Myrsidea neocinereae Price, Hellenthal and Dalgleish

Price, Roger D., Hellenthal, Ronald A. & Dalgleish, Robert C., 2005, The genus Myrsidea Waterston (Phthiraptera: Menoponidae) from tyrant­flycatchers (Passeriformes: Tyrannidae), with descriptions of 13 new species, Zootaxa 1048, pp. 1-20: 14-15

publication ID

http://doi.org/ 10.5281/zenodo.169922

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:1D5E264F-05A8-42C1-ABF0-425108BD2334

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/213887BA-FFD9-FF82-525F-FA8F9DDA311E

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Myrsidea neocinereae Price, Hellenthal and Dalgleish
status

new species

Myrsidea neocinereae Price, Hellenthal and Dalgleish  , new species ( Fig. 17View FIGURES 9 – 17. 9 – 10)

Type host. Serpophaga cinerea (Tschudi)  , Torrent Tyrannulet.

Female. Dorsal thorax and dorsoventral abdomen as in Fig. 17View FIGURES 9 – 17. 9 – 10. Metanotum with 18 marginal setae. Tergite I much enlarged, tapering to medioposterior blunt process; tergites II –V medially compressed and narrowed. Tergal setae: I, 18; II –III, 21–22; IV –V, 25–26; VI, 19; VII, 11; VIII, 8. Postspiracular setae on V –VII short, intermediate on III, and long to very long on other segments. Sternal setae: II, each aster with 4 setae, 27 other setae; III, 17; IV –V, 23–25; VI, 18; VII, 11; VIII –IX of subgenital plate, 26. Anus with 35–37 setae in each fringe. Dimensions: TW, 0.45; HL & PW, 0.30; PSL, 0.12; MW, 0.51; MSL, 0.19; AWIV, 0.59; ANW, 0.21; TL, 1.53.

Male. Metanotum with 10 marginal setae. Tergal setae: I, 12; II –V, 15–17; VI, 11; VII, 9; VIII, 8. Sternal setae: II, each aster with 4 setae, 30 other setae; III, 17; IV –V, 22– 23; VI, 18; VII, 13; VIII, 8. Genital sac sclerite obscured. Dimensions: TW, 0.41; HL, 0.28; PW, 0.27; PSL, 0.11; MW, 0.36; MSL, 0.14; AWIV, 0.43; GL, 0.40; TL, 1.20.

Type material. Holotype female ( TNHM), ex S. cinerea  , BOLIVIA: Prov. Chiquitos, Dto. Santa Cruz, Brit. Mus. 1961 ­ 489. Paratype ( TNHM), 1 male, same data as holotype.

Remarks. Though this new species is based on a single pair, the female, with its highly distinctive development of the anterior abdominal tergites and the large number of tergal setae, is easily separated from all other species of this group. A few quantitative features appear to support male separation, but there is need for additional material.

TNHM

University of Texas