Thyreosthenius parasiticus (Westring 1851), Westring, 1851

Paquin, Pierre & Dupérré, Nadine, 2006, The spiders of Québec: update, additions and corrections, Zootaxa 1133, pp. 1-37: 18-19

publication ID

http://doi.org/ 10.5281/zenodo.273386

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:6744F78C-4CF2-4697-BC43-E637483651C3

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/038687FF-DC5F-FF94-FEF5-F92284CE74FD

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Thyreosthenius parasiticus (Westring 1851)
status

 

Thyreosthenius parasiticus (Westring 1851)  

( Figs 37–40 View FIGURES 33 – 40. 33 – 36 )

Material examined.— Canada: Québec: Brome­Missisquoi, Saint­Armand [45 °02’N, 73 °03’W] 04.ix. 2000, hand collecting under bark of dead tree, 1 Ψ, N. Dupérré & P. Paquin ( CPAD); Longueuil, Boucherville [45 ° 36 ’N, 73 ° 27 ’W] 01.x. 2000, hand collecting under bark, 1 Ψ, C. Chantal ( CPAD); Brome­Missisquoi, Saint­Armand [45 °02’N, 73 °03’W] 19.ix. 2004, hand collecting under wood beams, 1 ɗ 2 Ψ, P. Paquin & N. Dupérré ( CPAD); Gatineau, Aylmer [45 ° 23 ’N, 75 ° 49 ’W] 20.x. 1989, hand collecting in wood chips, 2 Ψ, L. LeSage ( CPAD); Parc de la Gatineau, Lac Brown [45 ° 36 ’N, 75 ° 55 ’W] 21.xi. 1991, leaf litter on margin of the lake, 1 ɗ 1 Ψ, R. Hutchinson & L. LeSage ( CNC).

Diagnosis.— The males are recognised by the long curved embolus (E) ( Fig. 37 View FIGURES 33 – 40. 33 – 36 ), the pointed anterior radical process (ARP) ( Fig. 37 View FIGURES 33 – 40. 33 – 36 ), and the shape of the palpal tibia ( Fig. 39 View FIGURES 33 – 40. 33 – 36 ). Females are recognised by the presence of a cusp­shaped knob (arrow) on the anterior portion of the epigynal plate ( Fig. 40 View FIGURES 33 – 40. 33 – 36 ), and the oblique slit­like copulatory openings (CO) ( Fig. 40 View FIGURES 33 – 40. 33 – 36 ).

Distribution.— Palearctic. In North America, the species is found on the eastern side of the continent from Newfoundland to Wisconsin, south to Ohio. An isolated record is known from Washington ( Crawford 1988).

Remark.— The occurrence of the species in Québec was suspected by Hutchinson & Bélanger (1994) who reported its occurrence from habitats related to forest and decaying wood, which is supported by the records given here. Interestingly, all the above specimens were collected in late summer –early fall.

CNC

Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids, and Nematodes