fin rays for this species. In their account for the species, however, they gave a range of 13–15 branched caudal rays. All specimens examined by us had 13 (7+6) branched caudal rays.

We add the following new observations: scales with peripheral cteni; vertebrae 10+16, rarely 10+17; supraneurals 2; predorsal formula 0/0/2/1+1; dorsal pterygiophores in interneural spaces 9–13 1/1/1+1/1+1/1; no trisegmental pterygiophores associated with dorsal fin; terminal dorsal pterygiophore in interneural space 17; no trisegmental pterygiophores associated with anal fin; terminal anal pterygiophore in interhaemal space 5; ribs present on vertebrae 3 through 9–10; epineurals present on vertebrae 1 through 8–10; hypurals 1 and 2 represented by undifferentiated plate, other hypurals and parhypural autogenous ( Figure 5B View FIGURE 5 ); well-developed hypurapophysis on parhypural; epurals 3; single uroneural (posterior uroneural absent); ventral tip of cleithrum with well-developed posteroventral process; proximal tip of first anal-fin pterygiophore near distal tips of parapophyses on vertebra 10.

Morphometric data are summarised in Table 24.

Plectranthias longimanus   is very similar to P. nanus   in coloration and most morphometric and meristic features. They are apparently unique within the genus in having hypurals 1 and 2 present as an undifferentiated plate ( Figure 5B View FIGURE 5 ). This potential synapomorphy has not been found in other examined Plectranthias   species, where instead the two hypurals are autogenous ( Figure 5A View FIGURE 5 ). The two species are distinguished from each other by the following characters: number of pectoral rays (12–13 in P. longimanus   versus 14–15, rarely 13 in P. nanus   ); number of tubed scales in the lateral line (12–17 versus 15–21); number of circumpeduncular scales (12 versus 12–15, usually 14); degree of development of serrations on the interopercle and subopercle (bones with 2–6 and 2–7 conspicuous serrations, respectively, versus each bone with 0–2 weak serrations; Figure 3 View FIGURE 3 ); and body depth (greatest body depth 32.3–39.9 % SL and body depth at anal origin 27.1–32.0 % SL versus 29.4–33.3 % SL and 24.6–27.2 % SL, respectively). The two species also differ slightly in coloration. In particular, P. nanus   is distinguished in having a pale bar on the caudal-fin base, edged posteriorly with a dark bar (or series of short bars). In contrast, P. longimanus   has two dark basal spots on the caudal fin, which are edged dorsally and ventrally by pale spots (cf. Figures 31 View FIGURE 31 and 39 View FIGURE 39 ; see also Kawaji et al. 2019: fig. 4). As noted by Randall (1980), the two species appear to have different habitat requirements: P. longimanus   appears to be found mostly around continental areas or larger islands, whereas P. nanus   is restricted to smaller oceanic islands and reefs. However, the two species overlap in distribution in Australia on the Great Barrier Reef and northern Coral Sea and have been collected from the same rotenone stations (e.g. at Osprey Reef and Boot Reef, Coral Sea).

Material examined. Australia. AMS I.19445-095, 2: 22.1–22.7 mm SL, Queensland, Great Barrier Reef, channel between Yonge and Carter Reefs , 14°35′S, 145°36′E, 15 m GoogleMaps   , AMS team, 8 Nov 1975   ; AMS I.19472-121, 3: 22.6–24.2 mm SL (radiographs only), Queensland, Great Barrier Reef, north end of Yonge Reef, 14°35′S, 145°36′E, 7–15 m GoogleMaps   , AMS team, 23 Nov 1975   ; AMS I.22576-013, 2: 25.7–26.4 mm SL, Queensland, Great Barrier Reef, Escape Reef , middle of back reef edge, 15°50′S, 145°50′E, coral bommie on sand, 34 m GoogleMaps   , AMS team, 27 Oct 1981   ; AMS I.22613-016, 2: 17.0– 24.8 mm SL, AMS I.22613-052, 20.3 mm SL (subsequently cleared and stained), Queensland, Great Barrier Reef, Escape Reef North , back reef floor, 15°49′S, 145°50′E, coral and sand, 27 m GoogleMaps   , AMS team, 1 Nov 1981   ; AMS I.33711-062, 22.3 mm SL, far northern Great Barrier Reef lagoon, 1–2 nautical miles from outer reef, 10°34.48′S, 143°35.28′E, 14–15 m GoogleMaps   , AMS team, 16 Jan 1993   ; AMS I.33715-110, 24.7 mm SL, Coral Sea, Ashmore Reef , southeast corner of lagoon, 10°26.66′S, 144°26.82′E, 12–17 m GoogleMaps   , AMS team et al., 17 Jan 1993   ; NTM S.11373- 034, 25.4 mm SL, Western Australia, Scott Reef, east of Sandy Islet , 14°04′S, 121°47′E, 22–25 m, B.C. Russell, 8 Sep 1984 GoogleMaps   ; NTM S.11387-010, 14.9 mm SL, Western Australia, North Reef , east side, north of passage, 13°15′S, 121°54′E, 7–22 m, B.C. Russell, 12 Sep 1984 GoogleMaps   ; NTM S.13410-001, 18.2 mm SL, Western Australia, Cartier Reef , 12°31.4′S, 123°33.3′E, 12–23 m, J. Short, 7 May 1992 GoogleMaps   ; WAM P.28534-021, 22.8 mm SL, Great Barrier Reef, Ribbon Reefs , 14°58′S, 145°44′E, 25–40 m, G GoogleMaps   . R. Allen , 13 Nov 1985   .

Additional specimens identified for distribution information. AMS I.20937-027, 9.7 mm SL, Queensland , Haggerstone Island, 12°02′E, 143°17′E, 2–5 m   , AMS team, 20 Feb 1979   ; AMS I.25107-071, 5: 13.6–17.0 mm SL, Coral Sea , Osprey Reef, west edge dropoff (13°56′S 146°34′E), 10–25 m GoogleMaps   , AMS team, 6 Nov 1984   ; AMS I.30465- 048, 2: 15.1–22.0 mm SL, Coral Sea , Holmes Reef, lee side, 16°30.5′S, 149°30.0′E, patch reef, 3–10 m GoogleMaps   , AMS Team; AMS I.33728-083, 4: 11.9–18.1 mm SL, Coral Sea , Ashmore Reef, northeast side, 10°09.52′S, 144°35.44′E, outer slope, 4–24 m GoogleMaps   , AMS team, 25 Jan 1993   ; AMS I.33747-053, 2: 10.0–16.0 mm SL, Coral Sea , Boot Reef, 09°58.70′S, 144°42.52′E, coral, sand and rubble, 23–30 m GoogleMaps   , AMS team, 27 Jan 1993   ; AMS I.33751-053, 20.0 mm SL, Coral Sea , Portlock Reef, east side of eastern reef in southern group, 09°35.19′S, 144°48.62′E, steep slope with coral, 5–31 m GoogleMaps   , AMS team, 29 Jan 1993   ; QM I.36357, 25.5 mm SL, Queensland , off Bunker Group, 23°49.5′S, 152°19.5′E, epibenthic sled, 50 m, Seabed Biodiversity Team, 23 May 2004 GoogleMaps   ; QM I.37740, 28.8 mm SL, Queensland , Stradbroke Island , off Point Lookout, Manta Ray Bommie, 27°25′S, 153°33′E, rotenone, 7–11 m, J. Johnson & M. Ekins, 14 Dec 2005 GoogleMaps   .

NTM

Northern Territory Museum of Arts and Sciences

WAM

Western Australian Museum

R

Departamento de Geologia, Universidad de Chile

QM

Queensland Museum

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Chordata

Class

Actinopterygii

Order

Perciformes

Family

Serranidae

Genus

Plectranthias

Loc

Plectranthias longimanus (Weber)

Gill, Anthony C., Pogonoski, John J., Moore, Glenn I. & Johnson, Jeffrey W. 2021
2021
Loc

Plectranthias longimanus

Parenti, P. & Randall, J. E. 2020: 26
Anderson, W. D. Jr 2018: 30
Moore, G. I. & Morrison, S. M. & Hutchins, J. B. & Allen, G. R. & Sampey, A. 2014: 182
Allen, G. R. & Hoese, D. F. & Cross, N. J. & Bray, D. J. 2006: 990
Paxton, J. R. & Hoese, D. F. & Allen, G. R. & Hanley, J. E. 1989: 507
Allen, G. R. & Russell, B. C. 1986: 85
1986
Loc

Pteranthias longimanus

Weber, M. 1913: 209
1913