Glaphyromorphus othelarrni, Hoskin & Couper, 2014

Hoskin, Conrad J. & Couper, Patrick J., 2014, Two new skinks (Scincidae: Glaphyromorphus) from rainforest habitats in north-eastern Australia, Zootaxa 3869 (1), pp. 1-16: 3-8

publication ID

http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.3869.1.1

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:16D13388-B967-4400-8709-24A127A1B455

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4930858

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03DEC73D-856A-FFC8-FF3E-FF109E47B0CD

treatment provided by

Felipe

scientific name

Glaphyromorphus othelarrni
status

sp. nov.

Glaphyromorphus othelarrni   sp. nov.

Cape Melville Bar-lipped Skink

( Figs 1 View FIGURE 1 , 2 View FIGURE 2 , 3A View FIGURE 3 , 4A View FIGURE 4 , 5A View FIGURE 5 )

Material examined: Holotype: QMJ 93341 View Materials , Melville Range (14°16'33" S, 144°29'32" E, elevation 460 m a.s.l.), Cape Melville, north-east Queensland, C. J. Hoskin & H. B. Hines, 13 December 2013 GoogleMaps   . Paratypes: QMJ 93339 View Materials ,   QMJ 93340 View Materials   , collection details as for holotype; QMJ 92570 View Materials ,   QMJ 92571 View Materials   , Melville Range (14°16'33" S, 144°29'32" E, elevation 460 m a.s.l), C. J. Hoskin, 20 March 2013 GoogleMaps   ; QMJ 92553 View Materials ,   QMJ 92554 View Materials   , Melville Range (14°18'55" S, 144°29'50" E, 110 m a.s.l.), C. J. Hoskin & K. Aland, 9 February 2013 GoogleMaps   .

Diagnosis. Glaphyromorphus othelarrni   sp. nov. is diagnosed from all congeners in having: adpressed limbs in contact; more than 27 midbody scale rows; the prefontal separated from the preocular; large body size (max SVL ~ 93mm); usually eight supralabials (with 6 th below centre of eye); more than 13 subdigital lamellae beneath 4 th finger; more than 21 lamellae beneath 4 th toe.

Etymology. Othelarrni means ‘He Listens’ and this was a name given to Bob Flinders, who was born in the Cape Melville area and who passed on much of the knowledge and responsibility for that country to the current generation of its Traditional Owners. The species was named by the bubu gudjin of Cape Melville, the Traditional Owners who have the responsibility to speak for the land where the species live.

Measurements and scale counts of holotype QMJ93341 View Materials ( Figs 1 View FIGURE 1 , 2 View FIGURE 2 , 3A View FIGURE 3 , 4A View FIGURE 4 ). SVL = 75.4 mm, AG = 37.3 mm, TL = 140 mm, L1 = 19.9 mm, L2 = 29.6 mm, HL = 14.5 mm, HW = 11.4 mm, NL = 13.5 mm, midbody scale rows = 28, paravertebrals = 58, lamellae 4 th toe = 25, lamellae 4 th finger = 15, supralabials = 8, supralabial below centre of eye = 6 th infralabials = 7, supraciliaries = 7.

Description of type series. Data presented as range followed by mean in brackets (n = 7, unless stated otherwise). Adult measurements (mm): SVL = 75.4–92.9 (85.3), AG = 37.3–49.6 (43.9), Tail = 140.0–144.0 (142.0), L1 = 18.3–20.7 (19.7), L2 = 29.6–32.9 (30.8), HL = 14.5–17.0 (16.0), HW = 11.4–13.1 (12.1), NL = 12.5–15.5 (13.9) (Table 1). Adult proportions (as % SVL): AG = 49–53 (51), Tail = 147–186 (173), L1 = 22–26 (24), L2 = 33–41 (38), HL = 18–20 (19), HW = 13–15 (14), NL = 14–18 (16) (Table 1). Body: elongate. Neck broad and not well differentiated from back of head. Snout rounded in profile. Limbs moderate, pentadactyl, and overlapping when adpressed. Scalation: Scales smooth, with rounded posterior margins; 28–30 (mean = 28.3) rows at midbody; paravertebral scales only slightly enlarged (except enlarged nuchals) and numbering 55–61(mean = 58.9) in a line between the parietals and the posterior margin of the hindlimb. Nasals moderate, well-spaced with a relatively large external naris; rostral and frontonasal in moderate contact; prefrontals large, moderately to narrowly separated and not contacting 1 st preocular; frontal contacting frontonasal, prefrontals, first two supraoculars, frontoparietals and narrowly separated or in point contact with 1 st supraciliary; supraoculars 4, second the largest; supraciliaries 7–8 (mean = 7.3), first the largest; frontoparietals paired and distinct from interparietal; parietals in contact behind interparietal; 7–9 (mean = 7.9) nuchal scales; primary temporals 1; secondary temporals 2, upper largest and overlapping lower; loreals 2; preoculars 2; presuboculars 2; an enlarged subocular scale penetrating the suture between the 5 th and 6 th supralabials; supralabials 8, 6 th below centre of eye (except QMJ93339 View Materials , which has 9 on the left side, with 7 th below centre of eye); infralabials 6–7 (mean = 6.7); postmental contacting 2 infralabials on each side; lower eyelid scaly; ear opening round or vertically oval, without lobules and with tympanum moderately recessed; lamellae under 4 th finger 14–15 (mean = 14.3); lamellae under 4 th toe 22–25 (mean = 23.3). Colour pattern in preservative ( Figs 3A View FIGURE 3 , 4A View FIGURE 4 ): Dorsal ground colour light to dark brown, immaculate ( QMJ92570 View Materials ) or with black spots ( QMJ93339 View Materials ) or transverse bars anteriorly ( QMJ93341 View Materials ). Lateral surfaces with longitudinally aligned flecks or vertical wavy bars, which are most prominent on the neck but extend to forebody before breaking up into a series of black flecks that extend to the groin and base of tail. The upper labials are predominantly light with dark vertical bars along sutures. Venter immaculate cream except for a grey tinge on the belly and chest of some individuals. Dark grey flecking present along edge of jaw and lower neck.

Colour pattern in life ( Figs 1 View FIGURE 1 , 2 View FIGURE 2 , 5A View FIGURE 5 ). As for preserved specimens but colours richer and appearance generally more glossy. The dorsum is distinctly copper-coloured on lighter individuals.

Comparison with similar species. Glaphyromorphus othelarrni   sp. nov. can only be confused with G. fuscicaudis   , G. nigricaudis   and G. nyanchupinta   sp. nov. It is readily distinguished from all three species by its supralabial count (typically 8 with 6 th below centre of eye vs typically 7 with 5 th below centre of eye) ( Fig. 4A View FIGURE 4 ), the number of subdigital lamellae beneath the 4 th finger (14–15 vs <14) and 4 th toe (mean 23 vs means of 18–21), and its relatively longer limbs (L1/SVL: 0.22–0.26 vs ≤ 0.22; L2/SVL: 0.33–0.41 vs ≤ 0.34) (Table 1). It is further distinguished from G. fuscicaudis   in having a proportionately larger head (HW/SVL: 0.13–0.15 vs 0.12–0.13; HL/ SVL: 0.18–20 vs 0.16–0.17); shorter interlimb length (AG/SVL 0.49–0.53 vs 0.52–0.58); and generally fewer paravertebral scales (mean 59 vs 64) (Table 1). It also lacks the series of yellow dorsolateral blotches that are prominent in G. fuscicaudis   ( Figs 5A, 5C View FIGURE 5 ). Glaphyromorphus othelarrni   sp. nov. is further distinguished from G. nigricaudis   in having a proportionately shorter interlimb length (AG/SVL 0.49–0.53 vs 0.52–0.60); a more robust form (WT/SVL 0.17–0.22 vs 0.09–0.17); more midbody scale rows (28–0.30 vs 24–28); and more paravertebral scales (55–61 vs 51–56) (Table 1). It is further distinguished from G. nyanchupinta   sp. nov. in being larger in all measures (e.g., SVL 74.5–92.9 vs 49.2–53.6); in having a proportionately longer tail (TL/SVL 1.47–1.86 vs 1.00); a more robust form (WT/SVL 0.17–0.22 vs 0.04–0.06); more midbody scale rows (28–30 vs 25–27) (Table 1); and a less patterned dorsum (dorsal pattern breaks up beyond midbody vs pattern present to hindlimbs) ( Figs 5A, 5B View FIGURE 5 ), and less patterned upper labials (upper labials predominantly pale with dark sutures vs upper labials predominantly dark with a central pale dot) ( Fig. 4A, 4B View FIGURE 4 ).

Distribution. Known only from the Melville Range, Cape Melville, north-eastern Australia ( Fig. 6 View FIGURE 6 ). Glaphyromorphus othelarrni   sp. nov. has been recorded in three areas: in the vicinity of the type locality in the western uplands (14°16'33" S, 144°29'32" E, 450–520 m a.s.l.), around the highest peak in the Melville Ra.(14°16'59" S, 144°29'59" E, 600 m a.s.l.), and in the lowlands at the south of the range (14°18'55" S, 144°29'50" E, 110 m a.s.l.).

Habitat and habits. Found in rocky areas in rainforest ( Fig. 7 View FIGURE 7 ). All individuals were found where thick leaflitter had accumulated at the base of boulders or amongst boulders (e.g., Fig. 7B View FIGURE 7 ). Skinks were observed active in the leaf-litter, on adjacent rock surfaces, and amongst crevices between the boulders. When pursued the skinks retreated deep into the leaf-litter or into rock crevices. Activity was greatest in the couple of hours before dusk, and during this period the skink was commonly encountered wherever there were boulders in the rainforest. Most individuals were missing at least one digit (e.g., the 5 th toe on the right hindfoot in Figure 2 View FIGURE 2 ), and some individuals were missing all fingers or toes on a foot. The reason for this was not resolved. The other skinks found in sympatry at G. othelarrni   sp. nov. sites were Eulamprus brachysoma ( Lönnberg & Andersson, 1915)   , Bellatorias frerei ( Günther, 1897)   , Saproscincus saltus Hoskin, 2013   , an undescribed species of Carlia   (Hoskin, in press), and a species of Lygisaurus   (Hoskin & Hines, under investigation).