Bombus lapidarius ( Linnaeus, 1758 )

Williams, Paul H., Altanchimeg, Dorjsuren, Byvaltsev, Alexandr, Jonghe, Roland De, Jaffar, Saleem, Japoshvili, George, Kahono, Sih, Liang, Huan, Mei, Maurizio, Monfared, Alireza, Nidup, Tshering, Raina, Rifat, Ren, Zongxin, Thanoosing, Chawatat, Zhao, Yanhui & Orr, Michael C., 2020, Widespread polytypic species or complexes of local species? Revising bumblebees of the subgenus Melanobombus world-wide (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Bombus), European Journal of Taxonomy 719, pp. 1-120 : 71-74

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.5852/ejt.2020.719.1107

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:A4500016-C219-4353-B81C-5E0BB520547F

persistent identifier

https://treatment.plazi.org/id/252087CA-1F04-9570-FDB8-FEA9DF22FCD4

treatment provided by

Valdenar

scientific name

Bombus lapidarius ( Linnaeus, 1758 )
status

 

Bombus lapidarius ( Linnaeus, 1758)

Figs 14 View Figs 14‒16 , 115–122 View Figs 103–138 , 194 View Figs 190‒198

Apis Lapidaria Linnaeus, 1758: 579 .

Apis Audens Harris, 1776: 130 .

Apis Strenuus Harris, 1776: 131 .

Apis Opis Harris, 1776: 137 .

Apis Pertristis Harris, 1776: 137 .

Apis arbuʃtorum Fabricius, 1776: 246.

Apis coronata Geoffroy in Fourcroy, 1785: 449.

Bremus truncorum Panzer, 1805: 85.

Bremus regelationis Panzer, 1805: 56.

Bombus albicans Schmiedeknecht, 1878: 405.

Bombus lapidarius var. [subsp.] carpatiens Radoszkowski, 1884: 63.

Bombus lapidarius var. [subsp.] decipiens Pérez, 1890: 152.

Bombus luctuosus Ball, 1920: 32 (non Schmiedeknecht, 1878: 388 = B. pratorum (Linnaeus)). Bombus lapidarius st. [subsp.] atlanticus Benoist, 1928: 212.

Bombus flavescens Knechtel, 1963: 712, 714 (non Smith, 1852a: 45 = B. flavescens Smith).

Bombus bisiculus Lecocq, Biella, Martinet & Rasmont, 2019: 7. syn. nov.

Bombus lapidarius var. carpaticus – Friese 1905: 518, incorrect subsequent spelling.

Bombus lapidarium – Berezin, Beiko & Berezina 1996: 118, incorrect subsequent spelling.

Vogt (1909, 1911), Reinig (1935), and Lecocq et al. (2015, 2019) considered the taxon decipiens (thoracic dorsum with yellow bands) to be conspecific with the taxon lapidarius s. str. (thoracic dorsum black) as divergent regional colour patterns within a polytypic species.

Lecocq et al. (2015, 2019) considered B. caucasicus as likely to be a species separate from B. lapidarius from evidence of COI-coalescent analysis and from differences in the composition of male cephalic labial gland secretions (CLGS, believed to be sex pheromones).

Lecocq et al. (2013, 2015, 2019) also discovered divergence in CLGS between B. lapidarius from most of Europe and the yellow-banded bees in samples from southern Italy and they found this difference to coincide with a divergence in COI. They suggested that this (‘ decipiens -like’ taxon) might represent an ‘incipient’ species ( Lecocq et al. 2013) or a ‘recently diverged’ species ( Lecocq et al. 2019). Subsequently they published the name B. bisiculus for this taxon ( Lecocq et al. 2019).

Our PTP analysis ( Fig. 10 View Fig ) of coalescents in the COI gene supports three coalescents for candidate species within the lapidarius- group as identified in the four gene species tree ( Figs 21–22 View Fig View Fig ): a Caucasusregion candidate species, caucasicus, supported strongly, and two more widespread candidate species within the European taxon lapidarius s. lat. (a lapidarius- complex), supported relatively weakly. Our PTP results agree that the taxon decipiens and the taxon lapidarius s. str. are likely to be conspecific as parts of B. lapidarius s. lat. But our PTP results also show that there is a third candidate species ( Fig. 10 View Fig ) that is divergent in COI from B. lapidarius s. str. However, this candidate species does not correspond to (i.e., is not congruent or co-terminous with) Lecocq et al.’s (2015, 2019) south Italian taxon bisiculus (which is included in Figs 9–10). Our candidate species includes not only some of the yellow-banded samples from southern Italy described as the taxon bisiculus by Lecocq et al., but also (from the same data) some unbanded bees from Slovakia, the Czech Republic, Serbia, Bulgaria, and Hungary (Figs 9–10) that Lecocq et al. identify as the taxon lapidarius s. str. At present, our south-eastern candidate species is not supported as a separate species by integrative analysis because (1) not only is it much more broadly distributed than Lecocq et al.’s divergent south-Italian CGLS taxon bisiculus, but (2) so far we have been unable to find any diagnostic morphological characters, even in the colour pattern. Our south-eastern candidate species may represent the descendants of an isolated refugial population from the glacial period ( Reinig 1935; Lecocq et al. 2015), which appears now to be surrounded to the west and north by a second weakly divergent lineage, and to the east in Turkey by possibly a third weakly divergent lineage (Figs 9–10). So far this broader south-east European (but not Turkish) population can be identified only from COI sequences, so evidence would be needed from another character source to corroborate its current evolutionary independence before it could be accepted as a separate species. As well as showing only weak divergence among them in their COI barcodes, all of these lineages show very little variation within them, which corroborates them being relatively recent.

More work is needed to assess the variation within the lapidarius -complex in south-eastern Europe, but until further evidence is available from other character sources to corroborate consistent groups as separate species, we regard these bees tentatively as conspecific, as parts of a single widespread species, B. lapidarius s. lat.

Diagnosis

Females

Queens medium-sized body length 18–21 mm, workers 11–16 mm. Can be distinguished in Europe and West Asia by their combination of the hair on the face black with the hair on the thoracic dorsum either black or with some cream or yellow but not with pure white and not entirely yellow (cf. B. sichelii, B. eriophorus, B. incertus, B. alagesianus, B. semenovianus). Queens can be distinguished (cf. B. simillimus) by the combination of the hair of the thoracic dorsum black with the wings clear.

Males

Body length 11–16 mm. Can be distinguished in Europe and West Asia by their combination of the hair posteriorly on the thoracic dorsum and on T2 usually predominantly black and T4–7 bright red. Genitalia ( Fig. 194 View Figs 190‒198 ) with the gonostylus as long as broad, reduced as a rounded flat scale with the inner basal process reduced to a tooth (cf. rufipes- group, festivus- group, rufofasciatus -group); volsella with the inner distal corner broadly produced but without a narrow hook (cf. rufipes- group, festivus- group, rufofasciatus -group); penis valve head with the recurved inner hook just narrower than the narrowest part of the adjacent penis valve shaft (cf. B. eriophorus); eye unenlarged relative to female eye.

Material examined

Holotype

SWEDEN • ♀ (queen), holotype of Apis lapidaria Linnaeus, 1758 ( Day 1979); Uppland; C. Linnaeus leg.; LSL (examined PW).

Material sequenced (29 specimens, includes some sequences from Lecocq et al. 2015)

FRANCE • 1 ♀ (worker); Aquitaine, Le Fontanaud ; 45.314° N, 0.346° E; 14 Aug. 2007; C. Ratti leg.; BOLD seq: 3771B12; PCYU: ML329 View Materials GoogleMaps 1 spec.; Eyne; 42.3024° N, 2.0106° E; M. Terzo leg.; GenBank seq: KC915850 View Materials ; UMONS: ML284 GoogleMaps .

SWITZERLAND • 1 ♀ (worker); Valais, St Luc ; 46.2210° N, 7.6202° E; 22 Jul. 1999; P. Williams leg.; NHMUK seq: PW25 ; PW: ML186 GoogleMaps .

RUSSIA • 1 ♀ (worker); Chuvashia, Cheboksari ; 56.1165° N, 47.244° E; 30 Jul. 2010, A. Lastukhin leg.; BOLD seq: SHMEL-E10; CSPU: ML330 GoogleMaps .

MOROCCO • 1 spec.; Asni; 31.2499° N, 7.9833° W; K. Warncke leg.; GenBank seq: KJ572861 View Materials ; UMONS: ML193 GoogleMaps .

SPAIN • 1 spec.; 39.4208° N, 0.8158° W; T. Lecocq leg.; GenBank seq: KC915889 View Materials ; UMONS: ML192 GoogleMaps 1 spec.; Camprodón ; 42.3136° N, 2.3719° E; D. Michez leg.; GenBank seq: KC915724 View Materials ; UMONS: ML274 GoogleMaps 1 spec.; Buñol ; 39.4208° N, 0.8158° W; T. Lecocq leg.; GenBank seq: KC915826 View Materials ; UMONS: ML275 GoogleMaps 1 spec.; Buñol ; 42.9511° N, 5.6578° W; T. Lecocq leg.; GenBank seq: KC915831 View Materials ; UMONS: ML276 GoogleMaps .

IRELAND • 1 spec.; Dublin; 53.3414° N, 6.2769° W; R. Moermans leg.; GenBank seq: KC915738 View Materials ; UMONS: ML282 GoogleMaps .

BELGIUM • 1 spec.; Nouvelles; 50.4144° N, 3.9794° E; T. Lecocq leg.; GenBank seq: KC915670 View Materials ; UMONS: ML278 GoogleMaps .

FINLAND • 1 spec.; Nåt̂; 60.0464° N, 19.9731° E; B. Cederberg leg.; GenBank seq: KC915660 View Materials ; UMONS: ML277 GoogleMaps .

AUSTRIA • 1 spec.; M̹hl; 47.5014° N, 10.7361° E; D. Michez leg.; GenBank seq: KC915689 View Materials ; UMONS: ML279 GoogleMaps .

ITALY • 1 spec.; S. Margherita; 44.7158° N, 9.2087° E; M. Cornalba leg.; GenBank seq: KC915719 View Materials ; UMONS: ML281 GoogleMaps 1 spec.; Salcito ; 41.7447° N, 14.5147° E; T. Lecocq leg.; GenBank seq: KC915714 View Materials ; UMONS: ML194 GoogleMaps 1 spec.; Cellara ; 39.215° N, 16.3825° E; T. Lecocq leg.; GenBank seq: KC915871 View Materials ; UMONS: ML271 GoogleMaps 1 spec.; Villadoro ; 37.6814° N, 14.3047° E; T. Lecocq leg.; GenBank seq: KC915876 View Materials ; UMONS: ML272 GoogleMaps 1 spec.; Piano Provenzana ; 37.7994° N, 15.0647° E; T. Lecocq leg.; GenBank seq: KC915881 View Materials ; UMONS: ML273 GoogleMaps .

SLOVENIA • 1 spec.; Studenčice; 46.3722° N, 14.1575° E; T. Lecocq leg.; GenBank seq: KC915710 View Materials ; UMONS: ML386 GoogleMaps .

UKRAINE • 1 spec.; Lastiosti; 48.7172° N, 24.525° E; D. Michez leg.; GenBank seq: KC915844 View Materials ; UMONS: ML283 GoogleMaps .

TURKEY • 1 ♀ (worker); Erzingan, Yeniyol-Ahmitli ; 39.8926° N, 39.3676° E; 5 Aug. 2002; H. Hines leg.; BOLD seq: 6877H02; SC: ML418 GoogleMaps 1 ♀ (worker); Erzingan, Yeniyol-Ahmitli ; 39.8926° N, 39.3676° E; 5 Aug. 2002; H. Hines leg.; BOLD seq: 6877H03; SC: ML419 GoogleMaps .

SERBIA • 1 spec.; Belgrade; 44.7872° N, 20.4517° E; A. Cetkovic leg.; GenBank seq: KC915752 View Materials ; UMONS: ML387 GoogleMaps .

CZECH REPUBLIC • 1 spec.; Praha; 50.105° N, 14.4167° E; T. Lecocq leg.; GenBank seq: KC915695 View Materials ; UMONS: ML408 GoogleMaps .

SLOVAKIA • 1 spec.; Nitra; 48.3036° N, 18.1539° E; T. Lecocq leg.; GenBank seq: KC915797 View Materials ; UMONS: ML410 GoogleMaps .

HUNGARY • 1 spec.; Szentendre; 47.6633° N, 19.0719° E; T. Lecocq leg.; GenBank seq: KC915700 View Materials ; UMONS: ML409 GoogleMaps 1 spec.; Gárdony; 47.2011° N, 18.6442° E; T. Lecocq leg.; GenBank seq: KC915800 View Materials ; UMONS: ML411 GoogleMaps .

BULGARIA • 1 spec.; Beklemeto; 42.7789° N, 24.6142° E; T. Lecocq leg.; GenBank seq: KC915704 View Materials ; UMONS: ML280 GoogleMaps 1 spec.; same collection data as for preceding; GenBank seq: KC915802 View Materials ; UMONS: ML407 GoogleMaps .

Global distribution

(European widespread grassland, often lowland, species extending into the margins of North Africa and West Asia) North Africa: MOROCCO. – Europe: SPAIN, UK, IRELAND, FRANCE, BELGIUM, NETHERLANDS, DENMARK, GERMANY, POLAND, SWEDEN, FINLAND, SWITZERLAND, AUSTRIA, CZECH REPUBLIC, SLOVAKIA, ITALY, HUNGARY, ROMANIA, BULGARIA, SLOVENIA, SERBIA, ALBANIA, MONTENEGRO, MACEDONIA, GREECE, UKRAINE, RUSSIA: European Russia, Crimea, Ural. – West Asia: TURKEY. (NHMUK, PW, ZMHB.) The species is widespread and often abundant.

The distribution of this species is known to extend eastwards into Russia as far as Arkaim Nature Reserve, Chelyabinsk Oblast ( AB: 52.65° N, 59.60° E).

Behaviour

Colonies of this species have been described ( Alford 1975; Benton 2006; Goulson 2010). Food-plant generalists ( Alford 1975; Rasmont 1988; Benton 2006; Goulson 2010). Male mate-searching behaviour is patrolling ( Alford 1975; Benton 2006; Goulson 2010).

PW

Paleontological Collections

PCYU

The Packer Collection at York University

NHMUK

Natural History Museum, London

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Insecta

Order

Hymenoptera

Family

Apidae

Loc

Bombus lapidarius ( Linnaeus, 1758 )

Williams, Paul H., Altanchimeg, Dorjsuren, Byvaltsev, Alexandr, Jonghe, Roland De, Jaffar, Saleem, Japoshvili, George, Kahono, Sih, Liang, Huan, Mei, Maurizio, Monfared, Alireza, Nidup, Tshering, Raina, Rifat, Ren, Zongxin, Thanoosing, Chawatat, Zhao, Yanhui & Orr, Michael C. 2020
2020
Loc

Bombus bisiculus

Lecocq T. & Biella P. & Martinet B. & Rasmont P. 2019: 7
2019
Loc

Bombus lapidarium

Berezin M. V. & Beiko V. B. & Berezina N. V. 1996: 118
1996
Loc

Bombus flavescens

Knechtel W. K. 1963: 712
Smith F. 1852: 45
1963
Loc

Bombus luctuosus

Benoist R. 1928: 212
Ball F. J. 1920: 32
Schmiedeknecht H. L. O. 1878: 388
1920
Loc

Bombus lapidarius var. carpaticus

Friese H. 1905: 518
1905
Loc

Bombus lapidarius

Perez J. 1890: 152
1890
Loc

Bombus lapidarius

Radoszkowski O. 1884: 63
1884
Loc

Bombus albicans

Schmiedeknecht H. L. O. 1878: 405
1878
Loc

Bremus truncorum

Panzer G. W. F. 1805: 85
1805
Loc

Bremus regelationis

Panzer G. W. F. 1805: 56
1805
Loc

Apis coronata Geoffroy in Fourcroy, 1785: 449

Fourcroy A. F. 1785: 449
1785
Loc

Apis Audens Harris, 1776: 130

Harris M. 1776: 130
1776
Loc

Apis Strenuus Harris, 1776: 131

Harris M. 1776: 131
1776
Loc

Apis Opis Harris, 1776: 137

Harris M. 1776: 137
1776
Loc

Apis Pertristis Harris, 1776: 137

Harris M. 1776: 137
1776
Loc

Apis

Fabricius J. C. 1776: 246
1776
Loc

Apis Lapidaria Linnaeus, 1758: 579

Linnaeus C. 1758: 579
1758