Lampris australensis

Underkoffler, Karen E., Luers, Meagan A., Hyde, John R. & Craig, Matthew T., 2018, A taxonomic review of Lampris guttatus (Brünnich 1788) (Lampridiformes; Lampridae) with descriptions of three new species, Zootaxa 4413 (3), pp. 551-565: 556-557

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4413.3.9

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:4793D1AE-6DA6-4BC3-B432-E943B57283AA

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03B487C8-FFAD-FF93-EED9-41E8E734FA88

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Lampris australensis
status

n. sp.

Lampris australensis  , n. sp.

urn:lsid:zoobank.org:act:B4DA73E2-8559-4490-BB0F-9 EFCAbout EFC 46246401 Fig. 4C View Figure

Lampris guttatus (Brünnich 1788) 

Lampris guttatus Lineage  4. Hyde et al. 2014.

Common name. Southern Spotted Opah Holotype. CSIROAbout CSIRO H4880-01, unknown sex, 673 mm SL, 16.0 kg (preserved specimen weight), east of Tasman Island , Tasmania, 43° 12’ S, 148° 18’ E, 27 October 1998, longline.GoogleMaps 

Paratypes. CSIROAbout CSIRO H1993-1, unknown sex, 538 mm SL, 6.97 kg (preserved specimen weight), Tasmania, Australia, 24 July 1989, longline; AM I.24492-001, unknown sex, 870 mm SL, off Ulladulla, New South Wales, Australia, 15 March 1984.

Diagnosis. A species of Lampris  distinguished from other members of the genus by the following combination of characters: dorsal-fin rays I,52; anal-fin rays 40; pectoral-fin rays 23; pelvic-fin rays 13; greatest body depth 1.3 times in standard length; head length 2.7 times in standard length; eye diameter 5.2 times in head length; origin of pelvic fins below or posterior to middle of elongated portion of dorsal fin; dorsal profile of head distinctly arched (convex); body steel-blue with numerous, mostly circular, white to silver spots that often extend to distal tip of dorsal fin; caudal fin with wide, yellow margin; dorsal and anal fins with narrow yellow margin.

Description. Dorsal-fin rays I,52 (I,50–52); anal-fin rays 40 (40–42); pectoral-fin rays 23 (22–23); pelvic-fin rays 13 (13–15). Body laterally compressed and rounded, its greatest depth slightly anterior to pelvic fins and contained 1.37 (1.37–1.45) times in standard length; head length 2.78 (2.7–2.8) times in standard length; eye diameter 5.2 (5.0–5.2) in head length; pupil large; jaws protractible and lacking teeth; upper jaw shorter than lower jaw; lower jaw protrudes slightly forward of upper jaw, the tip narrowing to a blunt point; throat and palate without teeth. Lateral line angled above gill opening, arching above pectoral fins, and extending along mid-height of body through center of caudal peduncle. Scales small, thin, and easily removed over entire body. Dorsal fin long, the length of its base 1.8 (1.6–1.8) times in standard length; Dorsal fin high, its height contained 2.7 (2.5–2.7) in standard length.

Coloration. In dead specimens (unpreserved), body steel-blue with numerous, mostly circular, white to lightgrey spots that often extend to distal tip of dorsal fin; caudal fin with wide, yellow margin; dorsal and anal fins with narrow yellow margin. Fins red to scarlet red. In preserved specimens, body dark grey with spots and median fins appearing yellowish tan.

Distribution. Lampris australensis  is known only from the southern hemisphere where it is confirmed from specimens, photos, and DNAAbout DNA samples off Australia, Chile, South Africa, and Tasmania.

Etymology. The specific epithet is taken from the Latin australis meaning “southern” in reference to the known range of the species in the southern hemisphere.

Remarks. Dr. Stephen Lamberth of the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries of South Africa graciously provided morphological measurements of four uncatalogued specimens. Two of these specimens were genetically identified as L. guttatus Lineage  4 of Hyde et al. (2014) and the morphological measurements of all four specimens match well with the type material. Unfortunately these specimens are no longer available for deposition in a museum collection.

EFC

Escola de Florestas

CSIRO

Australian National Fish Collection

DNA

Department of Natural Resources, Environment, The Arts and Sport