Myrsidea seversoni Price, Hellenthal and Dalgleish

Price, Roger D., Hellenthal, Ronald A. & Dalgleish, Robert C., 2005, The genus Myrsidea Waterston (Phthiraptera: Menoponidae) from tyrant­flycatchers (Passeriformes: Tyrannidae), with descriptions of 13 new species, Zootaxa 1048, pp. 1-20: 7

publication ID

http://doi.org/ 10.5281/zenodo.169922

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:1D5E264F-05A8-42C1-ABF0-425108BD2334

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/213887BA-FFD2-FF8A-525F-FBB79B003449

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Myrsidea seversoni Price, Hellenthal and Dalgleish
status

new species

Myrsidea seversoni Price, Hellenthal and Dalgleish  , new species ( Fig. 7View FIGURES 1 – 8. 1 – 2)

Type host. Tyrannus verticalis Say  , Western Kingbird.

Female. Dorsal thorax and abdomen as in Fig. 7View FIGURES 1 – 8. 1 – 2. Metanotum with 10, much less often 9 or 11, marginal setae. Tergites II –IV with slight medioposterior convexity. Tergal setae: I, 10–12; II –V, 14–20; VI, 15–17; VII, 9–13; VIII, 8, rarely 9. Postspiracular setae very long and of similar length on I –VIII. Sternal setae: II, each aster with 4–5 setae, 22– 32 other setae; III, 22–27; IV, 51–60; V, 56–68; VI, 43–49; VII, 15–20; VIII –IX of subgenital plate, 23–29. Anus with 35–42 setae in each fringe. Dimensions: TW, 0.54–0.56; HL, 0.36–0.39; PW, 0.33–0.35; PSL, 0.13–0.14; MW, 0.51–0.53; MSL, 0.16–0.18; AWIV, 0.67–0.72; ANW, 0.24–0.26; TL, 1.78–1.87.

Male. Unavailable.

Type material. Holotype female ( OSU), ex T. verticalis, Stillwater  , Oklahoma, U.S.A., 5 Jun 1948, K. C. Emerson. Paratypes ( OSU, TNHM): 19 females, same data as holotype.

Remarks. Though we have only females available for this description, the uniformly very long postspiracular setae on I –VIII, in combination with the number of tergal and sternal setae and the large dimensions, readily separate Myrsidea seversoni  from others of this species group.

Etymology. This species is named for David W. Severson, University of Notre Dame, in recognition of his many contributions to our understanding of the role of mosquitoes in disease transmission.

OSU

Ohio State University

TNHM

University of Texas