Apricia longipalpis, Richardson, Barry J., 2016

Richardson, Barry J., 2016, New genera, new species and redescriptions of Australian jumping spiders (Araneae: Salticidae), Zootaxa 4114 (5), pp. 501-560: 518-521

publication ID

http://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4114.5.1

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:8F950473-E021-4704-9DA7-9AA9A259C5C3

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03E487E9-FFE2-E63C-FF59-8F52E2C9FEC1

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Apricia longipalpis
status

sp. nov.

Apricia longipalpis  sp. nov.

Figs 50–66View FIGURES 50 – 57View FIGURES 58 – 66

Type material. Holotype: M, Tinda Creek, N.S.W., Australia, 146.85 °E, 32.72 °S, 17 Oct. 1987, M. Żabka (AMS KS 64903); Paratype: 1 F, as for holotype (same vial).

Other material examined. AUSTRALIA: QUEENSLAND: 1 imm., Kuranda, 145.63 °E, 16.81 °S, Mar. 1951, G. Brooks ( MVMA BJR 1368); 1 imm., Toohey Forest, near Brisbane, 153.02 °E, 27.47 °S, 15 Aug. 1986, J. Rienks & Hill (QM S 3617); 1 M, 1 imm., Benaraby Rest Area, 151.32 °E, 24.00°S, 20 Jul. 1992, A.F. Longbottom ( WAM T 130216); NEW SOUTH WALES: 1 M, 100 km S of Singleton, 150.72 °E, 33.37 °S, 17 Oct. 1987, M. Żabka (AMS KS 64907); 2 M, 1 F, 110 km S of Singleton, 150.72 °E, 33.42 °S, 17 Oct. 1987, M. Żabka (AMS KS 64906); 1 M, Penrith, 150.07 °E, 33.75 °N, 11 Dec. 1896, Ramsay (AMS KS 117611View Materials); AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL TERRITORY: 2 M, 3 imm., Wombat Creek, 6 km NE of Piccadilly Circus, 148.85 °E, 35.32 °S, Feb. 1985, T.A. Weir, J. Lawrence & M-L. Johnson ( ANIC 42 000692).

Etymology. Reflects the very long palps that clearly distinguish this species from others in the genus ( Fig. 65View FIGURES 58 – 66). To be treated as a Latin adjective.

Remarks. Specimens of this species often are placed in Apricia jovialis  in collections, due to some similarities in form and colour patterns.

Diagnosis. This species can be most easily separated from A. bracteata  and A. jovialis  by the length of the tibia and the patella of the male palp (each twice the length of the cymbium compared to each half the length of the cymbium in the other species in the genus, Fig. 65View FIGURES 58 – 66). The tibial apophysis is strongly built and square in shape in A. longipalpis  ( Fig. 80View FIGURES 77 – 86), narrower with a rounded end in A. bracteata  ( Figs 42, 44View FIGURES 40 – 49) and narrow and pointed in A. jovialis  ( Fig. 27View FIGURES 25 – 31). The embolus is short and stubby in A. jovialis  ( Fig. 26View FIGURES 25 – 31) and long and thin in the other two species ( Figs 42, 43View FIGURES 40 – 49, 59View FIGURES 58 – 66). It arises from a distinct mound on the anterior distal edge of the tegulum in all three species, however in A. bracteata  this is small unlike the other two species.

In the female in each species there is a gland/diverticulum arising on the lateral edge of the spermatheca. In A. jovialis  ( Fig. 28View FIGURES 25 – 31) this is relatively small and arises posterior to the entry point of the insemination duct. In A. bracteata  ( Figs 45, 46View FIGURES 40 – 49) the positioning is the same but the gland is relatively large and directed laterally away from the spermatheca. In M. longipalpis  ( Figs 61, 62View FIGURES 58 – 66) the gland is slightly shorter, the entrance lies immediately above that of the insemination duct and then moves directly along the top of the duct; it may in fact be fused onto the top of it.

Description. Male: Holotype: Cephalothorax ( Figs 50, 51View FIGURES 50 – 57) long and flat, dark brown, lighter pattern on the pars thoracica, mid to dark orange, darker on the sides. There are patches of pennate grey hairs all over the cephalothorax, and along the sides. Clypeus ( Fig. 53View FIGURES 50 – 57) dark brown, narrow, without a thick fringe of long white hairs. Chelicerae mid to dark brown, straight. Two medium sized promarginal teeth (one larger than the other) and one medium sized, unident, retromarginal tooth ( Fig. 52View FIGURES 50 – 57). Endites and labium brown grading to yellow distally ( Fig. 52View FIGURES 50 – 57). Sternum brown. Abdomen long and elliptical, dorsal surface dark brown with a distinctive light brown pattern ( Fig. 50View FIGURES 50 – 57), covered with scattered mid-brown hairs. Spinnerets large, varying in colour to match the abdomen. Ventral abdomen dark brown. Legs grading backwards from very robust to lightly built and from dark brown (L 1 and L 2) to mid brown. L 1 with short sparse grey fringe on patella and tarsus. Palps ( Figs 58–60View FIGURES 58 – 66) long, narrow and dark brown. The length of the tibia and the patella each twice the length of the cymbium ( Fig. 65View FIGURES 58 – 66). The tibial apophysis is strongly built and square in shape, curving inwards in the top quarter of its length. Cymbium long, narrow. Tegulum long, with a large proximal lobe. The embolus long and, after arising from a distinct mound on the anterior distal edge of the tegulum, forms a clockwise quarter circle. Dimensions: CL 3.84, EFL 1.36, CW 3.10, AEW 1.98, AMEW 1.30, PEW 2.04, AL 4.52, P 1 +T 1 3.65, L 1 7.99 (2.48 + 1.67 + 1.86 + 1.30 + 0.68), L 2 6.93 (2.04 + 1.42 + 1.61 + 1.18 + 0.68), L 3 5.88 (1.80 + 0.99 + 1.05 + 1.30 + 0.74), L 4 7.80 (2.23 + 1.30 + 1.80 + 1.49 + 0.99).

Female: Paratype: As for the male, except leg colours lighter and L 1 less robust ( Figs 54–57View FIGURES 50 – 57). Epigyne: no obvious evidence of guides ( Figs 61–64View FIGURES 58 – 66). Copulatory openings indistinct. Insemination ducts first move laterally a short distance then move in a posterior direction until joining the prolateral edge of the spermatheca. A medium sized gland or diverticulum lies immediately above that of the insemination duct and moves directly along the top of the duct; perhaps being fused onto the top of it. It enters the spermatheca immediately above the entrance of the insemination duct. The spermatheca is rounded with the short fertilization ducts opening from the anterior edge of the spermatheca. Dimensions: CL 3.34, EFL 1.24, CW 2.54, AEW 1.73, AMEW 1.11, PEW 1.80, AL 3.84, P 1 +T 1 2.23, L 1 4.71 (1.49 + 0.99 + 0.99 + 0.68 + 0.56), L 2 4.71 (1.49 + 0.99 + 0.99 + 0.68 + 0.55), L 3 5.20 (1.67 + 1.05 + 0.99 + 0.93 + 0.56), L 4 5.14 (1.30 + 1.11 + 0.49 + 0.68 + 0.56).

Distribution and biology. Whilst known from only a few specimens and probably uncommon, it is widespread in a range of habitats in temperate and subtropical parts of eastern Australia ( Fig. 66View FIGURES 58 – 66). Accordingly, its IUCN status would be LC. The BIOCLIM prediction suggests its range may include parts of Victoria and South Australia. It has been found under bark on eucalypts.

WAM

Western Australian Museum

NEW

University of Newcastle

ANIC

Australian National Insect Collection

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Arachnida

Order

Araneae

Family

Salticidae

Genus

Apricia