Dalmasula parvimana (Simon) Platnick & Abrahim & Álvarez-Padilla & Andriamalala & Baehr & Baert & Bonaldo & Brescovit & Chousou-Polydouri & Dupérré & Eichenberger & Fannes & Gaublomme & Gillespie & Grismado & Griswold & Harvey & Henrard & Hormiga & Izquierdo & Jocqué & Kranz-Baltensperger & Kropf & Ott & Ramírez & Raven & Rheims & Ruiz & Santos & Saucedo & Sierwald & Szüts & Ubick & Wang, 2012

Platnick, Norman I., Abrahim, Naiara, Álvarez-Padilla, Fernando, Andriamalala, Daniela, Baehr, Barbara C., Baert, Léon, Bonaldo, Alexandre B., Brescovit, Antonio D., Chousou-Polydouri, Natalia, Dupérré, Nadine, Eichenberger, Beata, Fannes, Wouter, Gaublomme, Eva, Gillespie, Rosemary G., Grismado, Cristian J., Griswold, Charles E., Harvey, Mark S., Henrard, Arnaud, Hormiga, Gustavo, Izquierdo, Matías A., Jocqué, Rudy, Kranz-Baltensperger, Yvonne, Kropf, Christian, Ott, Ricardo, Ramírez, Martín J., Raven, Robert J., Rheims, Cristina A., Ruiz, Gustavo R. S., Santos, Adalberto J., Saucedo, Alma, Sierwald, Petra, Szüts, Tamás, Ubick, Darrell & Wang, Xin-Ping, 2012, Tarsal Organ Morphology and the Phylogeny of Goblin Spiders (Araneae, Oonopidae), With Notes on Basal Genera, American Museum Novitates 2012 (3736), pp. 1-52 : 43-46

publication ID

http://doi.org/ 10.1206/3736.2

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03FC1036-6D31-DD63-FE9E-555EE5B3FA48

treatment provided by

Carolina

scientific name

Dalmasula parvimana (Simon)
status

new combination

Dalmasula parvimana (Simon)   , new combination

Figures 242–247 View FIGURES 233–247

Salsula parvimanus Simon, 1910: 178   (male holotype from Rooibank , Erongo, Namibia, in ZMB; examined).

Sulsula parvimana: Roewer, 1942: 281   .

DIAGNOSIS: Males resemble those of D. lorelei   but have a much shorter embolus, which extends only about half as far as the conductor (figs. 246, 247).

MALE (PBI_OON 822, figs. 242–247): Total length 1.77. Posterior eye row straight from front. Chelicerae anterior face unmodified. Epigastric furrow unmodified. Leg spination: tibia

IV p1-0-0, v1p-0-2; metatarsus IV v0-1p-0. Embolus extending only about half as far as divergent, translucent conductor.

FEMALE: Unknown.

MATERIAL EXAMINED: Only the male holotype   ( ZMB 32720 View Materials ,   PBI _ OON 822 )   .

DISTRIBUTION: Namibia (Erongo).

Dalmasula tsumkwe Platnick and Dupérré   , new species

Figures 248–262 View FIGURES 248–262

TYPES: Male holotype, female allotype, and female paratype from the CDM Camp at Tsumkwe, Bushmanland   , Otjozondjupa, Namibia (May 1993; S. Green), deposited in   NMNW (43119, PBI _ OON 33771 View Materials )   .

ETYMOLOGY: The specific name is a noun in apposition taken from the type locality.

DIAGNOSIS: Males can easily be distinguished by the cheliceral apophysis near the fang (figs. 250, 251), females by the very small ridges at the front of the genital area (figs. 260, 261). MALE (PBI_ OON 33771 View Materials , figs. 248–255): Total length 2.68. Posterior eye row straight from front. Chelicerae anterior face with conical apophysis. Epigastric furrow unmodified. Leg spination: tibia IV p0-0-1, v0-0-1p, r0-0-1; metatarsi: I, II v0-0-2; III v0-0-2; IV p1-2-1. v1p-2-2. r0-0-1. Embolus only slightly longer than conductor; conductor apparently fused with embolus. FEMALE (PBI_ OON 33771 View Materials , figs. 256–262): Total length 3.18. Chelicerae without apophyses. Palpal spination: tibia p0-1-2; tarsus p0-1-2, v0-1-2, r0-2-2. Leg spination: tibiae: III p0-1-1; IV p0-1-1, v0-0-2, r0-0-1; metatarsi: I v0-0-1p; II p0-0-1, v0-0-2; III v0-0-2; IV p0-2-2, v1p- 1p-2, r0-1-1. Anterior edge of weak epigastric scutum with pair of paramedian, sharply recurved ridges.

OTHER MATERIAL EXAMINED: None.

DISTRIBUTION: Namibia (Otjozondjupa).

Dalmasula griswoldi Szüts and Ubick   , new species

Figures 263–299 View FIGURES 263–277 View FIGURES 278–292 View FIGURES 293–307

TYPES: Male holotype, female allotype, and three male and one female paratypes taken from dunes to the north of Muizenberg , 34°06′S, 18°27′E, Western Cape, South Africa (June 16–30, 1991; R. Legg) GoogleMaps   , deposited in MRAC (173912, PBI _ OON 36053 View Materials )   .

ETYMOLOGY: The specific name is a patronym in honor of Charles Griswold, who first discovered the South African members of this genus.

DIAGNOSIS: Males differ from those of the other Dalmasula species   in having a more complex embolar region with a dorsal lobe terminating in two ribbonlike lamellae and a broad ventral lobe terminating in a slender spiral prong (figs. 275–288); females differ in having an epigynum with the anteromedian coupling ridges C-shaped and widely separated, and an internal median process with a slender stalk and a rounded head (figs. 293–299).

MALE (PBI_ OON 36091 View Materials , figs. 263–288): Total length 2.33. Posterior eye row procurved from front. Chelicerae anterior face unmodified. Epigastric furrow with anterior margin swollen, glabrous, with median projection (extrusion through torn cuticle?). Leg spination: tibiae: I, II p1-1-0; III p1-1-0, r1-1-0; IV d1-0-0, v0-0-2, r1-0-1; metatarsi: I, II p1-1-1; IV d1-1-2, p1-1-0, r1-1-1. Embolar opening apparently between bases of dorsal lamellae; distal portion of bulb terminating in two main divisions: dorsal lobe, with two distal lamellae, and ventral lobe, broad basally with distal attenuation, thin, twisted, in contact with dorsal lamellae.

FEMALE (PBI_ OON 36091 View Materials , figs. 289–299): Total length 3.05. Palpal spines absent. Leg spination: tibiae: I p1-1-0, v1-1-2, r1-1-0; II d1-1-1, p1-1-0, v1-1-2;,r1-1-0; III d1-1-1, p1-1-1, v1-1-1, r1-1-0; IV d1-1-1, p1-1-0, v1-1-1, r1-1-0; metatarsi: I p1-1-1, v1-1-1, r1-1-1; II d1-1-1, p1-1-1, v1-1-1, r1-1-1; III d1-1-1, v1-1-0, r1-1-1; IV d1-1-1, p1-1-1, v1-1-2, r1-1-1. Gonopore margins swollen, densely setose, anteriorly with pair of median pockets, evenly curved, separated; dorsally, anterior margin with median process, stalked, with round head bearing pores and strands; posterior margin with pair of lateral apodemes and oval posterior receptaculum.

OTHER MATERIAL EXAMINED: South Africa: Western Cape: dunes to N of Muizenberg , 34°06′S, 18°27′E, May 19–June 2, 1991 ( R. Legg, MRAC 173909 View Materials , PBI _ OON 36091 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   , 3♂, 4♀.

DISTRIBUTION: South Africa (Western Cape).

Dalmasula dodebai Szüts and Ubick   , new species

Figures 300–307 View FIGURES 293–307

TYPE: Female holotype taken in pitfall trap at Koiingnaas , 30°21.357′S, 17°19.664′E, Northern Cape, South Africa (July 13, 2007; C. Lyons, J. Mingo), deposited in GoogleMaps   PPRI ( PBI _ OON 36069 View Materials )   .

ETYMOLOGY: The specific name is a patronym in honor of the Belgian arachnologist Domir De Bakker, in recognition of his assistance at the MRAC throughout the visit there during which Tamás Szüts found the specimen described here, formed by combining the first two letters of each of his names.

DIAGNOSIS: Females differ from those of the other Dalmasula species   in having an epigynum with the anteromedian coupling ridges straight and posteriorly contiguous, and an internal median process with a thick stalk and an angular head (figs. 306, 307).

MALE: Unknown.

FEMALE (PBI_ OON 36069 View Materials , figs. 300–307): Total length 2.69. Posterior eye row procurved from front. Palpal spines absent. Leg spination: tibiae: I, II d1-1-0, p1-1-0, v1-1-2, r1-1-0; III, IV d1-1-0, p1-1-0, v1-1-2, r1-1-0; metatarsi: I p1-1-1, v1-1-1, r1-1-1; II d1-1-1, p1-1-1, v1-1-1, r1-1-1; III d1-1-1, v1-1-1, r1-1-1; IV d1-1-0, p1-1-1, v1-1-2, r1-1-1. Gonopore with margins swollen, setose, anteriorly with pair of curved, median, posteriorly contiguous pockets; dorsally with anterior stalked process, shaft thick, as broad as head, posterior part with foliate lateral apodemes and large rounded receptaculum.

OTHER MATERIAL EXAMINED: None.

DISTRIBUTION: South Africa (Northern Cape).

Oonopinae   Simon

Oonopidae Simon, 1890: 80   .

Gamasomorphinae Petrunkevitch, 1923: 172.

“Pseudogamasomorphinae” (nomen nudum): Dumitresco and Georgesco, 1983: 103.

DIAGNOSIS: The bulk of the currently recognized oonopid genera (i.e., all those except Orchestina   , Sulsula   , Dalmasula   , Xiombarg   , Unicorn   , and Cortestina   ) are here assigned to the Oonopinae   , and are characterized by the absence of a heavily sclerotized, thick-walled sperm duct in the male palp. This absence presumably reflects a major transformation in palpal mechanics. With the exception of the New Zealand genus Kapitia   , all known oonopines have a distinctively clumped eye arrangement and a 3-3-2-2 tarsal organ receptor pattern.

RELATIONSHIPS: So far as is known, a 4-4-3-3 tarsal organ receptor pattern and an H-shaped eye arrangement are retained only in Kapitia   , suggesting that this enigmatic, seldom collected New Zealand genus is the sister group of all the other oonopines. Aside from the original description by Forster (1956), information on Kapitia   has been supplied only by Paquin et al. (2010), so we present below a redescription of the species. Of particular interest are the teeth on the tarsal claws (figs. 316, 317); it appears that the inner tooth row has been displaced entirely to the tip of the claw, presumably representing a stage in the loss of that tooth row.

Within the massive assemblage of remaining oonopine species united by the reduction to a 3-3-2-2 tarsal organ receptor pattern and a clustered eye arrangement, we can recognize only a few large groupings at this point. Platnick   and Dupérré (2010b) suggested that those genera with a distinctly sclerotized cephalothorax might form a monophyletic group; if so, then several genera that were classically placed in the Oonopinae   are actually more closely related to the classical gamasomorphines than to Oonops   and such similarly soft-bodied taxa as Heteroonops   and Oonopoides Bryant. These   anteriorly hard-bodied genera include at least Stenoonops Simon   , Australoonops Hewitt   , Scaphioides Bryant   , Khamisia Saaristo and van Harten   , and Longoonops Platnick and Dupérré. The   classical gamasomorphines might also represent a monophyletic subgroup of this enlarged group. It remains to be seen, for example, whether taxa in the Scaphiella   complex, where males have dorsal abdominal scuta that are lacking in females, or the similarly sexually dimorphic taxa in the Dysderina   complex, represent independent gains of dorsal scuta in males, or independent losses of dorsal scuta in females. However, even if the presence of a dorsal scutum does not turn out to be a synapomorphy of the classical gamasomorphines, the movement of the male gonopore onto the epigastric scutum may well be synapomorphic for that group. Nevertheless, neither the classical nor the enlarged group could be recognized as a subfamily unless a separate subfamily were to be established for Kapitia   and the many other genera that (like Oonops   ) have both a soft-bodied cephalothorax and a soft-bodied abdomen can also be shown to constitute a monophyletic group (i.e., a smaller Oonopinae   ). At present, we know of no potentially synapomorphic characters supporting that smaller group.

ZMB

Museum für Naturkunde Berlin (Zoological Collections)

NMNW

National Museum of Namibia

R

Departamento de Geologia, Universidad de Chile

MRAC

Musée Royal de l’Afrique Centrale

PPRI

ARC-Plant Protection Research Institute, National Collection of Fungi: Culture Collection

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Arachnida

Order

Araneae

Family

Oonopidae

Genus

Dalmasula

Loc

Dalmasula parvimana (Simon)

Platnick, Norman I., Abrahim, Naiara, Álvarez-Padilla, Fernando, Andriamalala, Daniela, Baehr, Barbara C., Baert, Léon, Bonaldo, Alexandre B., Brescovit, Antonio D., Chousou-Polydouri, Natalia, Dupérré, Nadine, Eichenberger, Beata, Fannes, Wouter, Gaublomme, Eva, Gillespie, Rosemary G., Grismado, Cristian J., Griswold, Charles E., Harvey, Mark S., Henrard, Arnaud, Hormiga, Gustavo, Izquierdo, Matías A., Jocqué, Rudy, Kranz-Baltensperger, Yvonne, Kropf, Christian, Ott, Ricardo, Ramírez, Martín J., Raven, Robert J., Rheims, Cristina A., Ruiz, Gustavo R. S., Santos, Adalberto J., Saucedo, Alma, Sierwald, Petra, Szüts, Tamás, Ubick, Darrell & Wang, Xin-Ping 2012
2012
Loc

Sulsula parvimana:

Roewer, C. F. 1942: 281
1942
Loc

Salsula parvimanus

Simon, E. 1910: 178
1910
Loc

Oonopidae

Simon, E. 1890: 80
1890