Akodon boliviensis, Meyen, 1833

Don E. Wilson, Russell A. Mittermeier & Thomas E. Lacher, Jr, 2017, Cricetidae, Handbook of the Mammals of the World – Volume 7 Rodents II, Barcelona: Lynx Edicions, pp. 204-535 : 476

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.6707142

DOI

https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.6727444

persistent identifier

https://treatment.plazi.org/id/03F06D13-FF6B-20A2-0D42-18640F83FAAB

treatment provided by

Carolina

scientific name

Akodon boliviensis
status

 

565. View Plate 26: Cricetidae

Bolivian Grass Mouse

Akodon boliviensis

French: Akodon de Bolivie / German: Bolivien-Graslandmaus / Spanish: Raton campestre de Bolivia

Other common names: Bolivian Akodont

Taxonomy. Akodon boliviense [sic] Meyen, 1833 , Pichu-Pichun, 14,000 ft., Puno, Peru.

Akodon boliviensis is the type species of the genus. Monotypic.

Distribution. SE Peru through C Bolivia to NW Argentina. View Figure

Descriptive notes. Head-body 90 mm, tail 65 mm, ear 14 mm, hindfoot 22 mm; weight 23 g. Dorsum of the Bolivian Grass Mouse is pale, uniformly brown, tinged olivaceous across back and crown, and lightly streaked with black. Venter is paler but with dark inguinal area. Flanks are similar to dorsum, yellowish eye-ring is present, white fur often occurs at apex of chin, and tail is sharply bicolored and haired.

Habitat. Drier environments of Puna , grassland, shrubland, Polylepis ( Rosaceae ) woodlands fragments in transition between uppermost Yungas and high Andean grasslands, disturbed habitats, and cultivated areas at elevations of 3700—c.5000 m.

Food and Feeding. The Bolivian Grass Mouse mostly eats arthropods but also green plants (dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous leaves) and seeds.

Breeding. Pregnant Bolivian Grass Mice were captured in January—September, with a mean of 4-5 embryos each (range 1-7). Shedding individuals were recorded in winter (July-August), and some specimens caught in spring (November) were shedding and reproductively active. Males with scrotal testes were trapped in October—March; all captured males had abdominal testes in July-August. Sexual maturity was reached at average weight of c.21 g for males and 23 g for females.

Activity patterns. The Bolivian Grass Mouse is terrestrial.

Movements, Home range and Social organization. The Bolivian Grass Mouse lives in burrow systems with openings at bases of shrubs and nesting chambers carpeted by finely chopped straw.

Status and Conservation. Classified as Least Concern on The IUCN Red Lust.

Bibliography. Alvarez (2016), Anderson (1997), Bernal, Dunnum, Jayat et al. (2016), Dorst (1971, 1973a, 1973b), Gébmez (1996), Jayat et al. (2010), Myers et al. (1990), Pardinas, Teta, Alvarado-Serrano et al. (2015), Salazar-Bravo, Yensen et al. (2002), Tarifa et al. (2007).

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Chordata

Class

Mammalia

Order

Rodentia

Family

Cricetidae

Genus

Akodon

Loc

Akodon boliviensis

Don E. Wilson, Russell A. Mittermeier & Thomas E. Lacher, Jr 2017
2017
Loc

Akodon boliviense [sic]

Meyen 1833
1833
Loc

Akodon boliviensis

Meyen 1833
1833