Heterocarpus corona, Yang & Chan & Chu, 2010

Yang, Chien-Hui, Chan, Tin-Yam & Chu, Ka Hou, 2010, Two new species of the “ Heterocarpus gibbosus Bate, 1888 ” species group (Crustacea: Decapoda: Pandalidae) from the western Pacific and north-western Australia *, Zootaxa 2372 (1), pp. 206-220: 210-216

publication ID

http://doi.org/ 10.11646/zootaxa.2372.1.19

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03878B30-D672-6676-6999-169EB83BFD2F

treatment provided by

Felipe

scientific name

Heterocarpus corona
status

sp. nov.

Heterocarpus corona   sp. nov.

( Figs. 2 View FIGURE 2 , 3D–F View FIGURE 3 , 4G–H View FIGURE 4 , 5C–D View FIGURE 5 )

Heterocarpus gibbosus   .— De Man 1920: 163, pl. 14–fig. 39. — King 1984: 184, fig. Hg. — Chace 1985: 29 (part), fig. 17c, d. — Chan & Yu 1987: 54 (part), pl. I C. — Hanamura & Takeda 1987: 107. — Wadley & Evans 1991: 17. — Hanamura & Evans 1996: 6. [nec Bate 1888].

Material examined. Holotype: Vanuatu, “ SANTO 2006 ”, stn AT 10, 15°41.1’S, 167°00.5’E, 509–659 m, 17.IX.2006, ov. female 32.6 mm cl (MNHN-Na 17190) GoogleMaps   . Paratypes: Vanuatu, “ SANTO 2006 ”, stn AT9, 15°41.5’S, 167°01.3’E, 481 m, 17.IX.2006, 2 females 15.5–17.4 mm cl (MNHN-Na 17191); stn AT10, 15°41.1’S, 167°00.5’E, 509–659 m, 17.IX.2006, 1 ov. female 29.7 mm cl, 4 females 14.6–22.1 mm cl ( NTOU M00822 View Materials ) GoogleMaps   ; stn AT70, 15°40.7’S, 167°00.5’E, 517–614 m, 07.X.2006, 3 males 19.5–28.6 mm cl, 7 females 8.7–30.8 mm cl (MNHN-Na 17192); stn AT73, 15°40.8’S, 167°00.5’E, 514–636 m, 07.X.2006, 4 males 14.8– 24.5 mm cl, 8 females (1 ov.) 15.0– 30.6 mm cl (MNHN-Na 17193); stn AT90, 15°01.5’S, 166°54.1’E, 503– 553 m, 13.X.2006, 6 males 17.3–30.2 mm cl, 5 females (4 ov.) 17.2–35.5 mm cl (MNHN-Na 17194); stn AT100, 15°06.0’S, 166°51.4’E, 399–416 m, 14.X.2006, 3 males 18.2–29.0 mm cl (MNHN-Na 17195); stn AT102, 15°03.4’S, 166°52.9’E, 517–547 m, 15.X.2006, 6 males 15.0– 34.5 mm cl, 6 females (2 ov.) 11.5–32.4 mm cl (MNHN-Na 17196); stn AT105, 15°04.2’S, 166°57.0’E, 408–444 m, 15.X.2006, 3 females 12.7–34.0 mm cl (MNHN-Na 17197); stn AT106, 15°02.2’S, 166°55.4’E, 548–560 m, 16.X.2006, 1 male 30.5 mm cl, 1 ov. female 30.2 mm cl, 1 female 14.5 mm cl (MNHN-Na 17198); stn AT110, 15°01.6’S, 166°55.0’E, 567 m, 16.X.2006, 1 male 16.3 mm cl, 1 female 27.3 mm cl (MNHN-Na 17199); stn AT120, 15°40.4’S, 167°01.0’E, 431–445 m, 19.X.2006, 1 ov. female 29.5 mm cl (MNHN-Na 17200).

Non-type material examined. JAPAN: Off Kagoshima, 30°34.2'N, 130°13.3'E, 500 m, 03 GoogleMaps   / 04.IX.1985, 1 male 20.6 mm cl, 1 female 23.0 mm cl. (NFU). EAST   CHINA SEA: Block No. 441-8, 29°40.4’N, 127°33.5’E, 380–412 m GoogleMaps   , 21.X.1989, 1 female 32.5 mm cl (NFU 530-2-1837); Block No. 452-1, 29°23.4’N, 127°25.8’E, 410–416 m GoogleMaps   , 24.X.1999, 1 female 17.0 mm cl (NFU 530-2-1838). TAIWAN: Dasi fishing port, Yilan county, commercial trawler, IV   .1997, 2 males 24.2–27.8 mm cl, 1 female 24.1 mm cl ( NTOU M00823 View Materials )   ; 07.X.1999, 1 female 27.8 mm cl, ( NTOUM00824)   ; 10. IV.2000   , 1 female 23.3 mm cl ( NTOU M00825 View Materials ); 15.VIII.2002, 2 males 28.2–29.4 mm cl, 1 female 19.0 mm cl ( NTOU M00011 View Materials )   ; 06. V.2003   , 1 female 21.1 mm cl ( NTOU M00010 View Materials ); 19. VI.2003   , 1 female 31.0 mm cl ( NTOU M00828 View Materials ); 17.XII.2004, 1 female 23.4 mm cl ( NTOU M00845 View Materials )   ; 24. VI.2005   , 1 male 23.7 mm cl ( NTOU M00829 View Materials ); 15.IX.2005, 1 male 18.8 mm cl, ( NTOU M00794 View Materials ); III   .2006, 1 female 27.8 mm cl ( NTOU M00830 View Materials )   ; 01. VI.2007   , 1 male 26.4 mm cl ( NTOU M00831 View Materials ). — Nanfang-ao fishing port, Yilan county, commercial trawler, 16. III.1982   , 2 females 24.3–25.5 mm cl ( NTOU M00832 View Materials ); 16. III.1985   , 1 female 24.2 mm cl ( NTOU M00833 View Materials ); 20. IV.1985   , 1 female 22.2 mm cl ( NTOU M00834 View Materials ); 16. III.1988   , 1 male 22.3 mm cl ( NTOU M00835 View Materials ); 15. V.2003   , 1 female 25.7 mm cl ( NTOU M00012 View Materials ). PHILIPPINES: E. Luzon, “ AURORA 2007”, stn CP 2658, 15°59’N, 121°51’E, 422–431 m GoogleMaps   , 20. V.2007 GoogleMaps   , 1 female 15.6 mm cl ( NTOU M00837 View Materials ); stn CP 2660, 15°52’N, 121°50’E, 506–542 m, 20. V.2007   , 2 males 30.7–37.9 mm cl, 1 female 31.2 mm cl ( NTOU M00838 View Materials ); stn CC 2700, 14°46’N 123°11’E, 500–524 m, 27. V.2007 GoogleMaps   , 3 males 25.1–32.0 mm cl ( NTOU M00839 View Materials ); stn CP 2707, 15°05’N, 121°42’E, 368–442 m, 28. V.2007 GoogleMaps   , 1 male 32.0 mm cl, 1 female 36.1 mm cl ( NTOU M00840 View Materials ); stn CP 2730, 15°21’N, 121°34’E, 358–378 m, 31. V.2007 GoogleMaps   , 2 males 32.2–34.1 mm cl, 2 females 33.5–40.1 mm cl ( NTOU M00841 View Materials ); stn CP2734, 15°56’N, 121°49’E, 453–460 m, 01. VI.2007   , 3 females 15.3–26.8 mm cl ( NTOU M00842 View Materials ); stn CP 2735, 15°59’N, 121°50’’E, 431–442 m, 01. VI.2007 GoogleMaps   , 2 males 23.2–29.2 mm cl, 4 females 30.4–36.4 mm cl ( NTOU M00843 View Materials ); stn CP 2749, 15°56’N, 121°49’E, 473 m, 02. VI.2007   , 1 male 36.8 mm cl, 1 female 34.0 mm cl ( NTOU M00844 View Materials ). INDONESIA: Makassar, “CORINDON”, stn CH 217, 00°38'N 117°59'E, 470 m, 1 male 23.3 mm cl, 1 female 34.2 mm cl (MNHN-Pa 9903) GoogleMaps   . AUSTRALIA: NW coast, 13°28'S, 122°50'E, 425 m GoogleMaps   , 24.I.1990, 2 females 28.4, 38.1 mm cl (MP-Na 12726). SOLOMON ISLANDS: “SALOMON 1”, stn CP 1783, 8°32'S, 160°41'E, 399–700 m GoogleMaps   , 29.IX.2001, 3 males 10.3–23.9 mm cl ( NTOU M00577 View Materials ); stn CP 1792, 9°15'S, 160°08'E, 477–505 m GoogleMaps   , 30.IX.2001, 1 female 28.2 mm cl ( NTOU M00846 View Materials ); stn CP 1795, 9°18'S, 160°22'E, 442–451 m GoogleMaps   , 01.X.2001, 1 male 28.3 mm cl ( NTOU M00847 View Materials ); stn DW 1826, 9°56'S, 161°03'E, 418–432 m GoogleMaps   , 04.X.2001, 1 male 35.9 mm cl ( NTOU M00848 View Materials ); stn CP 1859, 9°32'S, 160°37'E, 283–305 m GoogleMaps   , 07.X.2001, 1 juvenile 12.3 mm cl ( NTOU M00849 View Materials )   . KIRIBATI: IV   . 1987, 400 m, 1 female 30.6 mm cl (MP- Na 12351); IV   . 1987, 600 m, 1 female 30.4 mm cl (MP-Na 12352). FIJI: “MUSORSTOM 10”, stn CP1341, 16°52'S, 177°43'W, 500–614 m GoogleMaps   , 10.VII.1998, 2 females 27.4–36.0 mm cl ( NTOU M00850 View Materials ); stn CP 1396, 16°39'S, 179°57'W, 591–596 m GoogleMaps   , 24.II.1999, 5 males 19.3–33.2 mm cl, 10 females 15.7–30.9 mm cl (MNHN- Pa 16246)   .

Description. Generally very similar to H. abulbus   , with the following distinguishing characters. Rostrum proper dorsally armed with 3–7 teeth, ventral margin bearing 6–13 teeth. Postrostral carina very highly elevated, bearing 4–6 teeth; basal rostral crest extremely high, maximum height 1.23–3.92 (mean 2.52) times as long as basal rostral height. Brachiostegal carina extending along 70–92% (mean 82%) carapace length ( Figs. 2A View FIGURE 2 , 3E View FIGURE 3 ). Abdominal tergites without spines; boss at abdominal somite III distinct, width 0.17–0.28 and length 0.60–0.85 times as long as somite ( Figs. 4 View FIGURE 4 C-D). Maxilliped III with exopod 0.15–0.47 (mean 0.26) times as long as antipenultimate segment ( Fig. 2H View FIGURE 2 ). Carpi of pereiopods II unequal, shorter one with 7–9 articles ( Fig. 2B View FIGURE 2 ), longer one with 21–25 articles ( Fig. 2C View FIGURE 2 ). Merus of pereiopod III bearing 5–10 mesial and 11–14 lateral spines ( Fig. 2E View FIGURE 2 ), those of pereiopods IV and V with 11–12 and 8 or 9 ventral spines, respectively ( Figs. 2 View FIGURE 2 F-G). Pereiopod III dactylus 0.24–0.35 times as long as propodus ( Fig. 2D View FIGURE 2 ).

Coloration. Body including antennular and antennal flagella dark pink to reddish-orange, abdomen often paler ( Fig. 5D View FIGURE 5 ). Basal rostral crest reddish and with a white margin on the teeth. Carapace often with thick red longitudinal stripe immediately below posterior half of postorbital carina. Eyes dark brown. Lateral abdomen with a thick but blurred red longitudinal line, being very distinct in juveniles. Pereiopods generally somewhat reddish in proximal half and pale pink in distal half, but occasionally reversed. Eggs dark brown.

Distribution. Known with certainty in the western Pacific from Japan, East China Sea, Taiwan, NE Philippines, Indonesia, NW Australia, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, Kiribati, Fiji and Tonga, at depths of 283– 750 m.

Etymology. The Latin “ corona   ” (crown) refers to the very high basal rostral crest of this species. The name is treated as a noun in apposition.

Remarks. The present new species is very close to H. gibbosus   and mainly differs in having a much higher basal rostral crest, and a distinct coloration. The basal rostral crest of H. corona   (CR ratio 1.46–3.92, mean 2.65, Figs. 3D–F View FIGURE 3 , 5C–D View FIGURE 5 ) is about two times higher than those of H. gibbosus   (CR ratio 1.00–1.99, mean 1.43, Figs. 3C View FIGURE 3 , 5B View FIGURE 5 ) and H. chani   (CR ratio 0.88–2.14, mean 1.33, Fig. 5E View FIGURE 5 ). Only the specimens from Fiji have the basal rostral crest relatively lower (CR ratio 1.46–2.50; Fig. 3F View FIGURE 3 ) than that of the other populations (CR ratio 2.51–3.92, Figs. 3D–E View FIGURE 3 , 5C–D View FIGURE 5 ). Furthermore, H. corona   is possibly unique in the genus by often having a distinct thick red stripe at the posterolateral carapace ( Fig. 5D View FIGURE 5 ). On the other hand, H. gibbosus   differs from the other species of the “ H. gibbosus   ” group in the meri of the posterior three pereiopods generally covering distinct short subdistal red bands ( Fig. 5B View FIGURE 5 ).

The original illustration of H. gibbosus   ( Bate 1888, pl. 112, fig. 2) shows a moderately high basal rostral crest, but the holotype is now badly damaged ( Li 2006; Li et al. 2007). A neotype has been selected for H. gibbosus   ( Li et al. 2007; ICZN Opinion 2217) and this species is now restricted to those with a moderately high basal rostral crest ( Fig. 5B View FIGURE 5 ). Heterocarpus corona   is mainly distributed from Japan to the Philippines, Indonesia, Australia and the south Pacific. Although only one specimen from Makassar is examined in the present study, all the “SIBOGA” material reported by De Man (1920: pl. 14, fig. 39) and some “ALBATROSS” Indonesian specimens illustrated by Chace (1985: fig. 17c, d) have very high basal rostral crests. The western Australian specimens ( Wadley & Evans 1991; Hanamura & Evans 1996) and those examined herein always have a very high basal rostral crest. Nevertheless, the photograph of a NW shelf specimen in Wadley & Evans (1991: 17) has the carapace almost entirely reddish. All the specimens examined from various south Pacific localities (e.g. Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, Kiribati and Fiji) have a very high basal rostral crest. The illustration provided by King (1984: fig. Hg) from the southwest Pacific Islands ( Fiji, Vanuatu and Tonga) also has very high basal rostral crest and this species is likely also found in Papua New Guinea ( King 1984, 1988). Specimens reported from the South China Sea and the central and western Philippines ( Crosnier 1988; Li 2006) appear to represent either the true H. gibbosus   or H. chani   . The two “ALBATROSS” specimens with a lower basal rostral crest from Indonesia ( Chace 1985: fig. 17a, b) likely represent either H. gibbosus   or H. chani   . Re-examination of the abundant “ALBATROSS” material reported by Chace (1985) will be necessary to determine the exact distribution of the four species of the “ H. gibbosus   ” group in the Philippines and Indonesia.

There are many records of H. gibbosus   from the Indian Ocean (see synonymy listed in Fransen 2006). In the present work only one specimen (“METEOR” stn Me-5/287-BMT, female 14 mm cl, RMNH D48661 View Materials ) reported by Fransen (2006) from the Gulf of Aden has been examined. Although another “METEOR” specimen from the Gulf of Aden illustrated by Fransen (2006: fig. 2) has a very low basal rostral crest, the female examined has a moderate high basal rostral crest and all the typical characters of H. gibbosus   including a distinct abdominal boss (see also Fransen 2006: fig. 8). The “ H. gibbosus   ” specimen reported from east of Sumatra by Balss (1925: fig. 67) was determined to be representing H. lepidus De Man, 1917   by Crosnier (1988). Only one illustrated account ( Wood-Mason & Alcock 1892: fig. 6) exists for the numerous Indian records of H. gibbosus   (see Fransen 2006), which shows a moderately high basal rostral crest and no abdominal boss. Fransen (2006) argued that H. nasicus Timofeew, 1993   described from the Gulf of Aden is highly likely to represent abnormal specimens of H. gibbosus   with regenerated rostra. Detailed studies on the Indian Ocean material of H. gibbosus   / H. nasicus   from various localities will be necessary to elucidate if more than one species is present there. Since H. nasicus   has a moderately high basal rostral crest and a distinct abdominal boss (see Timofeew 1993: fig. 2), it is very different from both H. corona   and H. abulbus   .

NTOU

Institute of Marine Biology, National Taiwan Ocean University

V

Royal British Columbia Museum - Herbarium

VI

Mykotektet, National Veterinary Institute

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Malacostraca

Order

Decapoda

Family

Pandalidae

Genus

Heterocarpus

Loc

Heterocarpus corona

Yang, Chien-Hui, Chan, Tin-Yam & Chu, Ka Hou 2010
2010
Loc

Heterocarpus gibbosus

Hanamura, Y. & Evans, D. R. 1996: 6
Wadley, V. & Evans, D. 1991: 17
Chan, T. - Y. & Yu, H. - P. 1987: 54
Hanamura, Y. & Takeda, M. 1987: 107
Chace, F. A. Jr. 1985: 29
King, M. G. 1984: 184
Man, J. G. de 1920: 163
1920