Pinodytes sequoia Peck & Cook, 2011

Peck, Stewart B. & Cook, Joyce, 2011, Systematics, distributions and bionomics of the Catopocerini (eyeless soil fungivore beetles) of North America (Coleoptera: Leiodidae: Catopocerinae) 3077, Zootaxa 3077 (1), pp. 1-118 : 34-35

publication ID

https://doi.org/ 10.11646/zootaxa.3077.1.1

persistent identifier

https://treatment.plazi.org/id/03B37553-3D55-A150-9DC0-FEACFD8D0FDE

treatment provided by

Felipe

scientific name

Pinodytes sequoia Peck & Cook
status

new species

Pinodytes sequoia Peck & Cook , new species

( Figs. 23 View FIGURES 19–27 , 216–224 View FIGURES 216–223 View FIGURE 224 )

Type material. Holotype: male ( SBPC). UNITED STATES. California: Tulare Co., Carmoe Crevice , 18.XI.2003, J. Krejca, V. Loftin, JKK331B3 . Paratypes (62). UNITED STATES. California: with same data as holotype, 20 ( SBPC) ; Tulare Co., Carmoe Crevice , 5.VII.2004, J. Krejca, A. Gluesenkamp, JKK1D4, 1 ( SBPC) ; Tulare Co., Carmoe Crevice , 5.VII.2004, J. Krejca, A. Gluesenkamp, JKK5D2, 1 ( SBPC) ; Tulare Co., Hurricane Crawl Cave , 16.VII.2003, J. Krejca, A. Snow, V. Loftin, S. Fryer, JKK17A4, 1 ( SBPC) ; Tulare Co., Lost Soldier’s Cave , 23.VII.2003, J. Krejca, V. Loftin, JKK80A7, 1 ( SBPC) ; Tulare Co., Lost Soldier’s Cave , 6.VII.2004, J. Krejca, A. Gluesenkamp, N. Barth, JKK13D2, 1 ( SBPC) ; Tulare Co., Lost Soldier’s Cave , 9.XI.2003, J. Krejca, V. Loftin, K. Despain, JKK232B4, 1 ( SBPC) ; Tulare Co., Lost Soldier’s Cave , 9.XI.2003, J. Krejca, V. Loftin, K. Despain, JKK232B5, 5 ( SBPC) ; Tulare Co., Lost Soldier’s Cave , 21.VII.2003, J. Krejca, S. Fryer, C. Walck, JKK52A2, 1 ( SBPC) ; Tulare Co., Lost Soldier’s Cave , 23.VII.2003, J. Krejca, V. Loftin, JKK80A5, 2 ( SBPC) ; Tulare Co., Lost Soldier’s Cave , 9.XI.2003, J. Krejca, V. Loftin, K. Despain, JKK230B2, 2 ( SBPC) ; Tulare Co., Palmer’s Cave , 27.VII.2003, J. Krejca, V. Loftin, JKK081A4, 1 ( SBPC) ; Tulare Co., Palmer’s Cave , 28.VII.2003, J. Krejca, V. Loftin, S. Fryer, D. Bolano, JKK087A1, 1 ( SBPC) ; Tulare Co., Pet Cemetery Cave , 11.V.2004, J. Krejca, S. Fryer, J. Snow, P. Sprouse, JKK123C2, 2 ( SBPC) ; Tulare Co., Soldier’s Cave , XII.1977, A.G. Grubbs, 19 ( SBPC) ; Tulare Co., Three Rivers, N36.35° W118.77°, Lost Soldier’s Cave , 20.II.2010, 1212m, Graening, Audisio, 1 ( SBPC) GoogleMaps ; Tulare Co., Weiss Raum Cave , 10.V.2004, J. Krejca, P. Sprouse, S. Fryer, C. Walck, E. Olmbeck, JKK115C12, 2 ( SBPC) .

Material examined. We have examined 63 specimens.

Distribution. Specimens ( Fig. 224 View FIGURE 224 ) are known only from Tulare County, on the western side of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, California.

Diagnostic description. Total length 2.20–3.08 mm; greatest width 1.02–1.28 mm. Dark reddish brown; elongate-oval in shape ( Fig. 23 View FIGURES 19–27 ). Head. Finely, sparsely punctate; with up to four large punctures on vertex; microsculpture of vertex reticulate to substriate. Eyes absent. Antenna ( Fig. 216 View FIGURES 216–223 ) with antennomere 3 longer than 2; antennomeres 4–6 subequal; antennomere 7 longer but not wider than 8; antennomeres 9 and 10 each with a single sensory vesicle indicated apically by a protruding flange. Pronotum. Finely punctate with several larger punctures near apical margin; microsculpture moderately strong, substriate. Widest at base, sides roundly tapering to apex; apical margin emarginate, basal margin straight; apical angles rounded, basal angles rectangular. Elytra. Punctation moderately strong and dense, in longitudinal rows, some rows weakly impressed; punctures joined transversely by fine strioles. Joined elytra slightly narrower than pronotum, nearly parallel in basal one-half, narrowing to apex; basal one-third serrate laterally. Legs. Protibia ( Fig. 217 View FIGURES 216–223 ) narrow, straight; apex and outer margin spinose; inner margin with dense, fine spines on apical one-half. Mesotibia ( Fig. 218 View FIGURES 216–223 ) narrow, straight, with strong spines on entire outer margin and apically; inner margin with fine spines on apical one-half. Metatibia ( Fig. 219 View FIGURES 216–223 ) elongate, narrow, straight, spinose apically; apical two-thirds of outer margin with fine spines, a stronger spine at about onefourth from apex; fine spines on apical two-fifths of inner margin. Metafemur ( Fig. 219 View FIGURES 216–223 ) moderately slender in both sexes. Male protarsomeres ( Fig. 217 View FIGURES 216–223 ) not expanded, bearing elongate setae laterally and thin, broad, colorless phanerae ventrally. Mesotarsomeres without phanerae. Venter. Mesoventrite ( Fig. 223 View FIGURES 216–223 ) carinate; longitudinal carina irregularly serrate posteriorly, expanded in anterior one-half, depressed but not excavated behind transverse carina. Male genitalia. Median lobe of aedeagus ( Figs. 220, 221 View FIGURES 216–223 ) broad, abruptly narrowed before flattened apex. Inverted internal sac ( Fig. 221 View FIGURES 216–223 ) with a transverse dentate sclerite and a cluster of short, broad spines. Parameres ( Figs. 220, 221 View FIGURES 216–223 ) broad, elongate, with thin, deflexed apices; each bearing two setae before apex; apices extending beyond apex of median lobe. Spermatheca. Globose ( Fig. 222 View FIGURES 216–223 ).

Notes. All specimens are known from caves but this does not mean that the species can be categorized as a specialized cave inhabitant (troglobite). At best it would be classed as a troglophile, because it shows modifications only for soil habitats, as do all other species in the genus. Caves are a secondary habitat for the collection of soil beetles. This shows that sampling has been extensive in cave habitats and that no sampling has been done in the southern Sierra Nevada Mountains for soil inhabiting beetles.

Etymology. The name sequoia , a noun in apposition, refers to the distribution of this species in Sequoia

National Park, Tulare Co., California .

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Insecta

Order

Coleoptera

Family

Leiodidae

Genus

Pinodytes