Neozygina Dietrich & Dmitriev, 2006

Dietrich, C. H. & Dmitriev, D. A., 2007, Revision of the New World leafhopper genus Neozygina Dietrich & Dmitriev (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae: Typhlocybinae: Erythroneurini), Zootaxa 1475, pp. 27-42: 28

publication ID

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5077708

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:94D58D6A-8BB6-428F-BB98-91FA42CF1614

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5077708

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03CC87D9-FF85-FFB5-DBA4-FEFD2B7092BE

treatment provided by

Felipe

scientific name

Neozygina Dietrich & Dmitriev, 2006
status

 

Neozygina Dietrich & Dmitriev, 2006  

Diagnosis. Crown weakly to moderately produced medially, with pair of large brown or black preapical spots; mesonotum with basal triangles usually dark brown, contrasting with remainder of sclerite; forewing lacking distinct spots or oblique patterns, inner apical cell with base oblique; male pygofer with dorsal appendage well developed (except N. obsoleta   , n. sp.), immovably fused to pygofer margin; one or more macrosetae present basad of dorsal appendage; ventral appendage present, usually elongate. Style apex truncate, footlike, with only two points, preapical lobe well developed. Connective U-shaped, without median anterior lobe, arms short. Aedeagus with dorsal apodeme well developed, usually T-shaped in posterior view, without sclerotized connection to dorsal pygofer appendage or anal tube; shaft often with paired or unpaired basal or distal processes, or both; unpaired basal process, when present, closely appressed to shaft.

Distribution. Western United States south to Argentina.

Notes. Phylogenetic analysis of morphological data recovered Neozygina   as the monophyletic sister group to a clade comprising the New World genera Mexigina   , Hepzygina   , and Zyginama ( Dietrich & Dmitriev 2006)   . The genus previously included 10 described species, 1 of which is here treated as a junior synonym. An additional 16 species discovered during this study are described below. The following key will separate adult males; females of most species may only be reliably identified through their association with males.