Amphilius jacksonii

Thomson, Alfred W., Page, Lawrence M. & Hilber, Samantha A., 2015, Revision of the Amphilius jacksonii complex (Siluriformes: Amphiliidae), with the descriptions of five new species, Zootaxa 3986 (1), pp. 61-87: 62

publication ID

http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.3986.1.3

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:E06C9CDE-1896-44C4-87D8-780E6BAED2FF

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03A71476-2562-FF88-2A9D-E9EAFAA7FF2E

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Amphilius jacksonii
status

 

Amphilius jacksonii  complex

The Amphilius jacksonii  complex differs from all other species of the genus ( A. atesuensis  , A. brevis  , A. caudosignatus  , A. dimonikensis  , A. grammatophorus  , A. kakrimensis  , A. korupi  , A. lamani  , A. longirostris  , A. maesii  , A. mamonekenensis  , A. nigricaudatus  , A. opisthophthalmus  , A. platychir  , A. pulcher  , A. rheophilus  ) except A. lentiginosus  by its mottled body coloration that includes dark saddles that are joined to one another laterally (vs. body mottled, dark saddles not joined laterally). It differs from A. lentiginosus  by having the head and body without spots (vs. head and body heavily spotted) and by having fewer total gill rakers on the first gill arch (6–11, rarely 5 or 12 vs. 14–16). The A. jacksonii  complex further differs from A. longirostris  and A. opisthophthalmus  by having 6 + 7 principal caudal-fin rays (vs. 7 + 8) and a well developed crenelated epidermal fold (vs. rudimentary fold), and further differs from A. brevis  , A. dimonikensis  , A. korupi  , and A. maesii  by having distinct crenelations on the epidermal fold (vs. crenelations absent or very weak). It further differs from A. grammatophorus  , A. kakrimensis  , A. platychir  , and A. rheophilus  by having the lobes formed by epidermal fold crenelations rounded, Fig. 1View FIGURE 1 A (vs. lobes formed by epidermal fold crenelations elongated and pointed, Fig. 1View FIGURE 1 B) and from A. brevis  , A. caudosignatus  , A. dimonikensis  , A. korupi  , A. lamani  , A. maesii  , A. mamonekenensis  , A. nigricaudatus  , and A. pulcher  by having fewer branchiostegal rays (usually 6–8, rarely 5 or 9 vs. 9–10 in A. pulcher  , more than 9 in the other species).