Xenos hamiltoni Kathirithamby and Hughes

Kathirithamby, Jeyaraney & Hughes, David P., 2006, Description and biological notes of the first species of Xenos (Strepsiptera: Stylopidae) parasitic in Polistes carnifex F. (Hymenoptera: Vespidae) in Mexico, Zootaxa 1104, pp. 35-45: 38-41

publication ID

http://doi.org/ 10.5281/zenodo.171410

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:39D63BE4-66BF-44B1-88D2-3BB030FCE71D

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5659923

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/CD1CF855-4D1F-FF94-EE5A-F9F212776D1B

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Xenos hamiltoni Kathirithamby and Hughes
status

new species

Xenos hamiltoni Kathirithamby and Hughes   , new species (Figs. 1–3)

Type. Holotype ɗ: MEXICO, Estación de Biología “Los Tuxtlas” UNAM, 8 May 2002, (D. Hughes) (Colección Nacional de Insectos, Instituto de Biologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City).

Paratypes. ɗ: MEXICO, Estación de Biologia “Los Tuxtlas” UNAM, 8 May 2002, (D. P. Hughes) (Colección Nacional de Insectos, Instituto de Biologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City). ɗ: (same data as above), (D. P. Hughes) (Colección Nacional de Insectos, Instituto de Biologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, as long as pro­ and mesothorax (scutum length, 0.32–0.35mm). Scutellum length: 0.42–0.45 mm. Postlumbium half the length of scutellum (length, 0.25–0.27 mm). Postnotum: twice as long as scutellum (length, 0.80–0.81 mm) ( Fig 3 View FIGURE 3 A).

Wing: R 1 is infuscated and interrupted in the middle; R 2 arises a little after this and is as long as R 3, R 4 not reaching margin, R 5 is short and arises below R 4, MA, CuA 1, CuA 2 and CuP present and uninterrupted. Length of wing (along its longest length) = 2.77–2.83 mm ( Fig 3 View FIGURE 3 C).

Length of IX th abdominal segment, 0.25–0.26 mm (Fig 1 D).

Length of adeagus, 0.24–0.27 mm ( Fig 3 View FIGURE 3 B).

Male cephalotheca. Length, 0.86–0.88 mm; width, 1.11–1.3 mm. The male cephalothecae extruded both between abdominal tergites and sternites (II–III, or III–IV or IV–V) ( Table 1 View TABLE 1 ).

Diagnosis. This is the nineteenth species of Xenos   to be described from Mesoamerica and the first from Mexico. The new species is distinguished by short, pointed maxillary palpi which fits in a socket of the basal segment. The aedeagus, with pointed anterior and posterior heads and a hump on the dorsal posterior region, and the lengths of the pro­and mesothorax, are more than a third of the length of the metathorax.

The new species can be distinguished from X. zikani   which has no basal maxilla segment, a long palpus which is 1 / 8 shorter than mandibles ( X. hamiltoni   has a long basal segment and very short palpus), R 3 arising close to R 4 and R 5 is absent in the wing (R 3 not arising close to R 4 and R 5 present in X. hamiltoni   ) and hump on dorsal posterior of aedeagus absent.

Etymology. The new species is named after the late Bill Hamilton FRS, who inspired us to study the behavioural ecology of the Strepsiptera   family Stylopidae   .

TABLE 1: Position of the extruded male pupae of Xenos hamiltoni sp. n. in the abdomen of the wasp Polistes carnifex F.

Number of male pupae Position on abdomen of Polistes  
1   IInd & IIIrd tergites
2   IIIrd & IVth tergites
2   IVth & Vth tergites
1   IVth & Vth sternites
2   IIIrd & IVth sternites
UNAM

Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico

FRS

Falconer Museum

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Insecta

Order

Strepsiptera

Family

Xeninae

Genus

Xenos