Alloperla nanina Banks, 1911

Grubbs, Scott A. & Baumann, Richard W., 2019, Alloperla clarki sp. nov. (Plecoptera: Chloroperlidae), a new species from the eastern Nearctic with discussion of a new species group, Zootaxa 4624 (2), pp. 241-255: 245-247

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4624.2.7

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:90BF05DF-3EC4-4E77-A1DC-EBDF6EC4C83A

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03C587D9-BC73-E471-CFB1-836B80F3FE78

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Alloperla nanina Banks, 1911
status

 

Alloperla nanina Banks, 1911 

Swannanoa Sallfly

http://lsid.speciesfile.org/urn:lsid: Plecoptera  .speciesfile.org:TaxonName:3622

( Figs. 13–22View FIGURES 13–18View FIGURES 19–22 & 39View FIGURE 39–40)

Alloperla nanina Banks, 1911:336  . Lectotype male (MCZ), North Fork Swannanoa River , Black Mountain, [Buncombe Co.],

North Carolina (Syntype male examined, MCZ 681817) Alloperla nanina: Needham & Claassen, 1925:126  Alloperla lodgei Frison 1935:340  . Holotype male (INHS), Fighting Creek, Gatlinburg, [Sevier Co.], Tennessee. Synonym

Frison, 1942:34 Alloperla nanina: Frison 1935:341  Alloperla nanina: Frison 1942:344  Sweltsa nanina: Illies 1996:454  Alloperla nanina: Hitchcock 1974:182  Alloperla nanina: Nelson & Kondratieff 1980:803  Alloperla nanina: Stark et al. 1998:76  Alloperla nanina: Surdick 2004:18  Alloperla nanina: Willett & Stark 2009:123 

Distribution. USA: GA, NC, TN, VA ( DeWalt et al. 2018), SC ( Kondratieff et al. 1995, Surdick 2004)

Material examined. USA, Georgia, Gilmer Co., Conasauga Creek , 16 km NW Elijay, Chattahoochee National Forest, 34.79495, -84.60325, 11 June 2016, S.A. Grubbs, 1 female ( WKUC)GoogleMaps  ; Murray Co., tributary to Holly Creek , Chattahoochee National Forest, 34.81990, -84.59228, 11 June 2016, S.A. Grubbs, 2 females ( WKUC)GoogleMaps  . North Carolina , Graham Co., seep into Panther Creek , Panther Creek Rd. off Rt. 28, 26 May 1993, 1 male, C.H. Nelson, B.C. Kondratieff & R.F. Kirchner ( CHNC)  ; Haywood Co., Flat Laurel Creek , ALS-63-14, 35.32434, -82.89611, 23 May 2014, A.L. Sheldon, 1 male ( WKUC)GoogleMaps  ; Haywood Gap Stream , Trail 142, ALS-67-14, 35.32797, -82.94373, 24 May 2014, A.L. Sheldon, 1 male ( WKUC)GoogleMaps  ; tributary to Flat Laurel Creek , TR 617, Pisgah National Forest, ALS-35-15, 35.32303, -82.89282, 22 July 2015, A.L. Sheldon, 1 female ( WKUC)GoogleMaps  ; Macon Co., tributary to Cullasaja River , U.S. 64/ Rte. 28, 13 km SE Franklin , Nantahala National Forest, 35.08001, -83.25452, 12 May 2000, S.A. Grubbs, 1 male ( WKUC)GoogleMaps  ; Wallace Branch , Cartoogechaye Creek, 4 km W Franklin, Nantahala National Forest, 35.18075, -83.43392, 13 May 2000, S.A. Grubbs, 2 males, 3 females ( WKUC)GoogleMaps  ; Wine Spring Creek , nr. FS 711F, ALS-80-14, 35.17912, -83.59789, 28 May 2014, A.L. Sheldon, 1 male, 1 female ( WKUC)GoogleMaps  ; Macon Co., Robin Branch , Wayah Bald, 13 June 1996, B.P. Stark, 1 male ( BPSC)  ; Robin Branch , Wayah Bald, 9 June 1998, J. Wise, J. Carter, J. Beaty & D. Beaty, 1 male ( BPSC)  ; Watauga / Caldwell Co. line, Hwy 221, 25 May 1994, B.P. Stark, S.W. Szczytko & J. Sandberg, 1 male ( BPSC)  ; Swain Co., small sinking stream, US 441 at parking lot, near Newfound Gap , Great Smoky Mountains National Park, 35.60775, -83.43703, 1 June 2015, S.A. Grubbs, 1 male ( WKUC)GoogleMaps  ; Yancey Co., Hemphill Creek, FS 472, ALS-50-14, 35.71024, -82.25057, 20 May 2014, A.L. Sheldon, 1 male ( WKUC)GoogleMaps  . South Carolina , Pickens Co., Wildcat Creek, 5.5 mi NW of Clemson, 24 April 1968, P.H. Carlson, 1 male, 1 female ( BPSC)  ; Wildcat Creek , 9 km NW Clemson, 6 May 1976, P.H. Carlson, 1 female ( BPSC)  ; Wildcat Creek , 14 May 1976, P.H. Carlson, 1 female ( BPSC)  ; Wildcat Creek , 9 km NW Clemson, 5-6 May 1979, T.R. White, 1 male, 2 females ( BPSC)  . Tennessee , Polk Co., Rock Creek , Parksville Lake Campground , Rt 30, 0.5 mi N Jct 30/64, Cherokee National Forest, 13 May 1985, C.H. Nelson, 5 males, 3 females ( CHNC)  . Virginia , Smyth Co., Saint Claire Bottom , Route 600, 19 May 1990, B.C. Kondratieff & R.F. Kirchner, 3 males ( CSUCAbout CSUC)  ; Grindstone Campground , Mt. Rogers National Recreational Area, 24 May 1994, B.P. Stark, S.W. Szczytko & J. Sandberg, 1 male ( BPSC)  .

Amended description – Male. Tergum 10 divided mesally by epiproct and reduced cowl into two hemitergal lobes; lobes bearing dense matting of long setae ( Figs. 13–15View FIGURES 13–18). Epiproct length (L) 125 µm, maximum width ( MW) 40 µm, L:MW ratio = 3.2. In dorsal view the epiproct is widest in basal ⅓, tapering anteriorly and distally. The entire dorsal surface is bare ( Figs. 14–17View FIGURES 13–18). The apical notch is narrowly triangular and extends anteriorly and ventrally as a groove between paired, serrated apical margins ( Figs. 15–18View FIGURES 13–18); 10 distinct teeth are present ( Figs. 17View FIGURES 13–18, 21–22View FIGURES 19–22); the serrated apex is arcuate ventrally ( Figs. 19–22View FIGURES 19–22). The epiproct stem is secondarily reduced and nearly absent; the serrated portion comprises the entire lateral profile ( Figs. 19–22View FIGURES 19–22). Dense hair matting is also absent laterally; a sparse group of long hairs are present in medial ⅓ ( Figs. 20–22View FIGURES 19–22).

The adults of A. nanina  are unusual amongst eastern Nearctic Alloperla  species in that the pronotum has a charcoal gray pigmentation within the medial 75% of the segment (the entire margin is pale yellow in color), the mesonotal and metanotal scutellar margins are darkly pigmented, and the abdomen has darkened medial and lateral stripes ( Surdick 2004, Grubbs & Singai 2018, their fig. 15).

Comments. The taxonomic histories of A. banksi Frison, 1942  and A. nanina  are intertwined. As was customary at the time, the original Banks (1911) description lacked illustrations. He indicated that individuals were small, the pronotum was darkly pigmented, plus this species was then only known from the type locality in western North Carolina. Although Needham & Claassen (1925) attempted to provide the first illustrations of the male of A. nanina  (their plate 20, fig. 3), this unintentionally represented an undescribed species. They noted variability at the tip of the epiproct, namely as “…sharply-pointed and smooth…” or “…bilobed…” and added that this did not justify differentiation into separate species. Several additional locality records were also added from New York and Nova Scotia. Soon thereafter, Frison (1935) mistakenly described A. lodgei  as new from Gatlinburg, Tennessee, providing several illustrations, especially his plates XIII (his fig. 25) and XIV (his fig. 36) that now are easily recognized as A. nanina  . Frison (1942) recognized the Needham & Claassen (1925) mistake, described A. banksi  from New York, and synonymized A. lodgei  under A. nanina  . Surdick (2004) has likewise provided a brief taxonomic history. The New York listing in DeWalt et al. (2018) now pertains to A. banksi  . Alloperla nanina  appears to be a species endemic mainly to the southern Appalachian Highlands region ( Fig. 39View FIGURE 39–40).

CSUC

California State University, Chico, Vertebrate Museum

MW

Museum Wasmann

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Insecta

Order

Plecoptera

Family

Chloroperlidae

Genus

Alloperla

Loc

Alloperla nanina Banks, 1911

Grubbs, Scott A. & Baumann, Richard W. 2019

2019
Loc

Alloperla lodgei

Frison 1935: 340

1935
Loc

Alloperla nanina:

Needham & Claassen 1925: 126

1925
Loc

Alloperla nanina

Banks 1911: 336

1911