Passiflora foetida var. hispida (DC. ex Planch. and Triana) Killip ex Gleason

McQuate, Grant T., Liquido, Nicanor J. & Nakamichi, Kelly A. A., 2017, Annotated World Bibliography of Host Plants of the Melon Fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett) (Diptera: Tephritidae), Insecta Mundi 2017 (527), pp. 1-339 : 198-212

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5353580

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:AA9AB625-4CAB-49D9-A2AA-0C05F41E2076

persistent identifier

https://treatment.plazi.org/id/9D17878B-6EBC-5398-EF80-F97B360AFBB7

treatment provided by

Felipe

scientific name

Passiflora foetida var. hispida (DC. ex Planch. and Triana) Killip ex Gleason
status

 

Passiflora foetida var. hispida (DC. ex Planch. and Triana) Killip ex Gleason , see Passiflora foetida L.

Passiflora hastata Bertol. , see Passiflora foetida L.

Passiflora hibiscifolia Lam. , see Passiflora foetida L.

Passiflora hispida DC. ex Triana and Planch. , see Passiflora foetida L. Passiflora laurifolia L.

Family: Passifloraceae

Grin Nomen Number: 26981

Common Names: bell-apple (English), gelbe Grenadille (German), guldgrenadill (Swedish), Jamaica-honeysuckle (English), parcha (Spanish), pomme d’or (French), sweetcup (English), Wasserlimone (German), water-lemon (English), yellow granadilla (English) .

Native: SOUTHERN AMERICA – Caribbean: Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Cuba, Dominica, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Martinique, Montserrat, Puerto Rico, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and Grenadines; Northern South America: French Guiana, Guyana, Suriname, Venezuela; Western South America: Peru.

Cultivated: also cultivated.

Field Infestation:

Back and Pemberton 1917:

Hawaii, U.S.A.

The authors reported typically not finding P. laurifolia fruits (also referred to as water lemon) infested by B. cucurbitae either in the market or when growing wild, but noted that eggs laid in P. laurifolia fruits at a residence in Manoa Valley (on the Island of Oahu, Hawaii, U.S.A.) produced “noticeable deformities in shape and cracks in the rind,” and a few adult B. cucurbitae were recovered, but from just 1of the fruits.

+ Back and Pemberton 1918:

Hawaii, U.S.A.

Passiflora laurifolia (listed both as Passiflora sp. and as water lemon) is listed as “occasionally infested” by B. cucurbitae . The authors stated that adult melon flies have been reared from water lemon, but that water lemon does not serve regularly as a host; that it is attacked by melon fly only in rare instances, and then only slightly.

Listing Only: Cantrell et al. 1999; Holbrook 1967 (listed as “occasionally infested”); Kandybina 1987 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); + McBride and Tanada 1949 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as water lemon, Passiflora sp. , listed as rarely injured); Oakley 1950 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); Phillips 1946; + Rajamannar 1962 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as water lemon); USDA 1986 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); USDA-APHIS 2000; USDA-APHIS 2008; USDA-APHIS-PPQ 1983 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); USDA-APHIS-PPQ-CSDA 1984 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as a preferred host); White and Elson-Harris 1992 (authors state “requires confirmation”).

Passiflora ligularis Juss.

Family: Passifloraceae

Grin Nomen Number: 26982

Common Names: cranix (Spanish), granada-china (Spanish), granadilla (Spanish) , granadille (French), grenadille douce (French), maracujá (Portuguese-Brazil), sötgrenadill (Swedish), süsse Grenadille (German), sweet granadilla (English) .

Native: NORTHERN AMERICA – Southern Mexico: Mexico – Chiapas, Colima, Michoacan, Oaxaca, Puebla, Veracruz; SOUTHERN AMERICA – Central America: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Panama; Northern South America: Venezuela; Western South America: Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru.

Listing Only: Holbrook 1967 (listed as “occasionally infested”); USDA-APHIS-PPQ-CSDA 1984 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; insufficient data to justify regulation).

Passiflora macrocarpa Mast. , see Passiflora quadrangularis L.

Passiflora mollissima (Kunth) L. H. Bailey , see Passiflora tripartita (Juss.) Poir. var. mollissima (Kunth) Holm-Niels. and P. JØrg.

Passiflora quadrangularis L.

Family: Passifloraceae

Grin Nomen Number: 27001

Common Names: badea (Spanish), barbadin (Swedish), barbadine (French), giant granadilla (English) , granadilla (Spanish) , granadilla real (Spanish), grenadine (English), Königs-Grenadille (German), maracujá-açú (Portuguese-Brazil), maracujá-mamão (Portuguese-Brazil), maracujá-melão (Portuguese-Brazil), maracujá-uaçu (Portuguese-Brazil), Riesen-Grenadille (German).

Cultivated: Widely cultivated in tropics.

Origin: Neotropics.

Listing Only: Cantrell et al. 1999 (listed as Passiflora quandrangula ); Dhillon et al. 2005a; Holbrook 1967; Kapoor 1970 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); McBride and Tanada 1949 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); Narayanan and Batra 1960 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); Oakley 1950 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); Syed 1971 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); USDA 1986 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as Passiflora quadrangula ); USDA-APHIS-PPQ 1983 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); USDA-APHIS-PPQ-CSDA 1984 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; insufficient data to justify regulation); White and Elson-Harris 1992 (authors state “requires confirmation”).

Synonyms: Passiflora macrocarpa Mast. , Passiflora quadrangularis L. var. variegata

Passiflora quadrangularis L. var. variegata , see Passiflora quadrangularis L.

Passiflora seemannii Griseb.

Family: Passifloraceae

Grin Nomen Number: 415271

Common Names: guate guate (Spanish-Panama).

Native: SOUTHERN AMERICA – Central America : Costa Rica – Alajuela, Puntarenas ; Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama – Chiriqui, Cocle, Darien, Panama ; Western South America : Colombia – Antioquia, Cauca, Santander .

Listing Only: Dhillon et al. 2005a; Holbrook 1967 (listed as “rarely infested”); McBride and Tanada 1949 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as rarely injured); Narayanan and Batra 1960 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); Oakley 1950 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); Syed 1971 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); USDA 1986 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as Passiflora seemanni ); USDA-APHIS-PPQ 1983 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); USDA-APHIS-PPQ-CSDA 1984 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; insufficient data to justify regulation).

Passiflora spp.

Family: Passifloraceae

Grin Nomen Number: 300432

Field Infestation:

+ Swezey 1935:

Honolulu, Island of Oahu, Hawaii, U.S.A.

One (1) infested ripe Passiflora sp. fruit (listed as passion fruit) was collected from a garden in Manoa Valley, on the Island of Oahu, Honolulu, Hawaii. Thirty-three (33) B. cucurbitae pupae (listed as Chaetodacus cucurbitae [Coq.]) were recovered from which 8 adult B. cucurbitae and 23 adult Psyttalia fletcheri (listed as Opius fletcheri Silv. ) emerged.

Interception Data:

PestID 2016:

Hawaii, U.S.A.

Bactrocera cucurbitae was recovered by USDA-APHIS-PPQ (“interceptions”) from Passiflora sp. fruits, originating in Hawaii, at an airport in Hawaii (Honolulu) on two occasions in 2005. Recovery was 11 and 12 live larvae.

Listing Only: Botha et al. 2004 (listed as a secondary host); CABI 2016; Cantrell et al. 1999; Chawla 1966 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); Hollingsworth et al. 1996; Isnadi 1991 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); Kapoor 1970 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); +NAPPO, PAS 2015 (listed as passion-flower); Narayanan and Batra 1960 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); Plantwise Knowledge Bank 2015; Ponce 1937 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); + Rajamannar 1962 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as passion flower); + Ramadan and Messing 2003 (listed as passion fruit); Syed 1971 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); + Tsatsia and Hollingsworth 1997 (listed as passion fruit); USDA 1986 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); USDA-APHIS-PPQ 1983 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); Weems 1964 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as a wild host); Weems 1967 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as a wild host); Weems et al. 2001 (listed as a wild host); White and Elson-Harris 1992.

Synonyms: Tacsonia spp.

Passiflora subpeltata Ortega

Family: Passifloraceae

Grin Nomen Number: 312877

Common Names: white passionflower (English), white passionfruit (English), wild passionfruit (English), wild passionvine (English), weisse Passionblume (German), granadina (Spanish).

Native: NORTHERN AMERICA – Northern Mexico: Mexico – Zacatecas ; Southern Mexico: Mexico – Chiapas, Federal District , Hidalgo, Jalisco, Mexico, Michoacan, Morelas, Nayarit, Oaxaca, Puebla, Queretaro, Veracruz ; SOUTHERN AMERICA – Central America : Guatemala, Panama ; Northern South America : Venezuela ; Western South America : Colombia .

Cultivated: also cultivated.

Listing Only: Holbrook 1967 (listed as a “nonhost or host of undetermined status”).

Passiflora tripartita (Juss.) Poir. var. mollissima (Kunth) Holm-Niels. and P. JØrg.

Family: Passifloraceae

Grin Nomen Number: 400952

Common Names: banana passionflower (English), banana passionfruit (English), banana poka (English), bananadilla (English), Bananen-Passionsblume (German), Curuba (German), curuba (Swedish), curuba de Castilla (Spanish-Columbia), piesangdilla (Afrikaans), tacso (French), tacso (Spanish) , tacso de Castilla (Spanish-Ecuador) , tumbo (Spanish).

Native: SOUTHERN AMERICA – Western South America: Colombia; Ecuador; Peru.

Naturalized: AFRICA – Macaronesia : Portugal – Madeira Islands; East Tropical Africa: Kenya; South Tropical Africa: Zambia; Southern Africa: South Africa – Limpopo, Western Cape; ASIA-TROP- ICAL – Indian Subcontinent: India; Sri Lanka; AUSTRALASIA – Australia: Australia – New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria; New Zealand: New Zealand; PACIFIC – North-Central Pacific: United States – Hawaii.

Cultivated: widely cultivated.

Interception Data:

PestID 2016:

Hawaii, U.S.A.

Bactrocera cucurbitae was recovered by USDA-APHIS-PPQ (“interceptions”) from Passiflora mollissima (synonym of P. tripartita ) fruit(s), originating in Hawaii, at an airport in Hawaii (Honolulu) on one occasion in 2004. Recovery was four live larvae.

Synonyms: Passiflora mollissima (Kunth) L. H. Bailey , Tacsonia mollissima Kunth

Peponia parviflora var. trilobata Cogn. , see Coccinia trilobata (Cogn.) C. Jeffrey

Persea americana Mill.

Family: Lauraceae

Grin Nomen Number : 27393

Common Names: abacate (Portuguese), abokado (Japanese Rōmaji), aguacate (Spanish), avocado (English), Avocado (German), avocado (Swedish), Avocadobaum (German), Avocadopalme (German), avocatier (French), avokado (Swedish), e li (transcribed Chinese), palto (Spanish), wani-nashi (Japanese Rōmaji).

Native: NORTHERN AMERICA – Northern Mexico: Mexico – San Luis Potosi, Sinaloa, Sonora, Tamaulipas ; Southern Mexico: Mexico – Chiapas, Nayarit, Oaxaca, Puebla, Quintana Roo, Tabasco ; SOUTHERN AMERICA – Central America: Belize – Corozal ; Costa Rica – Alajuela, Puntarenas ; El Salvador – Chalatenango, Santa Ana ; Guatemala – Baja Verapaz, Chimaltenango, Huehuetenango, Jalapa, Quiche, Solola, Zacapa ; Honduras – Atlantida, Copan, El Paraiso, Francisco Morazan, Intibuca ; Nicaragua – Granada, Madriz, Matagalpa ; Northern South America : Venezuela – Amazonas .

Naturalized: PACIFIC – North-Central Pacific: United States – Hawaii; South-Central Pacific: French Polynesia; Pitcairn.

Cultivated: NORTHERN AMERICA – Northern Mexico: Mexico – Nuevo Leon; Southern Mexico: Mexico – Guerrero, Hidalgo, Jalisco, Mexico, Michoacan, Veracruz; SOUTHERN AMERICA – Central America: Belize; Costa Rica – Cartago, San Jose; El Salvador – San Salvador; Honduras – Olancho, Nicaragua – Chontales, Jinotega; Panama – Chiriqui, Panama; Northern South America: Venezuela; widely cultivated in Tropics and Subtropics.

Origin: Central America.

Field Infestation:

McBride and Tanada 1949:

Hawaii, U.S.A.

In 1946, B. cucurbitae (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ) was reared from P. americana by O.C. McBride: 5 B. cucurbitae adults emerged from 19 fruits that had ripened on the tree. The authors listed P. americana as a rarely injured plant.

Interception Data:

PestID 2016:

Hawaii, U.S.A.

Bactrocera cucurbitae was recovered by USDA-APHIS-PPQ (“interceptions”) from Persea americana fruits, originating in Hawaii, at airports in Hawaii (Honolulu-5; Kailua-Kona-3) on eight occasions between 1989 and 2004. Average recovery was 4.5 live larvae (range: 2 – 7).

USDA 1948a:

Bactrocera cucurbitae (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ) was recovered from avocado ( P. americana ) which originated in Hawaii and was intercepted at a port in California (1 interception in non-entry host) between 1 July 1945 and 30 June 1946 (number of individuals recovered and life stages not reported). Taxonomic identification was done by entomologists of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, USDA.

Lab Infestation:

Iwaizumi et al. 1994:

Intact, mature P. americana fruits were exposed to 10 gravid female B. cucurbitae for 24 hours in a screen-net cage. An average (over three replications) of 0.3±0.5 adults was recovered. Avocado fruits punctured several times with insect pins were similarly exposed to 10 gravid females, with an average recovery of 2.0±1.6 adult flies.

Listing Only: Botha et al. 2004 (listed as a secondary host); CABI 2016; California Department of Food and Agriculture 2001; Cantrell et al. 1999; Chawla 1966 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); Dhillon et al. 2005a; EcoPort 2008; Government of Western Australia Department of Agriculture and Food 2015; + Hawaii Department of Agriculture 2009 (listed as avocado); Holbrook 1967 (listed as “rarely infested”); Hollingsworth et al. 1996; Kapoor 1970 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); + Margosian et al. 2009 (listed as avocado); Nafus 1997 (infests P. americana in the Mariana Islands); Narayanan and Batra 1960 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); Oakley 1950 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); Plantwise Knowledge Bank 2015; Syed 1971 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); USDA 1986 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); USDA-APHIS 2000; USDA- APHIS 2008; USDA-APHIS-PPQ 1983 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); USDA-APHIS-PPQ-CSDA 1984 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; insufficient data to justify regulation); White and Elson-Harris 1992.

Synonyms: Laurus persea L., Persea americana var. floccose (Moz) Scora , nom. inval., Persea americana var. nubigena (L. O. Williams) L. E. Kopp , Persea americana var. steyermarkii (C. K. Allen) Scora , nom. inval., Persea americana var. tolimanensis (Zentmyer and Schieber) Scora , nom. inval., Persea americana var. zentmyer Scora , nom. inval., Persea floccose Mez , Persea gigantea L. O. Williams , Persea nubigena L. O. Williams , Persea persea (L.) Cockerell, Persea steyermarkii C. K. Allen , Persea tolimanensis Zentmyer and Schieber , nom. inval., Persea zentmyeri Schieber and B. Bergh , nom. inval.

Persea americana var. floccose (Moz) Scora , nom. inval., see Persea americana Mill.

Persea americana var. nubigena (L. O. Williams) L. E. Kopp , see Persea americana Mill.

Persea americana var. steyermarkii (C. K. Allen) Scora , nom. inval., see Persea americana Mill. Persea americana var. tolimanensis (Zentmyer and Schieber) Scora , nom. inval., see Persea americana Mill.

Persea americana var. zentmyer Scora , nom. inval., see Persea americana Mill.

Persea floccose Mez , see Persea americana Mill.

Persea gigantea L. O. Williams , see Persea americana Mill.

Persea nubigena L. O. Williams , see Persea americana Mill.

Persea persea (L.) Cockerell, see Persea americana Mill.

Persea sp.

Family: Lauraceae

Grin Nomen Number : 312431

Interception Data:

PestID 2016:

Hawaii, U.S.A.

Bactrocera cucurbitae was recovered by USDA-APHIS-PPQ (“interceptions”) from Persea sp. fruit(s), originating in Hawaii, at an airport in Hawaii (Honolulu) on one occasion in 2005. Recovery was nine live larvae.

Persea steyermarkii C. K. Allen , see Persea americana Mill.

Persea tolimanensis Zentmyer and Schieber , nom. inval., see Persea americana Mill.

Persea zentmyeri Schieber and B. Bergh , nom. inval., see Persea americana Mill

Persica vulgaris Mill. , see Prunus persica (L.) Batsch var. persica

Phaseolaceae Mart. , see Fabaceae Lindl. , nom. cons.

Phaseolus angustifolius Roxb. , nom. nud., see Phaseolus spp .

Phaseolus aureus Roxb. , see Vigna radiata (L.) R. Wilczek var. radiata

Phaseolus falcatus Benth. ex Hemsl. , see Phaseolus lunatus L.

Phaseolus hastatus Freytag and Debouck , nom. inval., see Phaseolus spp .

Phaseolus inamoenus L., see Phaseolus lunatus L.

Phaseolus limensis Macfad. , see Phaseolus lunatus L.

Phaseolus lunatus L.

Family: Fabaceae

Grin Nomen Number: 27591

Common Names: aoi-mame (Japanese Rōmaji), butter bean (English), chaedu (transcribed Korean), fagiolo di Lima (Italian), fava-Belém (Portuguese-Brazil), feijão-de-Lima (Portuguese), frijol de luna (Spanish), haba lima (Spanish), haricot de Lima (French), haricot du Cap (French), judía de Lima (Spanish), Lima bean (English), Limabohne (German), limaböna (Swedish), main dou (transcribed Chinese), Mondbohne (German), pallar (Spanish), pois du Cap (French), Sieva bean (English), sugar bean (English).

Native: NORTHERN AMERICA – Northern Mexico: Mexico – Baja Sur , Sinaloa, Tamaulipas ; Southern Mexico: Mexico – Campeche, Chiapas, Guerrero, Jalisco, Mexico, Michoacan, Morelos, Nayarit, Oaxaca, Tabasco, Veracruz, Yucatan ; SOUTHERN AMERICA – Central America: Belize – Cayo, Corozal , Stann Creek, Toledo ; Costa Rica – Guanacaste, Heredia ; El Salvador – Ahuachapan, La Libertad, San Miguel, San Salvador, San Vicente, Sonsonate ; Guatemala – Alta Verapaz, Chimaltenango, Chiquimula, El Progreso, Escuintla, Guatemala, Izabal, Jalapa, Peten, Quezaltenango , Retalhuleu, Sacatepequez, San Marcos, Santa Rosa, Solola, Suchitepequez, Zacapa ; Honduras – Atlantida, Colon, Comayagua, Cortes, El Paraiso, Francisco Morazan ; Nicaragua – Chinandega, Esteli, Granada, Jinotega, Managua, Zelaya ; Panama – Chiriqui, Herrera, Panama ; Northern South America : Venezuela ; Brazil: Brazil – Para ; Western South America : Bolivia – Cochabamba ; Colombia – Magdalena ; Ecuador – Azuay, Loja ; Peru – Cuzco [ Quillabamba ] ; Southern South America : Argentina – Chaco, Salta ; Paraguay.

Naturalized: Widely naturalized.

Cultivated: Widely cultivated.

Field Infestation:

McBride and Tanada 1949:

Waialae, Honolulu, Hawaii, U.S.A.

Twelve (12) P. lunatus pods (listed as P. limensis Macf. ) were collected in 1946 by Y. Tanada from Waialae, Honolulu. Fifty B. cucurbitae adults (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ) were recovered. The authors listed P. lunatus as occasionally injured.

Interception Data:

USDA 1948b:

Bactrocera cucurbitae (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ) was recovered from lima bean (listed as Phaseolus lunatus macrocarpus ) which originated from a port in Hawaii and was intercepted at a port in California (1 interception in non-entry host) between 1 July 1946 and 30 June 1947 (number of individuals recovered and life stages not reported). Taxonomic identification was done by entomologists of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, USDA.

Listing Only: California Department of Food and Agriculture 2001; Cantrell et al. 1999; Chawla 1966 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as Phaseolus limensis Macf. ); Dhillon et al. 2005a (listed as both Phaseolus limensis and as lime bean); Holbrook 1967 (listed both as Phaseolus limensis and as P. lunatus ; listed as “occasionally infested”); Kapoor 1970 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as Phaseolus limensis ); + Margosian et al. 2009 (listed as lima beans); Narayanan and Batra 1960 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as Phaseolus limensis ); Oakley 1950 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as Phaseolus lunatus macrocarpus ); Syed 1971 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as Phaseolus limensis ); USDA 1986 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); USDA-APHIS 2000; USDA-APHIS 2008; USDA-APHIS-PPQ 1983 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); USDA-APHIS-PPQ-CSDA 1984 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as a preferred host); White and Elson-Harris 1992 (authors state “requires confirmation”).

Synonyms: Phaseolus falcatus Benth. ex Hemsl. , Phaseolus inamoenus L., Phaseolus limensis Macfad. , Phaseolus lunatus var. lunatus , Phaseolus lunatus L. var. macrocarpus (Moench) Benth. , Phaseolus lunatus var. silvester Baudet , Phaseolus macrocarpus Moench , Phaseolus tunkinensis Lour. , Phaseolus viridis Piper

Phaseolus lunatus var. lunatus , see Phaseolus lunatus L.

Phaseolus lunatus L. var. macrocarpus (Moench) Benth. , see Phaseolus lunatus L.

Phaseolus lunatus var. silvester Baudet , see Phaseolus lunatus L.

Phaseolus macrocarpus Moench , see Phaseolus lunatus L.

Phaseolus mungo L., see Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper var. mungo

Phaseolus nanus L., see Phaseolus vulgaris L.

Phaseolus pulchellus Piper , see Vigna spp.

Phaseolus radiatus L., see Vigna radiata (L.) R. Wilczek var. radiata

Phaseolus rioverdensis Freytag and Debouck , nom. inval., see Phaseolus spp .

Phaseolus scaberulus Miq. , see Vigna spp.

Phaseolus sp.

Family: Fabaceae

Grin Nomen Number: 300451

Interception Data:

USDA 1939a:

Bactrocera cucurbitae was recovered from string bean ( Phaseolus sp. ) which originated from a port in Hawaii and was intercepted at a port in California (2 interceptions in stores) between 1 July 1936 and 30 June 1937 (number of individuals recovered and life stages not reported). Taxonomic identification was done by entomologists of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, USDA.

USDA 1942:

Bactrocera cucurbitae (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ) was recovered from string beans ( Phaseolus sp. ) which originated from a port in Hawaii and was intercepted at a port in California (1 interception in non-entry/quarters) between 1 July 1940 and 30 June 1941 (number of individuals recovered and life stages not reported). Taxonomic identification was done by entomologists of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, USDA.

USDA 1943:

Bactrocera cucurbitae (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ) was recovered from string bean ( Phaseolus sp. ) which originated from a port in Hawaii and was intercepted at a port in California (1 interception in non-entry) between 1 July 1941 and 30 June 1942 (number of individuals recovered and life stages not reported). Taxonomic identification was done by entomologists of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, USDA.

USDA 1945:

Bactrocera cucurbitae (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ) was recovered from string bean ( Phaseolus sp. ) which originated from a port in Hawaii and was intercepted at a port in California (1 interception in non-entry host) between 1 July 1943 and 30 June 1944 (number of individuals recovered and life stages not reported). Taxonomic identification was done by entomologists of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, USDA.

USDA 1946:

Bactrocera cucurbitae (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ) was recovered from string bean ( Phaseolus sp. ) which originated from a port in Hawaii and was intercepted at a port in California (1 interception in non-entry host) between 1 July 1944 and 30 June 1945 (number of individuals recovered and life stages not reported). Taxonomic identification was done by entomologists of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, USDA.

USDA 194 8a:

Bactrocera cucurbitae (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ) was recovered from string bean ( Phaseolus sp. ) which originated in Hawaii and was intercepted at a port in California (2 interceptions in non-entry hosts) between 1 July 1945 and 30 June 1946 (number of individuals recovered and life stages not reported). Taxonomic identification was done by entomologists of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, USDA.

USDA 1948b:

Bactrocera cucurbitae (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ) was recovered from string bean ( Phaseolus sp. ) which originated from a port in Hawaii and was intercepted at a port in California (4 interceptions in non-entry hosts) between 1 July 1946 and 30 June 1947 (number of individuals recovered and life stages not reported). Taxonomic identification was done by entomologists of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, USDA.

Lab Infestation:

Chawla 1966:

In captivity, female B. cucurbitae adults (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ) laid eggs on cut fruits of Phaseolus sp. The eggs hatched and the development of the larvae proceeded normally through adult emergence.

Phaseolus spp .

Family: Fabaceae

Grin Nomen Number: 300451

Interception Data:

USDA 1926:

Bactrocera cucurbitae (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ) was recovered from string bean ( Phaseolus spp .) which originated from a port in Hawaii and was intercepted at a port in California (five interceptions) between 1 January 1924 and 31 December 1925 (number of individuals recovered and life stages not reported). Taxonomic identification was done by entomologists of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, USDA.

USDA 1929:

Bactrocera cucurbitae was recovered from string beans ( Phaseolus spp .) which originated from a port in Hawaii and was intercepted at a port in California (3 interceptions in stores) between 1 January 1928 and 31 December 1928 (number of individuals recovered and life stages not reported). Host was recorded by state inspector of California. Taxonomic identification was done by entomologists of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, USDA.

Listing Only: + Australian Quarantine Service, Commonwealth Department of Primary Industry 1987 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as beans); + Christenson and Foote 1960 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as beans); EcoPort 2008; + Hawaii Department of Agriculture 2009 (listed as bean); + Hollingsworth et al. 1996 (listed as beans); + Lall 1975 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as beans); + Mau et al. 2007 (listed as beans); Nafus 1997 ( B. cucurbitae infests Phaseolus sp. in the Mariana Islands); + Queensland Government 2015 (listed as bean); + Tsatsia and Hollingsworth 1997 (listed as beans); USDA 1986 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); +USDA-ARS 1959 (listed as beans; listed as a preferred host).

Synonyms: Phaseolus angustifolius Roxb. , nom. nud., Phaseolus hastatus Freytag and Debouck , nom. inval., Phaseolus rioverdensis Freytag and Debouck , nom. inval.

Phaseolus tunkinensis Lour. , see Phaseolus lunatus L.

Phaseolus unguiculata (L.) Piper, see Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. subsp. unguiculata Unguiculata Group

Phaseolus viridis Piper , see Phaseolus lunatus L.

Phaseolus viridissimus Ten. ex Miq. , nom. inval., see Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper var. mungo

Phaseolus vulgaris L.

Family: Fabaceae

Grin Nomen Number: 27632

Common Names: bean (English), böna (Swedish), cai dou (transcribed Chinese), deonggulgangnamkong (transcribed Korean), fragiolo (Italian), gangnamkong (transcribed Korean), ingen-mame (Japanese Rōmaji), juldangkong (transcribed Korean).

Native: NORTHERN AMERICA – Northern Mexico: Mexico – Durango, Sinaloa, Tamaulipas ; Southern Mexico: Mexico – Chiapas, Guanajuato, Guerrero, Jalisco, Mexico, Michoacan, Morelos, Nayarit, Oaxaca, Puebla, Queretaro, Veracruz ; SOUTHERN AMERICA – Central America: Costa Rica – Alajuela, San Jose ; El Salvador – Ahuachapan ; Guatemala – Chimaltenango, Chiquimula, Guatemala, Jalapa, Sacatepequez, Santa Rosa, Solola ; Honduras – Francisco Morazan ; Nicaragua – Esteli, Jinotega ; Northern South America : Venezuela – Merida, Portuguesa, Tachira, Trujillo ; Western South America : Bolivia – Chuquisaca, Cochabamba, Tarija ; Colombia – Boyaca, Cundinamarca, Norte de Santander ; Ecuador – Azuay, Chimborazo, Loja ; Peru – Apurimac, Cajamarca, Cuzco, Piura ; Southern South America : Argentina – Catamarca, Jujuy, Salta, Santiago del Estero, Tucuman .

Naturalized: Naturalized worldwide. Uncertain: SOUTHERN AMERICA – Northern South America: Venezuela – Lara. Cultivated: Cultivated worldwide. Field Infestation:

Allwood et al. 1999:

Thailand, Malaysia, Southern India

From fruit collections in 1992, B. cucurbitae was recovered from 16 samples of P. vulgaris . Infestation rate data were not given. Bactrocera cucurbitae individuals were identified by R.A.I. Drew and D.L. Hancock.

+ Back and Pemberton 1917:

Hawaii, U.S.A.

Phaseolus vulgaris (listed as string beans) was listed as a preferred host of B. cucurbitae ,

but it was noted that “only seldom are any of the varieties affected except the more fleshy, long-podded Chinese variety,” which may be heavily attacked if grown near other favored host fruits. It was noted that as many as 36 well-grown melon fly larvae have been recovered in a single pod. An illustration of melon fly larvae in a green bean pod was provided.

+ Back and Pemberton 1918:

Hawaii, U.S.A.

Phaseolus vulgaris (listed as string beans) was listed as a preferred host of B. cucurbitae ,

but it was noted that “only seldom are any of the varieties affected except the more fleshy, long-podded Chinese variety,” which may be heavily attacked if grown near other favored host fruits. It was noted that as many as 36 well-grown melon fly larvae have been recovered in a single pod. An illustration of melon fly larvae in a green bean pod was provided.

+ Froggatt 1909:

Island of Oahu, Hawaii, U.S.A.

In the vegetable gardens on the slopes of Mount Tantillus, on the Island of Oahu, Hawaii, the author found fruit fly maggots in many ripening P. vulgaris beans (listed as string beans; the maggots were not specifically identified as B. cucurbitae , but the article focused on B. cucurbitae and B. dorsalis was not yet present in Hawaii; it was also not explicitly stated that adult fruit flies were recovered). No infestation rate data were given.

+ Holdaway 1940:

Koko Head, Island of Oahu, Hawaii, U.S.A.

On 1, 3 and 5 July 1938, three varieties (‘ Kentucky Wonder,’ ‘Lualualei,’ and ‘McCaslan’)

of P. vulgaris pods (listed as bush, garden, pole or string beans) were picked from two 30-meter-long rows (for each variety) and the number of pods were counted that showed signs of oviposition by B. cucurbitae (listed as Dacus cucurbitae Coq. ). Overall percentage of pods having oviposition damage was 1.1% (out of 1,950 pods [14.5 kg]), 8.6% (out of 5,765 pods [43.3 kg]), and 5.9% (out of 1,590 pods [12.0 kg]) for the three varieties, respectively. The author also reported that a grower found beans of the variety ‘Tendergreen’ to be more heavily attacked by B. cucurbitae than the three varieties listed above, but no data were provided for this variety.

Nohara and Ichinohe 1980:

Japan

During 1972 to 1976, collections of 17,934 P. vulgaris pods (114 kg) (varieties ‘ Kentucky wonder’ and ‘Ohirasaya-shakugosun’) were made on farms on Okinawa Island, Miyako Island, and Ishigaki Island. No B. cucurbitae eggs or larvae (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ) were recovered. During December 1977 to April 1978, in a follow-up survey of these farms, 17 P. vulgaris pods (of the two varieties listed above + ‘Shin-edogawa’) were found to be infested by B. cucurbitae out of 150,873 pods (1,063 kg) collected (0.0113%). Two (2) of the 17 infested P. vulgaris pods were from a lot of 118,271 pods (860 kg) of standard grade pods harvested for interprefectural shipment, while the remaining 15 pods were from 24,704 pods left over residue (144 kg). There was no infestation in the remaining 7,898 pods (58.5 kg) held for within prefecture consumption. In an associated experiement, when 200:1,000 male:gravid female B. cucurbitae flies were released inside a screen-enclosed field of stringbeans, 0.93% of the pods were infested. When 5, 10, 100, and 1,000 male/gravid female pairs were released inside screened enclosures, 3.6, 2.7, 9.7, and 39.5% of stringbean pods were infested. The authors concluded that stringbean pods grown under normal field conditions can be infested by B. cucurbitae if the B. cucurbitae population is high and other more susceptible hosts are not present. Otherwise, infestation of stringbean pods will be “seldom and incidental.” + Severin et al. 1914: Hawaii, U.S.A.

Twelve (12) infested, green-podded Phaseolus vulgaris beans (listed as string beans)

were collected from the field and held in the laboratory. One hundred sixty-five (165) B. cucurbitae adults (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ) were recovered for an average of 13.75 flies per pod (range: 4–26). + Swezey et al. 1906: Hawaii, U.S.A.

At a meeting of the Hawaiian Entomological Society in Honolulu, Hawaii, Mr. Swezey exhibited specimens of B. cucurbitae (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ) that he had recovered from P. vulgaris (listed as string beans). Interception Data: PestID 2016: Hawaii, U.S.A.

Bactrocera cucurbitae was recovered by USDA-APHIS-PPQ (“interceptions”) from

Phaseolus vulgaris fruits, originating in Hawaii, at an airport in Hawaii (Honolulu) on three occasions from 1993 to 2009. Average recovery was 8.7 live larvae (range: 5–12). Takeishi 1992: Thailand

One B. cucurbitae -infested (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ) P. vulgaris pod was collected from an airline passenger at Narita Airport, Japan, who had arrived on a flight originating in Thailand. At the time of confiscation, the larvae-infested pod was held in an individual container with sand at 20–28°C until adult emergence. Infestation rate data were not given. USDA 1943: Bactrocera cucurbitae (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ) was recovered from kidney bean

( P. vulgaris L.) which originated from a port in Hawaii and was intercepted at a port in California (1 interception in non-entry host) between 1 July 1941 and 30 June 1942 (number of individuals recovered and life stages not reported). Taxonomic identification was done by entomologists of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, USDA. USDA 1950: Bactrocera cucurbitae (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ) was recovered from string bean ( P.

vulgaris variety) which originated from a port in Hawaii and was intercepted at a port in California (5 interceptions in non-entry hosts) between 1 July 1947 and 30 June 1948 (number of individuals recovered and life stages not reported). Taxonomic identification was done by entomologists of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, USDA. USDA 1951: Bactrocera cucurbitae (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ?) was recovered from string bean ( P.

vulgaris variety) which originated from a port in Hawaii and was intercepted at a port in California (1 interception in non-entry host) between 1 July 1948 and 30 June 1949 (number of individuals recovered and life stages not reported). Taxonomic identification was done by entomologists of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, USDA. USDA 1953: Bactrocera cucurbitae (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ) was recovered from string bean

( Phaseolus vulgaris variety) which originated from a port in Hawaii and was intercepted at a port in California (1 interception in consumption host) between 1 July 1951 and 30 June 1952 (number of individuals recovered and life stages not reported). Taxonomic identification was done by entomologists of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, USDA. USDA 1955: Bactrocera cucurbitae (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ) was recovered from string bean ( P.

vulgaris variety) which originated in Hawaii and was intercepted at a port in Hawaii (3 interceptions in consumption hosts) between 1 July 1952 and 30 June 1953 (number of individuals recovered and life stages not reported). Taxonomic identification was done by entomologists of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, USDA.

USDA 1959:

Bactrocera cucurbitae (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ) was recovered from string bean ( P. vulgaris variety) which originated in Hawaii and was intercepted at a port in California (1 interception in non-entry host) between 1 July 1957 and 30 June 1958 (number of individuals recovered and life stages not reported). Taxonomic identification was done by entomologists of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, USDA.

Lab Infestation:

Chawla 1966:

In captivity, female B. cucurbitae adults (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ) laid eggs on cut fruits of French beans ( P. vulgaris ). The eggs hatched and the development of the larvae proceeded normally through adult emergence.

Listing Only: + Back and Pemberton 1914 (listed as string beans); Botha et al. 2004 (listed as a secondary host); CABI 2016 (listed as a secondary host); Cantrell et al. 1999; De Meyer et al. 2014; Dhillon et al. 2005a; Hardy and Adachi 1956 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); + Heppner 1989 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as string bean); Holbrook 1967 (listed as “occasionally infested”); Holdaway and Look 1942 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as beans); Hollingsworth et al. 1996; Hollingsworth and Allwood 2000; Kandybina 1987 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); Kapoor 1970 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); + Margosian et al. 2009 (listed as garden beans); + Mau et al. 2007 (listed as green beans); McBride and Tanada 1949 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as occasionally injured); + Messing et al. 1995 (listed as green beans); +NAPPO, PAS 2015 (listed as string bean); Narayanan and Batra 1960 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); +Nishida 1953 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as beans); + Nishida and Bess 1957 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as beans); Oakley 1950 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); + Okinawa Prefectural Fruit Fly Eradication Project 1987 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as string bean); Pacific Fruit Fly Web 2002; Phillips 1946; Plantwise Knowledge Bank 2015; + Rajamannar 1962 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as string bean); + Ramadan and Messing 2003 (listed as string beans); Singh et al. 2004; Syed 1971 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); + Van Dine 1906 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as pods of string beans); USDA 1986 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); USDA-APHIS-PPQ 1983 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); USDA-APHIS-PPQ-CSDA 1984 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as a preferred host); Walker 2005; +Weems 1964 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as string bean; listed as a preferred host); +Weems 1967 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as string bean; listed as a preferred host); +Weems et al. 2001 (listed as string bean; listed as a preferred host); White and Elson-Harris 1992.

Synonyms: Phaseolus nanus L., Phaseolus vulgaris var. mexicanus Freytag , nom. inval.

Phaseolus vulgaris var. mexicanus Freytag , nom. inval., see Phaseolus vulgaris L.

Phoenix dactylifera L.

Family: Arecaceae

Grin Nomen Number: 28046

Common Names: dadenpalm (Swedish), date (English), date palm (English), Dattelpalme (German), dattier (French), nakhl (Arabic), palmera datilera (Spanish), palmier dattier (French), tamareira (Portuguese).

Cultivated: Only cultivated.

Origin: ASIA-TEMPERATE – Arabian Peninsula : Oman.

Listing Only: + Agrawal and Mathur 1991 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as date); + Batra 1953 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as date palm); California Department of Food and Agriculture 2001; Cantrell et al. 1999; Chawla 1966 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); Dhillon et al. 2005a; + Gopalan et al. 1977 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as date palm); Holbrook 1967 (listed as a “non-host or host of undetermined status”); Kapoor 1970 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); + Kapoor 1989 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as date); Kapoor 1991 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); Kapoor and Agarwal 1983 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); + Lall 1964 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as date and datepalm); + Lall 1975 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; listed as date palm); + Margosian et al. 2009 (listed as date palm); McBride and Tanada 1949 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); Narayanan and Batra 1960 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae );

Oakley 1950 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); Singh et al. 2004; Syed 1971 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); USDA 1986 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); USDA-APHIS 2000; USDA-APHIS 2008; USDA-APHIS-PPQ 1983 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ); USDA-APHIS-PPQ-CSDA 1984 (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ; insufficient data to justify regulation); White and Elson-Harris 1992 (authors state “requires confirmation”).

Phoenix spp. Family: Arecaceae Grin Nomen Number : 312436 Interception Data:

PestID 2016:

Morocco

Bactrocera cucurbitae was recovered by USDA-APHIS-PPQ (“interceptions”) from Phoenix sp. fruit(s), originating in Morocco, at an airport in New York (JFK) on one occasion in 1998. Recovery was three live pupae.

Nigeria

Bactrocera cucurbitae was recovered by USDA-APHIS-PPQ (“interceptions”) from Phoenix sp. fruit(s), originating in Nigeria, at an airport in Georgia (Atlanta) on one occasion in 2005. Recovery was one live larva.

Physalis aequata J. Jacq. ex Nees , see Physalis philadelphica Lam.

Physalis ixocarpa auct., see Physalis philadelphica Lam.

Physalis philadelphica Lam.

Family: Solanaceae

Grin Nomen Number: 102411

Common Names: alkékenge du Mexique (French), coqueret (French), husk-tomato (English), large-flowered tomatillo (English), mexikanische Blasenkirsche (German), miltomate (Spanish), tomate (Spanish), tomate de cáscara (Spanish), tomate fraise (French), tomate verde (Spanish), tomatillo (Spanish), tomatillo (Swedish), tomatillo ground-cherry (English).

Native: NORTHERN AMERICA – Mexico; SOUTHERN AMERICA – Central America: El Salvador, Guatemala.

Naturalized: Widely naturalized.

Cultivated: Widely cultivated.

Field Infestation:

Liquido et al. 1994:

Hawaii Island, Hawaii, U.S.A.

From July 1990 to October 1992, 56 ripe “on shrub” or ground P. philadelphica fruits (0.89 kg) (listed as Physalis ixocarpa Brot. ) were collected (through collections made once or twice a month) from several sites on Hawaii Island, Hawaii. Fruits were weighed, counted, split into groups of 5 or 10 and held over sand in plastic buckets at 19–24°C until pupation (2 weeks). Bactrocera cucurbitae larvae and pupae were recovered from infested P. philadelphica fruits with an overall infestation rate of 0.68 larvae and pupae per fruit (42.70 larvae and pupae/kg fruit).

Synonyms: Physalis aequata J. Jacq. ex Nees , Physalis ixocarpa auct.

Phytolacca javanica Osbeck , see Terminalia catappa L.

Pisosperma Sond. , see Kedrostis Medik.

Pisum sativum L.

Family: Fabaceae

Grin Nomen Number: 300472

Common Names: ärt (Swedish), pea (English), pisello (Italian), wan dou (transcribed Chinese), wandu (transcribed Korean).

Native: AFRICA – Northern Africa: Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Tunisia; Northeast Tropical Africa: Ethiopia; ASIA-TEMPERATE – Western Asia: Cyprus, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Lebanon, Syria, Turkey; Caucasus: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Russian Federation – Ciscaucasia; EUROPE – East Europe: Moldova, Ukraine, Krym; Southeastern Europe: Albania, Bulgaria, Former Yugoslavia, Greece, Crete, Italy, Sardinia, Sicily, Romania; Southwestern Europe: France, Corsica, Portugal, Spain.

Cultivated: Cultivated worldwide.

Lab Infestation:

Chawla 1966:

In captivity, female B. cucurbitae adults (listed as Dacus cucurbitae ) laid eggs on cut fruits of sweet pea ( P. sativum ). The eggs hatched and the development of the larvae proceeded normally through adult emergence.

Synonyms: Pisum sativum L. subsp. tibetanicum ined.

Pisum sativum L. subsp. tibetanicum ined., see Pisum sativum L.

Podophyllum sp.

Family: Berberidaceae

Grin Nomen Number : 454415

Interception Data:

Defra 2008:

India

Bactrocera cucurbitae was recovered in North West United Kingdom from six boxes of Podophyllum sp. originating in India. No infestation rate data were given.

Poinsettia heterophylla (L.) Klotzsch and Garcke, see Euphorbia heterophylla L.

Posadaea sphaerocarpa Cogn. see Melothria sphaerocarpa (Cogn.) , H. Schaef. and S.S. Renner

Potentilla ×ananassa (Duchesne ex Rozier) Mabb., see Fragaria × ananassa Duchesne ex Rozier

Pouteria campechiana (Kunth) Baehni

Family: Sapotaceae

Grin Nomen Number : 102607

Common Names: canistel (English), canistelsapote (Swedish), eggfruit-tree (English), yellow sapote (English).

Native: NORTHERN AMERICA – Mexico; SOUTHERN AMERICA – Central America: Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama.

Interception Data:

PestID 2016:

Nigeria

Bactrocera cucurbitae was recovered by USDA-APHIS-PPQ (“interceptions”) from Pouteria campechiana fruit(s), originating in Nigeria, at an airport in Illinois (Chicago) on one occasion in 2008. Recovery was five live larvae.

Synonym: Lucuma campechiana Kunth , Lucuma nervosa A. DC. , Lucuma rivicoa C. F. Gaertn. var. angustifolia Miq. , Lucuma salicifolia Kunth , Richardella nervosa (A DC.) Pierre , Richardella salicifolia (Kunth) Pierre

Pouteria mammosa auct., see Pouteria sapota (Jacq.) H.E. Moore and Stearn

Pouteria mammosa Cronquist , see Manilkara zapota (L.) P. Royen

Pouteria sapota (Jacq.) H.E. Moore and Stearn

Family: Sapotaceae

Grin Nomen Number : 1303

Common Names: grosse Sapote (German), mamey (Spanish), mamey colorado (Spanish), mameysapote (Swedish), mammee sapote (English), marmalade-plum (English), marmalade-tree (English), sapote (Spanish), zapote (Spanish), zapote mamey (Spanish).

Native: NORTHERN AMERICA – Mexico; SOUTHERN AMERICA – Central America: Belize, El Salvador – San Vicente; Guatemale, Honduras, Nicaragua.

Cultivated: Widely cultivated in tropics.

Interception Data:

PestID 2016:

Mali

Bactrocera cucurbitae was recovered by USDA-APHIS-PPQ (“interceptions”) from Pouteria sapota fruit(s), originating in Mali, at an airport in Texas (Houston) on one occasion in 2014. Recovery was 31 live larvae.

Nigeria

Bactrocera cucurbitae was recovered by USDA-APHIS-PPQ (“interceptions”) from Pouteria sapota fruits, originating in Nigeria, at airports in Texas (Houston-4) and New York (JFK-1) on five occasions from 1999 to 2014. Recovery averaged 4.4 live larvae (range: 1–11).

Synonym: Achras lucuma Blanco , Achras mammosa auct. , Calocarpum mammosum auct., Calocarpum sapota (Jacq.) Merr. , Lucuma mammosa auct., Pouteria mammosa auct., Sideroxylon sapota Jacq.

Pouteria sp.

Family: Sapotaceae

Grin Nomen Number : 312443

Interception Data:

PestID 2016:

Nigeria

Bactrocera cucurbitae was recovered by USDA-APHIS-PPQ (“interceptions”) from Pouteria sp. fruits, originating in Nigeria, at airports in Georgia (Atlanta–2); Illinois (Chicago–1); and Texas (Houston–3) on six occasions from 2003–2012. Average recovery was 6.2 live larvae (range: 1–20).

Synonyms: Lucuma spp.