Phrynocephalus,

Macey, Robert, Schulte, James A., Ananjeva, Natalia B., Van, Erik T., Wang, Yuezhao, Orlov, Nikolai, Shafiei, Soheila, Robinson,, 2018, A molecular phylogenetic hypothesis for the Asian agamid lizard genus Phrynocephalus reveals discrete biogeographic clades implicated by plate tectonics, Zootaxa 4467 (1), pp. 1-81: 48-51

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4467.1.1

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:A32A352B-C63E-4679-A3D9-63A85F966045

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/038B87F8-FFE1-FFEE-FF37-0160F79AFC0C

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Phrynocephalus
status

 

E. Phrynocephalus  Size Diversity

Phrynocephalus  show a variety of snout vent lengths and tail lengths, ( Table 6, Appendix 5). Body size per sample ranged from 106 mm for P. mystaceus  to 35 mm for P. vindumi  and P. interscapularis  . Tail length per sample ranges from 133 mm for P. maculatus  population 1 to 35 mm for P. luteoguttatus  population 2. P. mystaceus  and P. interscapularis  are sympatric in the Caspian Basin, and habitat partition with P. mystaceus  in large floating sand dunes, with P. interscapularis  living on the edge of those large sand dunes, which may revolve around ecotype evolution in a predator-prey relationship. In northwestern Iran P. vindumi  replaces the role of P. interscapularis  , and is sympatric with P. mystaceus  . Tail length appears to be the most sexually dimorphic characteristic.

Snout vent lengths for clay ecotypes range from 62 mm for P. przewalskii  population 1 to 49 mm for P. versicolor  , with tail lengths ranging from 90 mm for P. przewalskii  population 1 to 49 mm for P. persicus  .

The snout vent length for gravel ecotypes range from 64 mm for P. vlangalii  population 1 to 40 mm for P. rossikowi  , with tail lengths ranging from 90 mm for P. longicaudatus  to 42 mm for P. theobaldi  .

Snout vent lengths for dry lakebed ecotypes range from 90 mm for P. maculatus  population 1 to 60 mm for P. golubewii  , with tail length ranging from 133 mm for P. maculatus  population 1 to 78 mm for P. maculatus  population 2.

Snout vent lengths for small sand dune ecotypes range from 61 mm for P. vlangalii  population 2 to 35 mm for both P. vindumi  and P. interscapularis  , with tail length ranging from 80 mm for P. przewalskii  population 2 to 35 mm for P. luteoguttatus  population 2.

Snout vent lengths for large sand dune ecotypes range from 106 mm for P. mystaceus  populations to 59 mm for P. salenskyi  population 1, with tail lengths ranging from 110 mm for P. mystaceus  population 1 to 70 mm for P. salenskyi  population 1.

The largest Phrynocephalus  occupy large floating sand dunes, and the smallest Phrynocephalus  species are found on the fringes of large floating sand dunes in the Caspian Basin and northern Iran. P. mystaceus  occupying large sand dunes in these habitats coexists with the two smallest species that occupy the fringes of those sand dunes, P. interscapularis  in the Caspian Basin, and P. vindumi  in northwestern Iran. It has not escaped our attention that size and habitat partitioning may have occurred in these regions because it is likely that smaller species ( P. interscapularis  or P. vindumi  ) serve as a food source for larger species ( P. mystaceus  ). Further work is needed for phylogenetic assessment of size evolution among Phrynocephalus  species and populations considering the sexually dimorphic nature of this genus, both with body size and tail length.

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Chordata

Class

Reptilia

Order

Squamata

Family

Agamidae