Dermacentor auratus Supino, 1897

Petney, Trevor N., Boulanger, Nathalie, Saijuntha, Weerachai, Chitimia-Dobler, Lidia, Pfeffer, Martin, Eamudomkarn, Chatanun, Andrews, Ross H., Ahamad, Mariana, Putthasorn, Noppadon, Muders, Senta V., Petney, David A. & Robbins, Richard G., 2019, Ticks (Argasidae, Ixodidae) and tick-borne diseases of continental Southeast Asia, Zootaxa 4558 (1), pp. 1-89: 19

publication ID

http://doi.org/ 10.11646/zootaxa.4558.1.1

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:71232906-9C90-4A6E-B893-83AC1574C8CA

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4541903

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03DD87C4-FFCA-FFE5-1EFC-DE59FBD6FAEF

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Dermacentor auratus Supino, 1897
status

 

Dermacentor auratus Supino, 1897  

This is an Oriental Region species found in moist broadleaf forests (Guglielmone et al. 2014). The adults infest wild pigs (Sus spp.), with occasional records from humans, Indian rhinoceros, domestic pigs and python. Nymphs occur on squirrels, small and large carnivores, porcupine, other rodents, monkeys and wild hens ( Hoogstraal and Wassef 1985a). This is the most widely distributed Asian Dermacentor   species ( Petney and Keirans 1996a). It has been reported from Cambodia, Lao PDR, peninsular Malaysia, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam ( Hoogstraal and Wassef 1985a; Apanaskevich and Apanaskevich 2015b). Males and females were redescribed by Wassef and Hoogstraal (1984a) and the life history of an Indian population under laboratory conditions was described by Bhat et al. (1974b). The mark-release studies of Lim (1973) on “ D. auratus   ”, although useful, are unclear with respect to the Dermacentor   species involved (classified as wide spur and closed spur species). They do show that survival can be quite long-term, with ca. 25% recaptures 9 months after release. Horizontal movement was substantial, with some specimens being found 100 m from their point of release, although most specimens moved much less. Vertically, they could be found up to about 2 m above the ground, but usually less than 50 cm.

Descriptions of the male and female are available in Wassef and Hoogstraal (1984a).

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Arachnida

Order

Ixodida

Family

Ixodidae

Genus

Dermacentor