Drosophila (Sophophora) bakoue Tsacas & Lachaise, 1974

Yassin, Amir, Suwalski, Arnaud & Raveloson Ravaomanarivo, Lala H., 2019, Resolving the synonymy and polyphyly of the ‘ Drosophila bakoue species complex’ (Diptera: Drosophilidae: ‘ D. montium species group’) with descriptions of two new species from Madagascar, European Journal of Taxonomy 532, pp. 1-26: 8

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.5852/ejt.2019.532

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:1301752E-3FD5-4F3E-A4F3-6766D18C709A

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5696372

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03C87F64-FFAB-FF8C-8EC0-4C7CFC67A66A

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Drosophila (Sophophora) bakoue Tsacas & Lachaise, 1974
status

 

Drosophila (Sophophora) bakoue Tsacas & Lachaise, 1974  

Fig. 2 View Fig

Drosophila (Sophophora) bakoue Tsacas & Lachaise, 1974: 197   .

Diagnosis

Male with sex combs on the two first tarsomeres of the foreleg and completely yellow abdominal tergites; surstylus without dorsal tooth-like protuberance.

Type material

Holotype

IVORY COAST • ♂; Lamto ; 6°13′ N, 5°02′ W; 22 Dec. 1970; D. Lachaise leg.; MNHN. GoogleMaps  

Distribution

Ivory Coast (type), Benin, Cameroon, Congo, Gabon, Malawi, Nigeria, and São Tomé Island (new location).

Remarks

D. bakoue   resembles the species of the ‘ D. nikananu   species complex’ Tsacas & Chassagnard, 1992 in males having completely yellow abdominal tergites. However, it differs from the species of the ‘ D. nikananu   species complex’ in males having sex combs on the two first tarsomeres of the foreleg (the comb is lost or reduced on the second tarsomere in the ‘ D. nikananu   species complex’) and lacking a dorsal tooth-like protuberance on the surstylus.

Lachaise (1979) attributed a laboratory strain collected from Makoukou ( Gabon) to this species, and showed that it could produce fertile F 1 females and sterile F 1 males when its females were crossed with males of the strain of D. vulcana   of Bock & Wheeler (1972). Rafael (1984) attributed another strain from Kunden ( Cameroon) to D. bakoue   and showed that it could not hybridize with the same strain of D. vulcana   or with the strain of D. tsacasi   of Bock & Wheeler (1972). Intriguingly, Rafael (1984) pointed out that both the Gabonese and Cameroonian strains of D. bakoue   showed some differences in body size and pigmentation from the type material from Ivory Coast. She also found that the Cameroonian strain hybridized readily with D. malagassya   , though both F1 sexes were sterile. Kopp (2016) analyzed a strain collected from the island of São Tomé and attributed to D. bakoue   by J.R. David, and found that it produced sterile F 1 males and females when crossed with the same strain of D. tsacasi   . Da Lage et al. (2007) analyzed the sequence of the nuclear gene Amyrel from a strain collected from Benin and found it to be sister to the strain of D. tsacasi   of Bock & Wheeler (1972). Prigent et al. (2017) partially sequenced the mitochondrial gene COI from two specimens from Mount Oku in Cameroon and did not recover such affinity ( Fig. 2 View Fig ). These results suggest that at least two different species may have been attributed to D. bakoue   , from which the strains from Benin and São Tomé are closely related to D. tsacasi   , whereas the strains from Gabon and Cameroon are distant. The relation of these species with the true D. bakoue   from Ivory Coast needs more investigations.

MNHN

Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Insecta

Order

Diptera

Family

Drosophilidae

Genus

Drosophila

Loc

Drosophila (Sophophora) bakoue Tsacas & Lachaise, 1974

Yassin, Amir, Suwalski, Arnaud & Raveloson Ravaomanarivo, Lala H. 2019
2019
Loc

Drosophila (Sophophora) bakoue

Tsacas & Lachaise 1974: 197
1974