Anogdus rileyi Peck and Cook

Peck, Stewart B. & Cook, Joyce, 2013, A revision of the species of Anogdus LeConte of the United States and Canada (Coleoptera: Leiodidae: Leiodinae: Leiodini), Insecta Mundi 2013 (290), pp. 1-27: 17

publication ID

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5175801

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:D5CC54FF-BAAB-425F-95F2-A7C91CA5C5DE

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03B63950-FFC6-DC6E-FF6A-FDEA126DFF2D

treatment provided by

Felipe

scientific name

Anogdus rileyi Peck and Cook
status

new species

Anogdus rileyi Peck and Cook   , new species

( Fig. 27, 28 View Figures 19–32 , 36 View Figure 36 )

Diagnostic description. Length (pronotum + elytra) = 1.80–2.56 mm; greatest width = 1.20–1.60 mm. Head punctation fine and sparse on front, becoming coarser and more dense on vertex. Antennal club slender; antennomere 7 narrower than 9 and 10; antennomere 8 narrow, disk-like; apical antennomere narrower than 9 and 10. Sides of pronotum rounded, posterior angles broadly obtuse. Pronotal punctures fine, separated by 1–3 diameters. Elytral strial punctures round and deep, separated by ± 1 diameter; interstrial punctures minute, distantly spaced; elytral epipleura inconspicuously setose. Metasternal anterior margin with a row of moderately small, round, deep punctures; sides of metasternum rugose. Protarsi and mesotarsi of male broadly expanded and bearing white setae. Male mesotibia curved, inner margin weakly sinuate; mesotibial process triangular, curved, apex passing behind large tibial spine. Metafemur slender; in males the lower margin may be serrate with a broad expansion before apex with a small, acute tip. Abdominal sternites III–VII each with a row of closely spaced, round, deep punctures of about equal size at anterior margin. Median lobe of aedeagus ( Fig. 27, 28 View Figures 19–32 ) elongate, broad, curved dorsoventrally, flattened toward apex. Parameres slender, apically expanded, extending beyond apex of median lobe. Armature of internal sac as in Fig. 27, 28 View Figures 19–32 .

Type material (n=74). Holotype, male, in TAMU, with label data: “ USA: TEXAS: Travis Co. / Bull Creek arm of Lake Austin ,/ 30° 21.060’N, 97°47.211’W / XII-1-2006 - II-14-2007, FIT-grd./ E.G. Riley-et al. 585” GoogleMaps   . Paratypes, 73, as follows: same data as holotype (26, TAMU; 15, SBPC) GoogleMaps   ; same data except “ II- 15-III-27-2007, FIT-ground/ E.G. Riley-et al.-607” (10, TAMU) GoogleMaps   ; “ TEXAS: Burnet Co. Inks / Lake State Pk. Pecan / Flat Cpgd. 21.v.89/ R. Anderson, Pecan// juniper leaf litter berl.” (1, TAMU) GoogleMaps   ; “ TEXAS: Ellis Co. / 3.6 mi. NE Italy / 32.21752°N, 96.93389°W,/ IV-2-V-8-2008, FIT-ground/ Coll. E.G. Riley, et al.” (1, TAMU) GoogleMaps   ; “ TEXAS: Hays Co. / 6 mi. NW Dripping Springs / 30°13,554’N, 98°11.039’W / II- 25-III-30-2006, FIT-ground/ 1,340’, E.G. Riley, et al.-301/ Juniperus managed plot” (1, TAMU) GoogleMaps   ; same data except “ IV-28-VI-2-2006, FIT-grd./ E.G. Riley, et al.-392/ Juniperus unmanaged plot” (1, TAMU) GoogleMaps   ; same data except “ III-31-IV-26-2006, FIT-grd./ E.G. Riley, et al.-340/ Juniperus managed plot” (1, TAMU) GoogleMaps   ; same data except “ III-31-IV-27-2006, FIT-grd./ E.G. Riley, et al.-353/ Juniperus unmanaged plot” (1, TAMU) GoogleMaps   ; “ TEXAS: Kerr Co. / 6.5 mi. SW Hunt , 1,960’/ 29°59.409’N, 99°23.244’W,/ XI-12-XII-15-2005, FIT-grd./ E.G. Riley, et al.-210/ upland deciduous forest” (2, TAMU) GoogleMaps   ; same data except “ III-31-IV-27-2006, FITgrd./E.G. Riley, et al.-366” (3, TAMU) GoogleMaps   ; same data except “ IV-28-VI-2-2006, FIT–grd./ E.G. Riley, et al.-405 (1, TAMU); same data except “ VI-3-30-2006, FIT-ground/ E.G. Riley, et al.-444” (1, TAMU) GoogleMaps   ; same data except “ XI-16-2005 - I-26-2006, FIT-G/ E.G. Riley, et al.-249” (6, TAMU) GoogleMaps   ; same data except “ II- 23-III-30-2006, FIT-grd./ E.G. Riley, et al.-327” (3, TAMU) GoogleMaps   .

Distribution. Known only in the United States in the southern state of Texas ( Fig. 36 View Figure 36 ).

Seasonality. Adult records are scattered through most of the year, but mostly from the cooler winter months. Almost all specimens were taken in flight intercept traps.

Bionomics. The dominant habitat is upland deciduous forest and open juniper scrub. Etymology. This species is named in recognition of Edward G. Riley, Associate Curator of Texas A & M University Insect Collection, who collected almost all of the known specimens of this species.

TAMU

Texas A&M University

R

Departamento de Geologia, Universidad de Chile

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Insecta

Order

Coleoptera

Family

Leiodidae

Genus

Anogdus